Beater angle when it strikes the bass drum head

As far as I can tell, bud, the Tama beaters only adjust for striking angle of the beater head, not the beater itself. Am I missing something?
No, you're not missing anything. I think 50% of people are still thinking this is about the way the beater hits the head as opposed to what we are actually talking about. The other 50% seem to think I'm freaking out about it. It's understandably confusing if you don't read the thread closely, and the title doesn't help.
 

FreDrummer

Silver Member
Anyone noticed that with most pedal setups, in order to hit the bass drum head your beater has to go past 'perpendicular to the floor,' and as such your beater is striking the drum with more of it's top half?

I suppose the solution is to use narrower hoops, or to use something like an axis beater, where you can move the actual beater forward.
Well, Mr. PARCHER, you did raise the issue in your original post.

In the end, a bass drum pedal is nothing more than a series of mechanical linkages and springs put together to propel the selected beater towards a drumhead until it hits said drumhead, which stops it. Whether the shaft goes past vertical by a small amount seems insignificant (usually no more than about 5 degrees?), especially given all the other variables that affect a pedal's feel (footboard angle, beater angle, beater weight, spring tension, quality of bearings and linkages, length of beater shaft). Two simple, surefire ways (without mucking up your hoops) to ensure the shaft does not extend past vertical are:
1. A beater which extends further at the front of the shaft, such as the Tama pictured previously (or, something like the Lowboy with the shaft mounted further back along the shape of the beater).
2. A beater hub which moves the beater shaft closer to the head (which will add "some" small amount of mass to the assembly). This seems like the preferred solution to me, as it would solve the problem using any standard beater.
 
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bud7h4

Silver Member
As far as I can tell, bud, the Tama beaters only adjust for striking angle of the beater head, not the beater itself. Am I missing something?
No, my mistake. I looked at the diagram above, but didn't read your post closely. It looked to me like the beater head in your diagram was meant to rotate vertically, but now I see it actually slides fore and aft.
 

lefty2

Platinum Member
most pedals are designed to go past 90 degrees before impact. If the pedal has a cam shaped sprocket or guide track, and you don't go past 90 with the beater shaft, you're missing most of the cam action. The cam usually doesn't come into play until the end of the stroke.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
If you like the beater to bounce off the drumhead, 90 degrees would give the best rebound.
Beyond that, the beater will be travelling slightly downwards when it hits, so it will want to bounce downwards, but it will be forced to travel upwards because its attached to the shaft. This effect would be subtle, but the further forward from vertical, the more the rebound will be choked.

But I tend to bury the beater, so I get no rebound anyway....
 
S

savage8190

Guest
I just went to a clinic with a very reputable drum tech and funny enough this topic came up. He said that he always adjusts the height of the bass drum so that the beater is hitting flush...that's really the most important consideration. Just thought I'd share.
 

Reggae_Mangle

Silver Member
most pedals are designed to go past 90 degrees before impact. If the pedal has a cam shaped sprocket or guide track, and you don't go past 90 with the beater shaft, you're missing most of the cam action. The cam usually doesn't come into play until the end of the stroke.
I'm not really convinced on this score. the cam is definitely in play before the zero degree mark, just check on any pedal with an eccentric can, it will accelerate before the 0 degree point where beater and head are parallel.
 

Ron_M

Senior Member
Yeah, I wasn't sure which type of cam was being referenced here. An accelerator-style cam has most of the action at the beginning of the stroke, and a standard round cam has a consistent action all the way through the stroke. It's certainly possible, though, depending on the cam design, and I don't pretend to be up on all cam styles.

Part of my interest in this is not just keeping the shaft from moving beyond 90, but also what a heavier head-forward style beater feels like. Might work well with a heel down style.
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
Yeah, I wasn't sure which type of cam was being referenced here. An accelerator-style cam has most of the action at the beginning of the stroke, and a standard round cam has a consistent action all the way through the stroke. It's certainly possible, though, depending on the cam design, and I don't pretend to be up on all cam styles.

Part of my interest in this is not just keeping the shaft from moving beyond 90, but also what a heavier head-forward style beater feels like. Might work well with a heel down style.
Get a beater weight, put it at the top of the shaft.
 

