Best Speaker(s) for Electronic Drum Kit

lefty2

Platinum Member
30 - 50 Watts is plenty for private practice at home.

Once you add a live band with guitar amps, then you need a lot more. As I said earlier, my PM-10 is loud enough for me to hear myself at gigs. But not enough to fill a venue and reach an audience.
Good that's what I was hoping. When I'm with my band I have a sound system that I run through all I need is a monitor and sometimes not even that I'll use in ears.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Are you input jack limited? 1/4", XLR, Neutric 4 or 8 pin, 2 wire? Just curious as not all monitors support all input types.
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
Are you input jack limited? 1/4", XLR, Neutric 4 or 8 pin, 2 wire? Just curious as not all monitors support all input types.
I never thought about anything like that. Pretty sure that my line out on the module is quarter inch. I would imagine I could buy a cable that would fit the monitor speaker and if necessary one of those adapters Transformers or whatever they are kind of like XLR to quarter inch.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I never thought about anything like that. Pretty sure that my line out on the module is quarter inch. I would imagine I could buy a cable that would fit the monitor speaker and if necessary one of those adapters Transformers or whatever they are kind of like XLR to quarter inch.
Oh yeah then that's easy. Adapter are pretty common for 1/4". Other combinations may be a bit trickier. Just something else to think about.
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
I plug into my stereo receiver and push out with my 3 way tower speakers. Works well for both highs and lows.
Yeah that's what I do at home and it sounds absolutely great. I've got some small main PA speakers 15 inch woofers and some kind of horns or tweeters I don't know they're peavey's that I'm using with the stereo. But I want something portable that I can take to my church or small coffee house or something like that.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I cannot stress enough if you haven't tried studio monitors to go this route. I have 2 KRK rokit 8's with a 10 inch sub and man it sounds amazing with some VST's slapped on there.

The Key is the sub due to the amount of low end in EKITs. but you also need crisp highs and mids.

Pa speakers with a 15 have very harsh highs, and sloppy lows
.
Some headphones sound fantastic, if they can handle the low end. Multiple drivers is the key. My IEMS are great with ekits.



I am going to assume people who have not recommended studio monitors don't have any, but it was a game changer for me and stopped me from selling the ekit.

I have not tried my TV speakers/ surround sound but I don't see it being on par with the monitors anyways
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I cannot stress enough if you haven't tried studio monitors to go this route. I have 2 KRK rokit 8's with a 10 inch sub and man it sounds amazing with some VST's slapped on there.

The Key is the sub due to the amount of low end in EKITs. but you also need crisp highs and mids.

Pa speakers with a 15 have very harsh highs, and sloppy lows
.
Some headphones sound fantastic, if they can handle the low end. Multiple drivers is the key. My IEMS are great with ekits.



I am going to assume people who have not recommended studio monitors don't have any, but it was a game changer for me and stopped me from selling the ekit.

I have not tried my TV speakers/ surround sound but I don't see it being on par with the monitors anyways
I have to disagree, to an extent. Not to be a jerk, but I build these things for a living.

You are correct to a degree about the highs in a PA speaker. The typical range for a driver driven PA is 1k to 20k. The upper extent of a driver driven horn is so high that it is almost out of the range of a human ear. Volume plays a big factor in keeping the drivers at bay. The higher the volume, the more obnoxious they sound. Tweeter driven highs are just as bad but require more tweeters to equal the power of a driver driven horn.

Lows are not solely dependant on the diameter of the woofer in the cabinet. The woofer itself plays a huge factor, magnet size, cone, depth of woofer, the voice coil, as well as the cabinet itself. For example, a Yamaha CW115V puts out more lows than a C215V. The previous has one woofer and the latter has two, but the single woofer in the CW115V is meant for lows, the two in the C215V are not. Both contain 15s. If you put the two woofers side by side you can see the difference. And the cabinet for the CW115V is square, the C215V is a 60 degree cabinet. The square cabinet pushes more air. If we test either cabinet with the sound file meant for the other, both sound like crap. The CW115V sounds weak while the C215V almost sounds like nothing. It is eerily quiet.

Your two 8s and 10" sub sound great because the woofers within are doing the job they are meant to do. If you use a 10 that wasn't meant to be a sub your lows would be thin and unsatisfying. On the flip side, if your 8s were meant to push lows your highs would suffer.

This can be tested by playing music through either setup. Guitars and vocals are all but lost when running through only a sub, while drums and bass suffer the same fate being pushed through something only meant for highs. If you have a PA speaker, unhook either the woofer or driver and run the test.

I totally agree about studio monitors, they are designed to handle both high and lows, thus the reason they deliver excellent range of frequency and sound in a single compact package.

Before anyone brings up the Bose soundwave, open one up and look at it. It uses air channels to accentuate frequency. The speaker without the air passages sounds okay at best.

I guess what I'm saying is don't blame the speaker cabinet. Blame the user who wants it to do something it isn't meant to do.

I think your surround sound would probably work well, as it was designed to accommodate a wide range of frequencies and sound thicknesses. If you watch a movie and the lows make the floor shake, it should be just fine.

EDIT: C215V is a 75 degree cabinet, not 60. I just confirmed this with the manual. Sorry.
 
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fl.tom

Senior Member
I was wondering about using a powered monitor as a speaker for myE kit. Guess they won't work very good then. Right now I just use my stereo system at home. I'm using Peavey main cabinets with a 15 and some type of horn. They are SP 5 ti speakers. They sound good but are not very portable. So I was wondering about a small monitor which it was powered I could use it as my personal monitor when I take this kit out to low volume gigs. Other than that I don't really use the kit
FWIW, I used to run a JBL EON10 G2 powered speaker with a Roland TD20 for low volume gigs and at home. Sure, it didn't have the range of studio monitors or low-end w/o a subwoofer, but it was relatively warm, punchy and accurate, and very easy to transport. And if it wasn't loud enough for a particular venue, I'd run it through a DI to FOH and still use it as a monitor.

