Bernard Purdie Interview / Rick Beato

Nacci

Member
There were about three or four years in a row that Bernard Purdie was at the Connecticut Drum Show. He was endorsing Sakae at the time, he had written a book and had a table set up and was selling it. Several times he would just sit down on a kit and hold court.

He would just walk around like everyone else, looking at gear and talking with whoever wanted to talk, get a picture, get an autograph.
 

jda

Well-known Member
I can't spare over an hour to listen to Purdie's Proclamations. Did he still insist he "fixed" 21 Beatles tracks?
no but he admits his mouth has got him in trouble (big trouble) over the years; closest he got.
This interview seems like possibly one of his - is a toward the end- i.e. "last..

Beato asks why the swish is on the right (main ride position and Pretty drifts to a story with Avedis hitting a cymbal with one's hand..
Bern's getting Up There (old!!

There'll never be any denying about Purdie and rhythm section smoking those Steely Dan tracks
But this interview strikes me as being "near the end" the last.

Home at Last
 
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River19

Senior Member
I have it que'd up to watch. I like Beato a lot, like all strong personalities and people with "takes" they can be polarizing.

I always come away from BP interviews with the impression BP's biggest fan is the guy in the mirror. Not to take anything away from his playing, which is great, but I tend to gravitate to humble players who exude confidence but haven't been on a 50year PR campaign for how great they are.
 
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theseer2

Junior Member
Great interview, Beato did an excellent job, Purdie- anything he plays just sounds so special, just hitting the bass drum a few times is magical. As for his boasting- I'm sure he learned how to do that as a businessman making a living for himself in a dog eat dog industry. He can brag all he wants, he has the right and earned it.
 

Multijd

Active Member
Beato says in the beginning that it’s a long interview (1:16:00 ish) and it may be best to listen to it in segments. I just finished segment one!! About 20 min. I gotta agree with Joe, BP veers off wherever despite the question. There are gems though. Like J said, may be the last dance.
 
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jda

Well-known Member
totally right (He's getting old ) it happens
sometimes read he was born in 39 other times 42 and 41
if he was born in 39 (June) that's near 83
 

newoldie

Silver Member
I wouldn't think being 81 means this is the end. YMMV according to genetics and health, how you took care of yourself all those years, etc.
Look at legendary drummer Roy Haynes, who's 97 and played into his early 90's, at least from what's available that I've seen on YT.

You never know how long a drummer can continue touring or publicly playing-- being a BP style drummer is different than being a Buddy Rich style drummer, the latter would seem impossible to sustain into one's 70s, 80s and beyond. But I could see Purdie grooving along for some time still on the drumset.
Hey, Ringo's 81 and doesn't he still jump on the kit with his other drummer while on tour, sings, etc.?
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Bernard used to get pics done at a place in Miami that I worked at, and I thought he was quite a nice guy. I had no idea about this Beatles thing at the time and I don’t really care. I liked him and he was nice to me.
 

jda

Well-known Member
I wouldn't think being 81 means this is the end. YMMV according to genetics and health, how you took care of yourself all those years, etc.
Look at legendary drummer Roy Haynes, who's 97 and played into his early 90's, at least from what's available that I've seen on YT.

You never know how long a drummer can continue touring or publicly playing-- being a BP style drummer is different than being a Buddy Rich style drummer, the latter would seem impossible to sustain into one's 70s, 80s and beyond. But I could see Purdie grooving along for some time still on the drumset.
Hey, Ringo's 81 and doesn't he still jump on the kit with his other drummer while on tour, sings, etc.?
talking about how he was speaking interpreting the questions answering in philosophical way

Or Rick was asking 'too' direct of question to someone who seems to be reflecting (in reflecting-mode) of his life cay sa rah say rah

Asking how often a mic was placed underneath the snare might have been better asked to Bern 20 years ago +/-
You ask that question to Roy at 97 he may lunge at ya (lol He may jump out of the chair (lol
 

EssKayKay

Senior Member
Not to detract from the interview which I liked (Yeah, BP can be a little into himself but that’s fine with me too) – but I have a different question. Maybe this is quite common but I noticed he has his high tom on the right side of his 2-up configuration. Is this more widespread than I thought?
 

eddypierce

Senior Member
Beato played the studio version of "Memphis Soul Stew" for Purdie and asked him about recording it. Gene Chrisman actually played drums on this record. It's not surprising that Purdie didn't acknowledge this and just went along with it. Purdie DID of course play on the fabulous live recording of it with King Curtis.
 

jda

Well-known Member
Not to detract from the interview which I liked (Yeah, BP can be a little into himself but that’s fine with me too) – but I have a different question. Maybe this is quite common but I noticed he has his high tom on the right side of his 2-up configuration. Is this more widespread than I thought?

it's a layout -like the keys- of a piano (ascending)
I love it.
especially when it's a 12/10

10 as First tom (coming off snare) is "too high" (sometimes) (most of the time) and yet, placed to the right of the 12" places the 10 in an accessory or auxiliary position that- imho works beautifully (there.
Allows Ride cymbal (to be) pulled in closer; Still a 5 pc. "target" wise.. ; has many benefits.

think of it as a 4pc with (small) auxiliary tom

gretsch12101418 001.JPG

anti-in a gadda da vida
or soyl/ white room Cream but compact
and darn concise
it's for the thinking drummer ;) even when he doesn't have to think
 
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moodman

Well-known Member
I wouldn't think being 81 means this is the end. YMMV according to genetics and health, how you took care of yourself all those years, etc.
Look at legendary drummer Roy Haynes, who's 97 and played into his early 90's, at least from what's available that I've seen on YT.

You never know how long a drummer can continue touring or publicly playing-- being a BP style drummer is different than being a Buddy Rich style drummer, the latter would seem impossible to sustain into one's 70s, 80s and beyond. But I could see Purdie grooving along for some time still on the drumset.
Hey, Ringo's 81 and doesn't he still jump on the kit with his other drummer while on tour, sings, etc.?
I'm 75 and gigging, 61 years of muscle memory keeps me playing good and my pedal work is fine though I can barely walk.
The Moeller method exists because Civil War drummer boys were still killin' it on their parade drums as old men and Moeller took notice of their technique.
Some are 'old' at 50, others stay viable well into old age. My 70 year old wife carries and loads my drums and is in better shape physically most folks her age, good genes.
 
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