Bass drum kick fustration 16th notes

Hentex

Member
ok, if anyone knows the song radiohead - creep

the 16th notes on the bass drum. on 'ER 3 AND'..

Now i can play this perfect at slow speed, and when i do this song with my teacher after a few mins of practice i seem to get it.

But i find this bass drum pattern so GRRRRRRR because i could do it fine in my lesson, now im home its driving me crazy again. I know exactly what im doing, im slowing it down, then comming back to the songs tempo. But it's not consistant at all. It feels like I get a poor down stroke on the first two strikes and my right hand on the hihat or ride feels weird even tho i get ever stroke 8th note.

I've actully had abit of a problem with 1...2....ER 3...4 which is like the progession before this, i find the ER 3 AND easier, but i dnt get it i learnt it months ago and still cant figure it out.

It's the only thing ive ever found a nitemare in drumming since i started. I can do more complex 16th note bass drum patterns fine :(
 

Hentex

Member
oh.. im practicing on my roland electric kit rather than the proper kit at my tutors, so i dunno maybe thats whats doing my head in, i cant seem to hit the stupid ride softly enuff to stop its bell, god i hate electric! But i cant blame my kit, its only 16th notes it not exactly high end rythem is it..

MORE GRRR
 

Dave_Major

Silver Member
Keep practicing mate.
Also , possibly with help of your teacher, come up with some different grooves, fills, technical exercise using a similar bass drum figure.

Also phil selway almost got fired because he couldnt get it!

Best of luck

Dave
 

Hentex

Member
haha really? damb you wouldnt have thought that!! that actully gives me more hope ;) Thanks dude, ye from tommorow i will play this rythem every day until its nailed! But i need to get this song dialed in a week, or my drum teacher might use his stick in a bad way ;D
 

thedrumninja

Senior Member
Like Dave said, just keep practicing:

Develop your speed with short one bar sprints then work on your endurance by playing for 3-5 minutes at a time. This will boost your control and consistency quite significantly.

If your patient and keep putting the work in it'll come to you eventually.

Good luck man!
 

Duracell

Senior Member
Just some more moral support here. Been drumming for 8 months now and I can never play that beat the whole song through. I always fudge it somewhere along the way. It drives me nuts as well because just like you I can play grooves with a lot more doubles in them than that one.

I really see it as a big weakness in my playing. There are tons of songs in many different genres of music that place a kick double on that same spot.

Good luck practicing!
 

Hentex

Member
Thats why my drum tracher has me hard on this song, he says its quite an important bar to learn. Which i agree it is. Still i did it this morning with my shoes on... that actully helped for the first time thru the song, then i fudged up on the 32note triplets fill and it all went down the pan, so i will have a break for a few hours and try again
 

Stickson

Member
oh.. im practicing on my roland electric kit rather than the proper kit at my tutors, so i dunno maybe thats whats doing my head in, i cant seem to hit the stupid ride softly enuff to stop its bell, god i hate electric!
The Roland bell on the CY-12 and CY-15R is notoriously bad, soft hits not an option. There is a fix for this available if you do a search for it but it requires voiding the warranty and needs a little bit of nerve to do it. Still, I did it (and I'm useless when it comes to DIY) and ever since the bell has been brilliant. Even soft triplets now work fine.
 

JT1

Silver Member
I know this might sound strange but it sometimes works. If you've been playing a beat over and over and have been concentrating on it so hard you start to lose it more and more. Get up off your stool, do a stretch or two, grab a glass of water just to give you a small break. Then get back on your kit and don't say right I'm going to do it, just give it a shot but don't concentrate on the part that is giving you trouble, focus on something else instead like the accents on your hi hat or how hard you are hitting the snare drum.

Concentrating too hard on one part of a drum beat can really affect the part you are trying to play, it used to be like that for me with double bass patterns so I would stop thinking about it and just do it, if you relax and don't focus on it too much, you should get it a lot faster. I know this sounds strange but I'm sure many will know what I'm suggesting.

Also I find with over-concentration that you can start hitting things too hard so lower the volume and play lighter you might find yourself being a lot more accurate that way.

