Beginner Drummer

I am a beginner at drumming and I will be happy to take suggestion regarding how to build a routine for drumming practice for a monthly basis or other.
I have played drums before and know some basic drum beats and fills.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Lots of folks like to work on exercises using a metronome. They then log their progress in a notebook to keep track of where they are at.

Only you can determine what to work on. You have to give yourself a direction then set goals in accordance to where you want to be.

Dont expect overnight success. Drums are both awesome and frustrating. Just when you think you have something figured out, it doesnt work anymore.
 
Welcome! Google "drummerworld practice routine" and you'll get tons of ideas. A teacher is your best option, especially in the beginning: you'll learn all the fundamentals and avoid some bad habits because a book can't criticize and correct. If you're tight on cash, then a pretty well structured course would be "A Fresh Approach to the Drum Set": http://www.mwpublications.com/shop/a-fresh-approach-to-the-drum-set/ Still, try to get a few (online) lessons at least.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
As MrInsane explains, you'll need to determine what you want to achieve as a drummer. And as Swissward recommends, an instructor willing to invest time in your development is your best option. Don't be misguided by a thousand divergent suggestions. Find an instructor, get on board with his or her program, and tune out all peripheral noise. Then get right down to the serious work of becoming a drummer.
 

tfgretsch

Junior Member
Stay positive, keep telling yourself when things seem like you are not getting anywhere,pour on the practice ! because you are getting there little by little and you will be proud of your self for it !! good luck brother drummer !
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
The practice pad is a good way to evolve, I have only one and I follow some music on it, it's practical to practice at night. Soon, I'll add the rudiments practice on the same pad.

I practice jazz so I developed my own thing, I have a general exercise guide called the jazz drumming system with comping, slowing, fills, brushes, music in 4:4 3:4 5:4 etc. I have another comping book, I have books from John Riley with more specialized things in it. One day it's snare comping, the other day is bass drum, snare and bass drum, hi-hats, the other day is fill, setup and hits, independance exercices, easy play along song, harder play along songs.

Listening to a lot of music.

I'll see if it works in 1 year but lately I was happy with my improvements. I do this as a hobby.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I find taking frequent breaks and changing what I’m working on every 5 minutes or so really helps. Also, when you are starting out, playing everything very slowly, with big motions, is really helpful. It keeps you from getting frustrated, and it helps avoid bad technique habits.
Absolutely on the frequent breaks. The mind absorbs material much better in increments. Segmenting practice sessions is a very useful strategy. Otherwise, it all starts to bleed into an indistinguishable mass. This is especially critical for beginners.
 
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MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I find taking frequent breaks and changing what I’m working on every 5 minutes or so really helps. Also, when you are starting out, playing everything very slowly, with big motions, is really helpful. It keeps you from getting frustrated, and it helps avoid bad technique habits.
Absolutely on the frequent breaks. The mind absorbs material much better in increments. Segmenting practice sessions is a very useful strategy. Otherwise, it all starts to bleed into an indistinguishing mass. This is especially critical for beginners.
On top of this, if you start to get frustrated with your practice, stop. Move on to something else for a while then revisit it when your head is clear. Trying to force practice is counter productive, and can lead to mental hurdles. Mental hurdles are harder to overcome than physical ones.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Take a month and find an online instructor you like. Drumeo, Drum Workout, Two hands, etc...

Once you find the one you like, follow their program.

Quite honestly, they all teach almost the exact same things. The difference is in the presentation, ordering, and prioritization of disciplines.

Once the pandemic is over and you are permitted, get a real-life instructor to set some goals, fix broken technique, and answer questions in real time. You only have to see them every month or two.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
If you want to jam with bands then play along with recordings, or the radio. Audition for bands now because the gig situation can't get much worse, what do you have to lose?
 

Auspicious

Well-known member
No job heh?

Musicians should come to work in nursing homes, in health care, all jobless drummers doing humanitarian work and a bit of low volume music for the old folks at the end of the day. 😅
 

Strange

Junior Member
I usually warm up with a slow technique/exercise that focus on something I want to get better at. It is a good combo because you learn things better at slow tempos. For example:
--Going up and down the kit in increasing speed. Sometimes I switch hands with a paradiddle
--Bass and hand combinations. I want to get my kick to be more accurate.
--Theres a bridge in Paramore's "Missery business" that is quite challenging because of the velocity, so I practice that.
--Long etc of random stuff...

I usually focus the rest of my time in covers, because I love playing to music, and they teach a lot. Along the way I stop at things I cannot handle. For example:
--A drum fill.
--A groove.
--A transition between grooves or fills.

Sometimes I end with a little bit of impro. Trying to come up with interesting things and keeping them steady is quite challenging for me, but that's the best reason to keep trying.

My best advice is to just start and keep going. No rutine is perfect, mine probably has it's defects. It may help you write a list of goals, songs, etc., so you know what you can focus at and how to measure your results. Also RECORD YOURSELF. I used to think I was awesome until I did lol. But it is key to listen to yourself in order to get better.

Have a great time at the kit!
 

iCe

Senior Member
Regarding how much time to spent, Todd Sucherman (great drummer, check him out) gave the tip that it's not the quantity of time that matters, but the quality. Don't force yourself to practice for an hour when after 30 minutes you're tired and feel like you've made progress.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I'm disadvantaged perhaps but I'm completely self-taught. I learned to play by playing to records. Not the most expedient way to learn but still highly effective.

I would supplement formal lessons with sessions spent jamming along to your favourite records. This will push you to the limit while giving you a foundation on which to play with other musicians.

Good luck!
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Some ideas could probably be shared, but I'd personally need to know a lot more about you to even start making any sort of suggestion.

1) What do you do now?
2) What do you want to be able to do?
3) Do you read?
4) You have any books?
5) Had lessons before? How did that work out?
6) Do you have a kit?
7) Do you have a pad?
9) What amount of practice is realistic for you?
etc. etc...etc..
 
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