Bass drum pedal hitting screw.

Copeland

Active member
Ludwig needs to scale back on the size of the clamp screw. This is outrageous to have to get creative on a brand new pedal. Design flaw.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
What about loosening the clamp a 1/4 turn so the the wing isn't hitting the pedal? You don't have to clamp the pedal to the hoop too much.

The other answer is because it's a Ludwig pedal. 😁


Runs and hides.
Well, these particular Ludwig pedals suck. In a way, Ludwig should just admit it (like Gretsch) and just stop making hardware. They just don’t do it very well anymore.
 
Do you know for sure if the wing screw is OEM? You might want to consider cutting it to make it shorter if all else fails. I remember seeing a photo of on of Ringo's kits with one of these pedals attached to the bass drum. They no longer make these, but the new Atlas Pro isn't a bad pedal for the price. Above idea of shortening the chain is a good one. Also, if you can readjust the beater angle back to about 45 degrees, and independently adjust the foot board to where you are comfortable, the beater should move roughly halfway to the surface of the drumhead when your foot is resting on it, without trying to strike the drum.

Upon further review...That indeed is NOT the original wing screw. See if the Ludwig Parts Catalog has the correct number for that particular model of pedal. If not, run out to the hardware store and see what you can find. Cutting the wing screw might make it too short (?).
 
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Copeland

Active member
Well just now the pedal started barely hitting the enormous wingnut again. So I was just about to start figuring out how to remove chain links, but then I looked across the room at my daughter's junior size drum set. It also has chain pedal for the bass drum. And sure enough, by dumb luck, the portion of her pedal's wingnut that actually screws into the pedal is the exact same size as mine, but without ridiculous size. I swapped them out and now no more dealing with plastic inserts. I can even lower the height of the pedal now to move the beater forward. However, none of this should have been necessary.
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Copeland

Active member
That wing screw is Ludwig OEM. Because all the cymbal stands have the same size wing screws and are identical.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
You can raise your footboard height (via the chain length) and independently adjust beater angle after raising the footboard. On most pedals those 2 adjustments are separate different parts, note the screws in your cam and screws on the bearing housing.
Yes that claw screw is too large but the raised footboard would help.
 

Copeland

Active member
But it's no worry, because now that I have a smaller wing screw, I can lower the pedal while bringing the beater forward with it. Also, I just realized that my spring tension was too tight. It feels like I have better command of the pedal now that I have significantly lowered the tension.
 
I
That wing screw is Ludwig OEM. Because all the cymbal stands have the same size wing screws and are identical.
It looks like someone took that wing screw off one of the stands and put it on the pedal. That's what I meant by OEM. Good to see you've gotten it all sorted out. Have fun!
 

vyacheslav

Senior Member
Glad it ended up working out for you! You could always replace that hoop clamp wing screw with a regular hex head screw from a hardware store (probably 6mm). It would be a pain to have to use a wrench to operate the screw, but it would sure be much less bulky. I've had to do this a few times. At least the option is there.

Also, that's one of only a very few pedals I have ever seen where the spring assembly is on the left side of the pedal. I guess it doesn't matter which side it's on, it's just funny how the right side is always customary. Maybe because most of us are right handed so it's easier to adjust?
 
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