Relaxation and a clear mind should do the trick.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
I know this might sound strange but it sometimes works. If you've been playing a beat over and over and have been concentrating on it so hard you start to lose it more and more. Get up off your stool, do a stretch or two, grab a glass of water just to give you a small break. Then get back on your kit and don't say right I'm going to do it, just give it a shot but don't concentrate on the part that is giving you trouble, focus on something else instead like the accents on your hi hat or how hard you are hitting the snare drum.

Concentrating too hard on one part of a drum beat can really affect the part you are trying to play, it used to be like that for me with double bass patterns so I would stop thinking about it and just do it, if you relax and don't focus on it too much, you should get it a lot faster. I know this sounds strange but I'm sure many will know what I'm suggesting.

Also I find with over-concentration that you can start hitting things too hard so lower the volume and play lighter you might find yourself being a lot more accurate that way.

Relaxation and a clear mind should do the trick.
The key is to learn the difference between being "focussed" and being "tense", both physically and mentally. The two couldn't be more different. But first we have to learn what they taste like.
 

JT1

Silver Member
The key is to learn the difference between being "focussed" and being "tense", both physically and mentally. The two couldn't be more different. But first we have to learn what they taste like.
Yeah sorry if it didn't seem clear what I was trying to say, I feel that one can lead to the other e.g. over concentrating can bring on tension.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Yeah sorry if it didn't seem clear what I was trying to say, I feel that one can lead to the other e.g. over concentrating can bring on tension.
I know what you're getting at, and I agree. You were clear, I was just following on your train of thought.
 
N

nhzoso

Guest
A few years ago when I tried this song it did the same ting to me. I really have not played it in awhile so I think I will give it a go tonight to see how it goes. I remember getting it but then got into a jam band and have been concentrating on other songs. I am interested to see how I do on this.

I remember my instructor had me practice the beat slooowly while playing 1/4 notes, 8th notes and 16th notes on the hat and ride till I got it.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Dropping those bass drum hits in between the eighth notes on the hat is an independence problem that probably goes back to the very first rock beats. Heck, when I was starting out the beat that kept screwing me up was "Pour Some Sugar On Me" by Def Leppard, with the two sixteenth notes right on the a-three.

Best thing to do to get this is to realize where the various notes fall. To some extent it becomes a groove that switches between unison and linear patterns, where for a brief second each limb moves in succession rather than together. If you read music or tab, you can visually see this.

I drop the snare hand out when working on an independence problem between my right hand and right foot, because they tend to want to do similar things. I slow it way the heck down and concentrate more on the hi-hat. One of the truths I've always subscribed to is to keep the hat steady in rock music. That way you're free to follow the melody or bassline with your other limbs as appropriate.

Keep at it, and like the other poster said, if you start getting burned out, work on something else for a while or take a break. I stopped playing Def Leppard songs for some time and after a few months that groove seemed a lot easier all of a sudden!
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
I remember my instructor had me practice the beat slooowly while playing 1/4 notes, 8th notes and 16th notes on the hat and ride till I got it.
This is pretty much how I figured out that beat. I started my right hand playing the 16ths on the hats...I found this much easier for the right foot to then follow suit. Once you're comfortable with your footwork, drop the 16ths back to 8ths on the hats and you're done. Keep it as slow as you need to until you get it down.
 

deftdrummer

Junior Member
Many of the best drummers mimic what they are doing with their hands with their feet. It helps build speed and efficiency until you can drop beats on both the hands and feet to make something unique as other have been saying.
 

Hentex

Member
AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I do the whole song vertully floorless yesterday, today i go back to iron it out. And i cant do it at all!

I cant even play it at a problem childs tempo, what the hell is up with my muscle memory!? I was super happy, now im super F'ed-off.

What a waste of my day, play time, and lesson money.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
As with many, many other things, the harder you push yourself, the less likely you'll be able to do is flawlessly. The biggest thing I can tell you, if you did manage to do it correctly once, is... relax. Stressing about playing it won't help you play it.
 
Top