Band wants to move to a silent stage.

See if you can get them to start with custom mold in-ear monitors. After they see that those will allow them to personally control how little/much drums they hear they might not object to keeping the acoustic drums...

Personally, I could possibly adjust to using electronic drums exclusively if I absolutely had to, but there's no way I could let go of real cymbals. Even if the music is great, if I couldn't express myself with my touch and nuance on the instrument, it would no longer be great for me.
I haven't tried the new Zildjian edrums but the cymbals sound amazing. And because they're actually metal, they reputedly feel like the real thing.
 
I've suggested this with my band and we're considering it....
I'm (one of the few) not bothered by playing e-drums live - I can only practice on e drums at home so been playing them for years and I'm used to it. I've been on iems for years too.
As others have mentioned - the pa needs to be up to it.
Here in the UK they keep putting new housing estates up all around venues (that have had music for years) and then complaining about the noise so many more db limiters appearing and I would rather play a (decent) e kit with gusto than hold back tippy tap on an a kit watching that red light creep up all night rather than enjoying myself.
Coupled with the easier gear schlep as I get older - it's beginning to look like a no brainer 🤷‍♂️
 
I'm a situation close to that. My band plays more and more BUT in small venues, electric kit is what I play in those situations. Except that what was once exceptional is becoming the rule : playing Vdrums.
I play a Roland TD-11, it's fine to rehearse with but really sounds weak once in a pub / restaurant. And it's a pain for me to play!
I've got a nice Premier Signia and Sabian AA sleeping in here and I play concerts on plastic junk! Sound is no good and visual no good either.
I was wondering about sub amp. I'm also planing to get a Roland VAD second hand market. But the lack of dynamic on stage and lack of oomph bother me.
 
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I would see if they would be willing to do an all-silent stage except for the drums and everyone using IEM's. I've seen several bands do this with great success.
 
I still see big ol' 50w guitar amps miked on small stages in small venues all over the place. Makes no sense to me.
 
I've seen full silent stage bands with the best equipment etc. and it sounded totally lifeless - like elevator music. Real drums and small amps would have sounded much much better than the sterile e-kits with no stage presence.

A good friend of mine who plays guitar told me that it took him a decade or so to realize that you don't need a huge half-stack to get a good sound out of an electric guitar. There are so many smaller amps that sound just as good (if not better) than a large box of speakers for just one guitar, and I believe he is absolutely correct. He had one of those boutique amps that was deafening on 1.5. It sounded great, but it was so freakin' loud and it was a relatively small amp.
 
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My 7-piece band is split on IEMs.
Eg. one singer has tried molded IEMs with an expert sound tech and never could get comfortable with them - weird ear issues etc. The keyboard player just uses his own amp - no monitor - and can hear everyone just fine in most cases (unless we are on a huge stage - then he would take a monitor).
If we went the IEM route, we'd probably have to practice with everyone wearing IEMs.. not just on stage. Also if you want to send individual mixes using IEMs you need a digital board that can support all that.. so rough estimate 10K for molded IEMs for all band members and probably 2-3K for an upgraded digital board. A big investment for sure..
I'm going to experiment with a hard wired solution for my own personal monitor - the Sennheisser/Shure/KZ or Drumeo IEM (corded) with my old Behringer mixer (XLR in from monitor cable/tape in for phone audio or click). That's at least under $100 to try it out. I have a small travel case it will all fit in nice and compact.. it will make a good backup plan if the stage mix is not working out. Usually we use our own sound guy.. or we do our own sound.. with great results. its the odd cases where the venue does the sound or we have to use an unfamiliar sound tech and things can go off the rails.
 
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What about an acoustic kit with mesh heads, triggers, and a EAD10? Maybe keep regular cymbals with a single overhead.

Ad your own small personal mixer that can take a FOH feed and let the rest of the band do whatever they want.

You could be done with less than 2k$
 
Silent stage and full IEM was another Healy first in the concert industry by the Grateful Dead

“In a radical, if ultimately unpopular move, he proposed in May 1992 that they remove all amps and monitors from the stage. The reasoning was that there was only so much that an engineer could do if he was working with sound coming from a mass of speakers all lined up: bleeding between amps and mics and feedback issues from monitors placed a limit on the sound quality.

All the amps were thereafter kept in isolated chambers under the stage, running from there to both the soundboard and the monitor mixing console. Unfortunately, replacing the stage equipment with customizable in-ear monitors ultimately led to musicians isolating themselves, and was unpopular with fans in the front who liked the palpable rush of sound from the stage amps.”