Ron_M

Senior Member
Get a beater weight, put it at the top of the shaft.
Not a bad idea, but it's not the same as weighting the beater forward.

Making a wooden beater head should be a piece of cake, and it can be drilled to add weights, if necessary.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
If you make a wooden beater you can make it weight forward by not drilling in the middle of the beater. Drill more toward the back say 1/3 and 2/3 forward.
Or you can buy a Low Boy beater.
http://lowboybeaters.com
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
Not a bad idea, but it's not the same as weighting the beater forward.

Making a wooden beater head should be a piece of cake, and it can be drilled to add weights, if necessary.
Tape some washers on the face of your beater, get an idea if you like it. Weight fwd isn't a big factor, its the weight itself that you'll feel, not the weights position on the beater.
 

Ron_M

Senior Member
Tape some washers on the face of your beater, get an idea if you like it. Weight fwd isn't a big factor, its the weight itself that you'll feel, not the weights position on the beater.
I'll try that. Washers added to the face vs on top.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Tape some washers on the face of your beater, get an idea if you like it. Weight fwd isn't a big factor, its the weight itself that you'll feel, not the weights position on the beater.
Doesn't that contradict what you said previously about the sonic hammers?

Originally Posted by Les Ismore: "If you put the hammer back against the shaft, SH is a heavy feeling beater, the more the head of the SH beater is away from its beater shaft the lighter it feels."
I actually removed my A21 pedals and have been using A-Longboards because the sonic hammers on the AL pedals feel fantastic.
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
Doesn't that contradict what you said previously about the sonic hammers? /QUOTE]

No, reinforces it.

SH beater fwd, add some weights to the top of the shaft, it'll feel heavy. SONIC HAMMER is not designed like any other beater.

SH beater head fwd, sure it will lighten the feel for obvious reasons, but on a standard beater you can't off center the weight that drastically. The SH is the heaviest beater Im aware of.

What makes any beater feel heavy is the weight, you want that weight on the center of the shaft for the most consistent feel.
 

mitchcortes

New member
Hi, since I like the sound of classic felt beaters I also stumbled on this problem. When the beater shaft goes beyond 90 degrees the beater head hits the drumhead with the top side which is somewhat round, but depending on different beaters can also be pretty sharp.
I looked around for pedals that address this problem and decided to try the yamaha FP8500C. This is one of the few pedals where the beater is closer to the head (sonor balanced has this also). Since it has a felt round beater it should strike the head flat. But after trying it on different kick drums (I own and play several kits depending on the situation/gig) from different brands it looks like the bass drum hoops are a big problem. I encountered different depths, 38mm (older pearl), 40mm (yamaha/vintage premier) and 42mm (tama silverstar). The 38mm hoop seemed to work best regarding this issue. So it's a combined issue of hoop depth and pedal construction.
I read earlier that Trick pedals have a setting to adjust the distance to the drumhead. But these are rather expensive... Are there any other pedals that maybe have this adjustment available?
 

Skilas

Member
What else you do with the beater does not matter. It is important that the footboard has an angle of 13 ° (to the ground) when hitting the head.
 
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CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Why are you concerned with the shaft being parallel to the drum head? That plays no part in the sound, but the beater hitting flush does.
It may not play a part in the sound, but it does in how much you have to push the pedal to get that sound. DW beaters are about square on the hard, plastic side and over time, hitting the head with just the edge will put a notch in the head.
Were it to hit square, that wouldn't happen.

At first, I just tilted my kick back to compensate. Then i got a Low Boy beater that's longer and reaches the head before the shaft is beyond the 90 degrees.
Makes me happy.
 

K Chez

Member
Yes, I wasn't clear. I meant light in feel. My preference is a beater with a higher moment of inertia.

It looks like my danmar beater has a removable head. It wouldn't be too difficult to get a wooden hammer- head together. Maybe time to enlist the help of a friend...
Or you can just do this - "The Sonic Cobra" Wooden Iron Cobra beaters (with the shaft trimmed down) in place of the Sonic Hammer beater heads20190205_104530_sm.jpg
 
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