Best travel kit recommendations

mikyok

Platinum Member
There seems to be a new plague of venues in England that are booking bands which have noise limiters that are more sensitive than a facebook debate.

I can and do have to play comically quite at times. I have my little Meazzi bop kit but whilst it sounds nice. 60s hardware is not the best for gigging and I'm having to do more DIY than I like to.

I've got my eye on the Odery café kit but these seem to go like hot cakes. There's only Wembley Drum Centre that sells them in the UK and they've sold out of them until December time.

Anyone got any recommendations?
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
A Gretsch Catalina bop set, which I usually hate, is actually good for that. They're light, cheap, and quiet-- quiet because they're little, and bc they just have a weak sound.
 

Matty1977

Senior Member
Obviously there are the usual Ludwig Breakbeats, Sonor Safari or Pearl Midtown options that have been written about time and time again on lots of forums.

The Odery kit looks amazing value. I am not surprised they sell out so quickly with such a low retail price.

Have you considered Sakae Pac-D in either 5 or 4 piece formats?

https://www.absolutemusic.co.uk/sakae-pac-d-5-piece-shell-pack-orange.html

The 4pc got some a great review in Rhythm magazine. With the current situation / rumours at Sakae, these might not be available for too long and I have always liked the look of them.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Obviously there are the usual Ludwig Breakbeats, Sonor Safari or Pearl Midtown options that have been written about time and time again on lots of forums.

The Odery kit looks amazing value. I am not surprised they sell out so quickly with such a low retail price.

Have you considered Sakae Pac-D in either 5 or 4 piece formats?

https://www.absolutemusic.co.uk/sakae-pac-d-5-piece-shell-pack-orange.html

The 4pc got some a great review in Rhythm magazine. With the current situation / rumours at Sakae, these might not be available for too long and I have always liked the look of them.
The Sakae looks stunning, very tempted for the money. More amazed something useful has been reviewed in Rhythm TBF :)

The guy who played my wedding had a Pearl midtown and it sounds good for its size. Had a chat with him about it. Only problem is I really don't like Pearl drums, all my bandmates know as well so I'd be called every hypocrite under the sun if I got one. Just my opinion before anyone gets their knickers in a twist!
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
There seems to be a new plague of venues in England that are booking bands which have noise limiters that are more sensitive than a facebook debate.....

....Anyone got any recommendations?

I hate to say it, but you might want to consider an e-kit, or a set of multi-pads rigged into a kit.

Pretty much complete control over volume, but you do have to have an amp along with it.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
I can't tell anything about the Sakae. Ad says they're perfectly round. Any ad that talks about their drums being "round" I would stay away from. How about bearing edges? Sizes? Close ups of lugs?

The Sakae looks stunning, very tempted for the money. More amazed something useful has been reviewed in Rhythm TBF :)

The guy who played my wedding had a Pearl midtown and it sounds good for its size. Had a chat with him about it. Only problem is I really don't like Pearl drums, all my bandmates know as well so I'd be called every hypocrite under the sun if I got one. Just my opinion before anyone gets their knickers in a twist!
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Now the Odery, their Cafe set looks very interesting, and I see it's like $399 US on Reverb. I'd look into Odery and forget Sakae.
 

Frank

Gold Member
Quiet doesn't come from the kit, it comes from the player.

A smaller kit is not going to solve volume problem. You need to build the light touch technique for these situations. It won't happen overnight, and you won't enjoy it overnight, but it can be done, and it can be lots of fun once you get comfortable.

The only solution cited above that can help you immediately is an electronic kit.
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
There seems to be a new plague of venues in England that are booking bands which have noise limiters that are more sensitive than a facebook debate.

I can and do have to play comically quite at times. I have my little Meazzi bop kit but whilst it sounds nice. 60s hardware is not the best for gigging and I'm having to do more DIY than I like to.

I've got my eye on the Odery café kit but these seem to go like hot cakes. There's only Wembley Drum Centre that sells them in the UK and they've sold out of them until December time.

Anyone got any recommendations?
Question: are you wanting a small kit so you can fit into the venue or so you can be quiet? I'm sure the usual answer would be "both", but if size is not the issue, I'd rather play softer with the drums I have. I play a mundane 4 or 5-piece in the usual 12/13/16/22 or 13/16/22 configurations and I've never had a problem playing under the crowd, plus, they actually sound like full drums. Most times I am more felt than heard, and only bigger drums enable that. Little tiny drums just sound like they're being punched all the time, and their sound disappears when you try to play underneath because there's not enough mass.

This is why I no longer play tiny kits.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Question: are you wanting a small kit so you can fit into the venue or so you can be quiet? I'm sure the usual answer would be "both", but if size is not the issue, I'd rather play softer with the drums I have. I play a mundane 4 or 5-piece in the usual 12/13/16/22 or 13/16/22 configurations and I've never had a problem playing under the crowd, plus, they actually sound like full drums. Most times I am more felt than heard, and only bigger drums enable that. Little tiny drums just sound like they're being punched all the time, and their sound disappears when you try to play underneath because there's not enough mass.

