Best piece(s) of advice you've gotten from this forum?

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
The best advice Ive received was the “quote “ button on old format, then the “ignore” button on this new one LOl just kidding about later- I never ignore any comments. After all from the “How Bad of a drummer are you” thread -the forum is covered in bad drummers/ how bad you ask? Read the thread . Anyways the best advice I’ve gotten here was same in grad school “ Keep it simple stupid” which science snd music can get complicated on its own without any help from me. Simple, elegant focused like a laser to task still can turn into complicated for either. Some of the most musical tasteful drumming was’t thst complicated per se as just original, creative, fitting to music so grabs your interest.
 

NackAttack

Well-known member
This forum has provided me with lots of insight. There are so many friendly and knowledgeable members here, so I rarely post. I’m on here daily and I mostly read. I lay back and soak up those rays of drumshine.
 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
Since joining a couple of years ago as a beginner drummer I have found and solicited lots and lots of good advice.
Some of the easiest to remember advice has also proven to be extremely helpful.

Spend time practicing very slowly.

Work on paradidles.

Volume control is mostly a technique issue.

Have fun.

Thanks for the advice, it is helping!
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
It's been a culmination of things for me and not anything in particular. I used to think I was a way better drummer before logging onto DW. That image was quickly shattered. I used to be in the bigger/more camp (5 toms, two snares, 4 crashes, two chinas, splashes, effects, etc, etc,) but learned how to do way more, with way less. This was a tough and lengthy transition, not because I was shamed into doing it, but more of a challenge of things to explore. Far more comfortable and effective now.

Reading about how you need mics to hear yourself and play back for evaluations, not only helped me clean up my playing, but I also realized the mics weren't differentiating between all those cymbals as much as I thought. Bigger gaps sounded better and and toms could be manipulated to sound differently, based on technique. Never knew any of this playing with straight earplugs as I had and isolating myself from the volume. I had learned to play somewhat dynamically, based on a previous original band I was in, so the concept wasn't totally new. I just didn't realize just how much until I could balance things out through mics and mixer. I've also discovered how incredibly tough it is to make a decent video. That alone makes the EAD10 and Yamaha's Rec n Share app worth every penny....even though I returned mine!

The concept of overplaying was foreign to me. For the most part, I wasn't guilty of this, but was adding some "fillers" to compensate for areas where I could use additional focus and work.

Probably the biggest change has been from the influence DW has had in my taking lessons. There were just some gross inequities that required attention...still are.
 

BALDY

New member
I've gotten so much good advice from this forum, I thought it would be cool to share. Here are the two that stick with me:

1. I know I've said this so many times you're probably sick of it, but treating my drumming as if I'm an independent contractor as opposed to a band member has changed my life for the better.

2. Here's a good one when it comes to buying and selling: If you are having a hard time to get someone to take your money, it's time to walk away from the deal.

How about you? What's the best advice you've gotten from DW?
Hi guys, I’ve just got a Johnny brook 2 weeks ago as I’m desperate to keep playing music. I’ve only had use of my left arm due to a bike smash 25 year ago. Should I do away with hi hat cos I can’t hit that the same time as the snare or owt else. If someone can help me I’ll be able say if this site as helped me, please help a frustrated beginner.
 
Although my drum teacher didn't teach me the crazy chops or the insane independence and grooves I am fascinated by and always try to work on, what I thank him for is teaching me to pay attention to HOW I play instead of WHAT I play. Any great drummer does that.

Playing the same rhythm with the same dynamics, tempo, ghost note consistency and feel for 3 minutes straight is harder than I had ever imagined. I would always try to add some quick ghost notes to even the simplest of grooves but if i were to repeat the bar I just played my ghost notes would not be the same the second time. That is what I have been working on for the last year. Thankfully, I got out of the blazing fast playing quite quick and at 20 years of age am currently looking forward to playing professionally for years to come.

Also, ALWAYS RECORD YOUR PRACTISE. At the time of playing I always feel like I am a god but going back to watch what I played I would always pick up on unnecessary motions I had gotten used to playing (maybe a wrist turn from hi-hat to the floor tom or inconsistent double stroke ghost notes for RLL fills).