Here's an interview from 1992:

“And now we're into our seventh or eighth-generation sound system. And we're so many years ahead of everybody else." The band has recently unveiled their lateest wrinkle.

"We've gotten rid of all the loudspeakers on the stage, which is really another monumental step," Healy says of the newest innovations. "The band uses earphones, but they're extremely high quality. They come and make molds of your ears and they build these things to fit inside of your ear. Sort of like what the newspeople wear, only a real high-end audio quality version of it.

They're stereo, one for each ear. Each musician can make his own stereo mix. And it's just being developed right now. We're developing the software to do computerized mixing and stuff like that, so we've removed all of the monitor speakers and all of the instrument speakers from the stage. Now, if I shut off the sound system, you don't hear anything except for the drummers on the stage. All the sound comes out of the sound system.

"The advantage is that the monitors were so dense and so complex on the stage that it was like standing knee deep in mud. As a sound mixer, I could only be so subtle. Below that threshold, I was continuously plagued with resonances and feedback and stuff. I could only go so far and then I might as well go into the dressing room, sit down and drink a beer.

"But lo and behold, it turns out that the same thing were causing different sets of complaints with the band members. So collectively we realized that we've got to get rid of the speakers on the stage. We've now known that for a long time. So in wonderful, wonderful Grateful Dead fashion [this past May in Sacramento] we jumped right off into no speakers and it worked.

"You've got to keep doing it," he says. "I mean, I don't ever stop. I'm never satisfied. I mean, every concert is good, but I'm already scheming on what I can do better, and we start planning the next show."
 
I'm going to experiment with a hard wired solution for my own personal monitor - the Sennheisser or Shure IEM (corded) with my very small mixer wired to the board. Can plug in a click as well and balance the levels. That's at least under $200 to try it out.
I use KZs (corded) into a small Rolls amp, and it works great for me. (I do use a 6' headphone extension cable so that I'm not tied "that" close to the monitor. It's more than I need, but finding a 3' extension isn't likely, and for $6, I'll manage the extra length... heheheh)

The KZs are much less expensive than the Shures. And you can buy replacement cords, keeping the same drivers, for...wait for it... $6 ;) I still have a set of Shure 215s as a backup, I used them a couple weeks ago while I was waiting for my replacement KZ cords to arrive, and I realized how much more I liked the KZs. The Shures are fine, but I like the KZs better, and they're half the price. With replaceable cords!

I have my own iPad that's connected to the house mix so I can adjust my mix as well, beyond adjusting the over-all volume with the Rolls.

Now realize that I'm playing bars for the most part, and not high end, BIG venues. But this combination has worked really well for me for years. I would suggest that to anyone before investing BIG dollars in custom fit stuff, and not knowing if you'll even like using in-ears...
 
I'm not opposed to the idea of adding an e-kit in my arsenal for certain gigs, but if I was in a band who were attempting to make that decision for me permanently, I'd personally feel a bit stifled and resentful...not trying to stir the pot, and I admire you for wanting to hang in there, but can't they quiet themselves way down first and see how it goes from there? It seems a bit unequal for them to just decide that for everyone. The truth is, it's currently much easier and cheaper for guitarists to adopt quieter stage means, and the equipment is generally much better as well. I've not been sold on the sound of 1 e-kit I've heard or played in person, and for the price tag? End of story.

I work in recording and have also worked in sound for venues, I hear rumbling of it becoming standard practice, although it hasn't for me locally yet, fortunately. I honestly hope it fizzles out in a few years, when the remaining people who are interested in live music start missing more spontaneity and organic sounds. I think there's a lot of things small venues can do before adopting the silent stage approach for drums entirely...not saying it can't work in certain situations, but I don't think it's the savior that some think it is. More than noise complaints, it's the astronomical operating costs (rent, especially) and lack of small business protections that's hurting live music...
 
A good friend of mine who plays guitar told me that it took him a decade or so to realize that you don't need a huge half-stack to get a good sound out of an electric guitar. There are so many smaller amps that sound just as good (if not better) than a large box of speakers for just one guitar, and I believe he is absolutely correct. He had one of those boutique amps that was deafening on 1.5. It sounded great, but it was so freakin' loud and it was a relatively small amp.
"Layla" was recorded on a teensy lil Fender Tweed Champ.
 
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Guys, nothing to beat yourselves up about! Trust me guitarists and bassists hate it just as much as we do. My mate is a classically trained pianist and he has the same rant about keyboards. Those poor sods have decades on us!
 
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