Bass Drum Wobble

acsunda

Junior Member
Hey guys, question. When I play the kick on my new Slingerland kit, it has a pronounced wobble. I've adjusted the spurs and everything and have minimized it, but I can't seem to get it to sit completely still. It has the original telescoping spurs, that come straight out the sides and are farther back from the front of the kick than more modern spurs. If I replaced those with, say, a set of those Gibraltar spurs that curve toward the front, would that help solve this problem? Thanks in advance!
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Does it wobble side-to-side? That would tell me the spurs are not bracing the shell. When the pedal is installed, it lifts the hoop off the ground. This can compound your problem if the spurs aren’t long enough.
 

acsunda

Junior Member
Does it wobble side-to-side? That would tell me the spurs are not bracing the shell. When the pedal is installed, it lifts the hoop off the ground. This can compound your problem if the spurs aren’t long enough.
Not side to side, front to back.
 

Noisy

Well-known member
Would a sandbag or other weight inside the drum help? Sounds like a Drum did an episode. Some people like the sound change and the extra weight could stabilize your drum, at least for the short run.

Also DW has clamp on spurs that wouldn’t require drilling but could mar your hoop.
 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
might be tilted too far up in front? Footplate pedals will sit level to the floor and pressure on the pedal will flex the hoop if there is too much angle.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
I have a Ludwig Rocker bass drum with similar spurs in a similar location. Mine has the same rocking motion too. It's just a design quirk because they're so far back and so high. I'm eventually going to add aftermarket spurs from Inde that should solve the issue.

Ah the joys of vintage hardware!
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I have a Ludwig Rocker bass drum with similar spurs in a similar location. Mine has the same rocking motion too. It's just a design quirk because they're so far back and so high. I'm eventually going to add aftermarket spurs from Inde that should solve the issue.

Ah the joys of vintage hardware!
So, the three contact points (pedal + 2 spurs) doesn’t create a sort of tripod? Does the shell still rest on the floor?

My first pawnshop Slingy had [rusty] Spurs that clamped to the reso-side hoop. The tom mount clamped to the batter-side hoop. No wobbles, but the tom wiggled a bit.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I have the Slingerland BD size you have and I eventually replaced the old Slingerland spikes with modern bass drum spurs. Yes I altered a vintage drum but who cares if it plays better and is more stable. I had to drill only two extra holes. Their 60's 3ply drums are quite light and if you have a heavy foot they really shake.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Could the spurs or their mounts just be worn and loose? If they move back and forth as the pedal is used, this might be interpreted as a rocking motion.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Make sure the screws that hold the spurs to the shell aren't loose. If you haven't done so, tighten all the adjustments. If they are tight and the spurs are adjusted correctly, but still wobbly, they have these:

 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
So, the three contact points (pedal + 2 spurs) doesn’t create a sort of tripod? Does the shell still rest on the floor?

My first pawnshop Slingy had [rusty] Spurs that clamped to the reso-side hoop. The tom mount clamped to the batter-side hoop. No wobbles, but the tom wiggled a bit.
It does create a tripod, but it is very short because the spurs are much closer to the third (pedal) point and they protrude from the drum fairly high up the shell. So the spurs create a high center of gravity and a short tripod base. Much like when you don't spread the tripod legs on a cymbal stand very far it makes the stand more top heavy and less stable.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Make sure the screws that hold the spurs to the shell aren't loose. If you haven't done so, tighten all the adjustments. If they are tight and the spurs are adjusted correctly, but still wobbly, they have these:

I've often wondered if these cause hoop damage. My thinking is as the drum tries to push forward, the spikes dig in. The pushing forward imparts a rotational force on the hoop because the spikes dont move so this claw actually tries to lift and pull itself off the hoop at the two mounting points. Basically the spikes stay anchored and the mount tries to rotate forward around them, if that makes sense.

I've never used one and dont know anyone who has. But I've always wondered.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I've often wondered if these cause hoop damage. My thinking is as the drum tries to push forward, the spikes dig in. The pushing forward imparts a rotational force on the hoop because the spikes dont move so this claw actually tries to lift and pull itself off the hoop at the two mounting points. Basically the spikes stay anchored and the mount tries to rotate forward around them, if that makes sense.

I've never used one and dont know anyone who has. But I've always wondered.
In my mind it's better to have the force holding the bass drum in place at the bottom center of the reso hoop, the place least likely to cause damage (IMO). If you think about it, every bass drum hit stresses the shell where the spur attaches. And that's been working out all this time. Any cosmetic damage to the hoop...the BD anchor hides it. I had one on a 66 Ludwig kit and it caused no hoop damage, other than cosmetic, Watso-ever. The old timers did it, so that's good enough for me
 
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