This is why I no longer play tiny kits.
Definitely a bit/lot of both dependent on where I'm playing. There's a lot of places that are doing weddings/functions now and are purely after the cash and will book bands without thinking of how loud a band is and the room a band needs. It's a bad deal for the client and the band playing.

I'm after a bit more control when factors like the room acoustics are working against me. I play a 22/12/16/18 and playing under a crowd isn't a problem, I can tickle with the best of em. This is more trying not to trip the mains in a gig which is what noise limiters do. You also spend the whole gig looking at the limiter trying not to trip the power.

I find it a bit embarrassing when everyone is turned right down and you have to play something up beat that needs to quote Spinal Tap "that extra push over the cliff". It kills the feel/dynamics and trying to explain to people why you can turn up or play louder is akin to pissing in the wind.

The place I'm playing tomorrow has an 80db limiter, The noise limiter is usually placed in the stupidest place possible like right next to the band instead of outside the venue where the noise would be a problem for neighbours. They are also very sensitive to certain frequencies, bass being the main one although I played a place where my 12" tom was nearly tripping the mains every time I touched it and I mean touch.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Quiet doesn't come from the kit, it comes from the player.

A smaller kit is not going to solve volume problem. You need to build the light touch technique for these situations. It won't happen overnight, and you won't enjoy it overnight, but it can be done, and it can be lots of fun once you get comfortable.

The only solution cited above that can help you immediately is an electronic kit.
Totally agree, good job I can do light touch well. Technique is not the problem.

Spending an entire gig staring at a box trying not to trip the mains is not my idea of entertaining someone or fun. Especially when you could pop your PA or the valves in the guitarists amps.

Can't justify an electric kit, I can play as quiet as they can go without using headphones.

I get the feeling you guys from across the drink don't have these limiters.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Now the Odery, their Cafe set looks very interesting, and I see it's like $399 US on Reverb. I'd look into Odery and forget Sakae.
It's £350 here which is a great deal and a big problem solver but they're sold out in the UK. That tells me lots of other people are having the same issues here :)

Postage from the US can sting a bit then there's customs once it gets here.

The Sakae specs is:

16x16 BD
10x7 tom
13x11 floor

5 piece comes with a 8" tom also.

I'm not arsed about the snare I prefer my own.

Wood is Asian mahogany (whatever that is) with cherry outerply.
Can't find any bearing edge info.
 

Matty1977

Senior Member
I get the feeling you guys from across the drink don't have these limiters.
Wide open spaces and fewer NIMBYs in the U. S of A.

I hate the things. No experience of playing with them as a drummer but plenty when I was a gigging guitarist with a functions band years ago. I actually blew a very nice Rivera guitar amp as a direct result of a limiter kicking in and had to play the rest of the gig through the PA. Not fun and not cheap. Spent the rest of the gig unable to hear myself and seriously hacked off about blowing my amp.

The singer used to keep a couple of very long extension leads with the PA kit at all times. Occasionally he would ask one of us to distract the venue owner / officious committee member (I'm sure you know the type you get at clubs..... Brian Potters), while he ran off to find sockets that weren't connected to the limiter. Unprofessional? possibly but we never lost a regular gig as a result of being cheeky with the power source.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Wide open spaces and fewer NIMBYs in the U. S of A.

I hate the things. No experience of playing with them as a drummer but plenty when I was a gigging guitarist with a functions band years ago. I actually blew a very nice Rivera guitar amp as a direct result of a limiter kicking in and had to play the rest of the gig through the PA. Not fun and not cheap. Spent the rest of the gig unable to hear myself and seriously hacked off about blowing my amp.

The singer used to keep a couple of very long extension leads with the PA kit at all times. Occasionally he would ask one of us to distract the venue owner / officious committee member (I'm sure you know the type you get at clubs..... Brian Potters), while he ran off to find sockets that weren't connected to the limiter. Unprofessional? possibly but we never lost a regular gig as a result of being cheeky with the power source.
You've hit the nail on the head sir.

We had some odious little cretin threaten to power switch the band at a venue in Lichfield earlier in the year. Fortunately they're building HS2 through the venue :) Crazy thing is the venue is miles from anywhere and the farmer who owns it lives behind the stage. Again someone who wants the money from weddings but doesn't want the noise.

Now time to get some long extension leads :). Not unprofessional, that's a genius idea!

I wonder how many of these venues are insured against damage caused to equipment as a result of an oversensitive noise limiter.

My folks used to get the Brian Potters back in the 70s. They did a gig where the noise limiter cut the bingo caller off :)
 

Frank

Gold Member
I know this is a downer statement, but - if I owned a venue and decided to make a volume level decision, and enforce it with a limiter, I would be less than pleased if a band tried to defeat that. They'd never return to my venue.

Finding a way to defeat that is the wrong answer.
 

Matty1977

Senior Member
I know this is a downer statement.
Possibly but it's valid too. Just to clarify, my initial anecdote and last post were certainly intended more as tongue in cheek banter with the OP rather than a concrete solution to his particular issue.
 
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