If the EONs would have been available in a 12" I would have went with it instead, but the 15" was overkill for me. From everything you've stated, believe you'd be fine with something similar.
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
I appreciate the replies. I decided to go to GC and listen to a Simmons 50 watt drum amp on an E-kit, after reading some reviews in favor of them. I liked what I heard and ordered a used one for $129 + shipping. It's relatively small, and sounded pretty good to me, and should have enough volume for what I want. Thanks guys.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I have to disagree, to an extent. Not to be a jerk, but I build these things for a living.

You are correct to a degree about the highs in a PA speaker. The typical range for a driver driven PA is 1k to 20k. The upper extent of a driver driven horn is so high that it is almost out of the range of a human ear. Volume plays a big factor in keeping the drivers at bay. The higher the volume, the more obnoxious they sound. Tweeter driven highs are just as bad but require more tweeters to equal the power of a driver driven horn.

Lows are not solely dependant on the diameter of the woofer in the cabinet. The woofer itself plays a huge factor, magnet size, cone, depth of woofer, the voice coil, as well as the cabinet itself. For example, a Yamaha CW115V puts out more lows than a C215V. The previous has one woofer and the latter has two, but the single woofer in the CW115V is meant for lows, the two in the C215V are not. Both contain 15s. If you put the two woofers side by side you can see the difference. And the cabinet for the CW115V is square, the C215V is a 60 degree cabinet. The square cabinet pushes more air. If we test either cabinet with the sound file meant for the other, both sound like crap. The CW115V sounds weak while the C215V almost sounds like nothing. It is eerily quiet.

Your two 8s and 10" sub sound great because the woofers within are doing the job they are meant to do. If you use a 10 that wasn't meant to be a sub your lows would be thin and unsatisfying. On the flip side, if your 8s were meant to push lows your highs would suffer.

This can be tested by playing music through either setup. Guitars and vocals are all but lost when running through only a sub, while drums and bass suffer the same fate being pushed through something only meant for highs. If you have a PA speaker, unhook either the woofer or driver and run the test.

I totally agree about studio monitors, they are designed to handle both high and lows, thus the reason they deliver excellent range of frequency and sound in a single compact package.

Before anyone brings up the Bose soundwave, open one up and look at it. It uses air channels to accentuate frequency. The speaker without the air passages sounds okay at best.

I guess what I'm saying is don't blame the speaker cabinet. Blame the user who wants it to do something it isn't meant to do.

I think your surround sound would probably work well, as it was designed to accommodate a wide range of frequencies and sound thicknesses. If you watch a movie and the lows make the floor shake, it should be just fine.

EDIT: C215V is a 75 degree cabinet, not 60. I just confirmed this with the manual. Sorry.


I guess I only tried on a few PA systems... I think on a High end PA it would make a difference. Or a PA system with a sub would help.. I just found it harsh and flat sounding.. EQ would really help with this.. I just noticed even on my Rokit 5's, and no sub.. the sound was punchy and full also.

Your right about the surround.. it can make the windows rattle.

When working with price though, those rokit 8's, even without a sub were only a few hundred... to get that same sound out of a PA will be more money. but it depends on if you want to play with a band or jam solo.. Those monitors won't compete with guitar amps like a PA does.

I tried the roland EDRUM speakers or whatever and prefered the monitors over that too.

You are correct about the application of PA systems as well. for jam we use it for vocals, and drums.. getting the right speakers, and amp is critical if you want it to work..
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I guess I only tried on a few PA systems... I think on a High end PA it would make a difference. Or a PA system with a sub would help.. I just found it harsh and flat sounding.. EQ would really help with this.. I just noticed even on my Rokit 5's, and no sub.. the sound was punchy and full also.

Your right about the surround.. it can make the windows rattle.

When working with price though, those rokit 8's, even without a sub were only a few hundred... to get that same sound out of a PA will be more money. but it depends on if you want to play with a band or jam solo.. Those monitors won't compete with guitar amps like a PA does.

I tried the roland EDRUM speakers or whatever and prefered the monitors over that too.

You are correct about the application of PA systems as well. for jam we use it for vocals, and drums.. getting the right speakers, and amp is critical if you want it to work..

Oh yeah, definitely. Plugging in directly to a passive PA speaker, it just replicates the info sent to it. An EQ is a must, or at least an amp where you can adjust the levels.

Powered PA systems are a bit more user-friendly in this aspect. You can adjust the levels right on the cabinet. You pay for what you get though. An EV ETX-10P has a class D amp and pushes 1100 watts (I think, it might be 1200) but you will be shelling out at least a grand for a new one. The lows are fat, the highs are clean, but again you get what you pay for.

My favorite cabinets we make are EV QRX series. They are incredibly stable, sound really rich, can be run bi-amp or full range (you can daisy chain them), and the 218S sub is amazing. It shakes the line, the concrete floor, the work stations, it is a monster!
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
Well my Simmons da50 used drum amp showed up today. Only got to fool with it for a little bit because it's late. It's everything I hoped it would be. Granted it will not fill an auditorium full of Great Sound but it will work great for a personal monitor, go in small rooms it may even be enough to fill the room.
 

eclypse

Junior Member
Just picked up a Roland's PM-200 tonight.. made for v-drums.. 180watts.

There smaller PM-100 model is 80watts. Prob best for when your neighbors are away from home either way. Hehe.. grab some good headphones.
 
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