Best pedal for a large bass drum?

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
What? They want to hit center-they don't need to. A too long a beater (or too short) will affect your speed and dexterity (I didn't see that comment). So trying to hit center may throw off their usual beater dexterity. Least that's my experience experimenting with beater length. I don't change my beater moving the pedal from my 16 in kick and my 24 in kick. My pedal is set for my pleasure not the bass drum pleasure. Just my two cents.
 
Forget the Tama HP50 Classic by the way. After spending some time with it, I realized that the highest setting is still lower than an Iron Cobra. So the adjustable height party trick is more about being able to use a 16" or 18" without a riser.
Yes, I looked at this pedal... they don't mention it anywhere, but the beater height at maximun is a "normal" height... it can be adjusted lower though to accommodate 18"-20" bass drums.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
What? They want to hit center-they don't need to. A too long a beater (or too short) will affect your speed and dexterity (I didn't see that comment). So trying to hit center may throw off their usual beater dexterity. Least that's my experience experimenting with beater length. I don't change my beater moving the pedal from my 16 in kick and my 24 in kick. My pedal is set for my pleasure not the bass drum pleasure. Just my two cents.
And THAT'S WHY you tension the heads to suit the playing of the drum. Each rod is not ever going to be equal if you want the sound to be great to your ears, or mic, when you PLAY the drum/bass drum.
The beater of a pedal hits in the same spot, but each stroke is never the same. Each stroke of a snare or tom is never in the same spot, so those need to be tensioned to each individuals playing--preferably while it's ON it's mount or basket with a tom on a snare stand.
You don't PLAY the drum while holding it and hitting it to hear the "note", and it's not going to sound like that when you play on it anyway.

Get any drum in the general area you want to hear, and then tweak it while it's in a playing position, at the same lightness or heaviness that you actually hit that drum while in a playing situation.
Sometimes you need to stand over the bass drum and tweak a lug or two while you hit it. It's a little awkward, but worth it if you want a good sounding drum.

Just my 50 cents....
 

TxGroove

Junior Member
Tama Iron Cobra with a hard mallet, similar to the ones Ludwig makes with the hard felt or wooden mallet. Beat the snot out of it.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
My advice: DO NOT extend the beater to reach further toward the center. Bass pedals have a sweet spot. If you go too short or too long, physics will be working against you. Longer settings will start to feel sluggish and stiff. Doubles will become much more difficult too, just try it.

According to Colin Bailey's Bass Drum Control book, 4.75" is the optimal exposed length of the beater. So, anywhere around that is the sweet spot, give or take an inch, maybe?



IMO, the balance and feel of the beater is much more important that hitting the center of the bass drum.
 
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