PS. Yes Gavin is my favourite drummer (hence the references, if you got them).
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Hi guys, I’ve just got a Johnny brook 2 weeks ago as I’m desperate to keep playing music. I’ve only had use of my left arm due to a bike smash 25 year ago. Should I do away with hi hat cos I can’t hit that the same time as the snare or owt else. If someone can help me I’ll be able say if this site as helped me, please help a frustrated beginner.
There's so much you can still do with hats, there's no need to eliminate them. In linear drumming, no limb hits anything at the same time as another. This may not apply to feet necessarily, but certainly a technique emphasized in books and lessons. No reason why your left hand can't become fast enough to apply linear drum techniques, and just kill it on drums. You can also learn to alternate between hand and foot to do faster hat patterns, or simply cover the hat parts with your foot, to free up your hand for other things. You can also replicate the open hat sound without ever taking a stick to it, leaving your hand free for other things.

I've had several shoulder injuries, which took away the use of one arm or the other. I just played with the remaining one. Wasn't easy, but things certainly improved over time. No reason to be discouraged.
 

BALDY

New member
There's so much you can still do with hats, there's no need to eliminate them. In linear drumming, no limb hits anything at the same time as another. This may not apply to feet necessarily, but certainly a technique emphasized in books and lessons. No reason why your left hand can't become fast enough to apply linear drum techniques, and just kill it on drums. You can also learn to alternate between hand and foot to do faster hat patterns, or simply cover the hat parts with your foot, to free up your hand for other things. You can also replicate the open hat sound without ever taking a stick to it, leaving your hand free for other things.

I've had several shoulder injuries, which took away the use of one arm or the other. I just played with the remaining one. Wasn't easy, but things certainly improved over time. No reason to be discouraged.
Many thanks, I played guitar before my crash but the drums are by far so much harder.
 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
Baldy, you have the advantage of playing another instrument, plus knowledge of song form and time. Of course your technical challenges are different, but that knowledge is way more important to making a band work than tearing up a fill.
Why the heck not? You can do it. And your dedication will be visually apparent and hopefully add to your cred. There are all sorts of electronic tools to experiment with too these days.
I am inspired by, and rooting for you
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
It was more of a perspective than advice, but when Bermuda mentioned he liked the tones of his toms to be similar to piano tones in that the high notes go 'plink' (quicker in decay) the low notes 'bohm" (slower in decay, more resonance)....something to this effect, it really resonated with me and made me think about what I want from my toms. I think what it made me realize is that my favorite tones are really more in that vain that in the equal resonance for each drum approach.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Best advice was from WhoisTony.

Every drum teacher I've ever had (including everyone at PIT) teaches 16th note triplets in 2 groups of 3.
Many pro drummers play 16h note triplets in groups of 2s and 4.
Trying to play 2 and 4s while counting 3 never made sense to my brain, and hence, I sucked at it.

Tony taught me some alternative methods to count and feel the 2s and 4.

Awesome life-changing advice.

Though the best thing to happen to me from this forum is meeting and becoming friends with numerous people in real life. Particularly Nick (Livingdeaddrummer) who is now a dear friend that I hang out with regularly (well, pre all this COVID stuff anyway).
 

BALDY

New member
Baldy, you have the advantage of playing another instrument, plus knowledge of song form and time. Of course your technical challenges are different, but that knowledge is way more important to making a band work than tearing up a fill.
Why the heck not? You can do it. And your dedication will be visually apparent and hopefully add to your cred. There are all sorts of electronic tools to experiment with too these days.
I am inspired by, and rooting for you
Much appreciated my friend
 

GOOSE72

Well-known member
To open my mouth and close my eyes. 1st rule there are no rules. And give your Dog a treat every now and then. Thank you I appreciate you all.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
So, what do you do when you're in a band and you want the contractor role in said band?
Several years ago, there was a band in which I was "steering the ship" so to speak. Overall, music was more of a priority with me than the other guys, and if there was ever a band I was a part of that I felt never reached its full potential, it was this one. While there was an incredible amount of talent, there was a real lack of "hustle." After about 2.5 years of trying to navigate everyone's schedules in addition to being in charge of the PA system, hauling and playing drums, being in charge of booking and practice schedules and finances and recording (I recorded and mixed our projects), I finally stepped back and said, "Ok guys, here's the deal. I will play as much or as little as y'all want to. Y'all book'em, and I'll play'em. Just let me know."

I guess the lesson here is if you choose to go from captain of the ship to just a passenger/hired hand, don't be surprised if the band you are in becomes very inactive. The band I wrote about above only played one more show and disbanded.
 
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