Band being unreasonable?

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Well a lot of time the drums may sound like crap behind the kit but sound great in front. Do you have a recording or did sound guy comment. I agree with PorkPie and I'd just tune the snare to taste, listen to toms pick one or two that sound musical and play your heart out. I was watching a dude play on a kit at a music store that was tuned for chips but he still sounded great -so even on poorly tuned drums you can sound great is something to consider.
this has happened to me sooo many times in my non punk bands. Get to the show, sit down behind a "kit" with Duct Tape brand heads, and think "oh gawd"...but then at soundcheck it is like magic....
 

TMe

Senior Member
IMO, your cymbals and your snare is about 90% of your sound anyways. As long as the kick goes "thump" when you hit it, who cares?
That's why I ended up playing snare and bass for Hardcore Punk. Once it goes through a PA, a bass drum is a bass drum, so I didn't mind using a borrowed kick. Combine that with your own decent cymbals and a snare drum that sings, and you're laughing.

I'm thinking about going back to that, just because bar stages are so teeny these days.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I'm thinking about going back to that, just because bar stages are so teeny these days.
You're not kidding! Just about every place I play is cramped these days. I played around 35 gigs this past year, I think I can count the number of times on one hand where I had ample space for a kit with a 22" kick, a 12" rack tom, and a 16 floor tom. Even when we play outside, the area they have for the band is usually cramped. Right now, I play a 20, 12, 14 with two crashes, ride, and hats in an ideal setting. More times than not, I swear I'm foregoing the rack tom and one of the crashes.

 

TMe

Senior Member
Right now, I play a 20, 12, 14 with two crashes, ride, and hats in an ideal setting.
No cowbell?

More seriously, I've been wondering if I should learn to use a double kick pedal if I do start using a 2-piece again. That sounds like a lot of work.
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
I will never get all these gear issues..

Just play..:)

Basically all my gigs are on my own set (because 99,9% of the times there is no other band), but for example januari 1 i have a gig where i can use the set from the drummer that plays after us..

Not even mandatory, but the guy gave the option himself, since there is only a 15-20 minutes break between us and them..

My only question was if there will be a bassdrum, tom and floortom..

I will bring my own snaredrum, cymbals and stands, bassdrum pedal and a throne..

I really couldnt care less what sort of bassdrum, tom and floortom (or drumheads) will be there..

Even if i would have to play the complete gig on a crap set with some cheap PST cymbals, no problem..

Like i said, just go sit and play..:)
 

Mustion

Senior Member
I will say that
I will never get all these gear issues..

Just play..:)
Yeah, I've always been told that "a great drummer sounds great on any kit". But sometimes there is a drum set that's just not that playable, though. I've been subjected to my share of them, and it's about as enjoyable as playing bass through a blown speaker or a guitar through a cable with an intermittent short in it.
 

danondrums

Well-known member
I will never get all these gear issues..
You really never went through a period where you lacked perhaps some level of confidence and really needed everything to be "just right" in order to feel as comfortable as possible? I know I did. I didn't start playing drums until a little later in life (20) and then started gigging only a few months after. It was kind of frightening and having all of my own stuff sure helped with feeling at ease. For me, the amount of my own gear that I needed at each gig could be graphed linearly to this point where I'm down to just finally needing only a pair of sticks to feel adequately prepared.

I understand and agree with your sentiment, but I like looking at it from an angle as an opportunity for growth rather than an "incorrect feeling."
 
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Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I learned to get over it the years where I was touring in a van, playing show after show. some nights it was my kit, more nights it was whatever was there. I actually loved it b/c it was a new challenge every night, and I was seeing how I could survive...but it also made the songs a bit different every night, and that kept things fresh. Thee were 3 shows where the set was a lefty set up....so I learned to play open as well as crossed....
 

rmac86

Member
Thanks for all the responses guys, some good advice here.

The only real question I would have is how do you all feel about spending (usually) large amounts of money, investment of countless hours tuning the drums to sound amazing then realising that you might never play them live?

This drives me stone mad and I’ve had professional drummers come up to me at these shared kit gigs asking “what’s wrong with your sound? Can’t you tune a drum kit??” And so on. Damn embarrassing if you ask me and I always question why some other drummers let others play such terrible equipment.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
The only real question I would have is how do you all feel about spending (usually) large amounts of money, investment of countless hours tuning the drums to sound amazing then realising that you might never play them live?

This drives me stone mad and I’ve had professional drummers come up to me at these shared kit gigs asking “what’s wrong with your sound? Can’t you tune a drum kit??” And so on. Damn embarrassing if you ask me and I always question why some other drummers let others play such terrible equipment.
First off, a pro would never come up to you on a shared kit gig where everything is miced up and say you can't tune a kit. That is anything but professional and my own personal reply to a remark like that wouldn't be very professional either.

Secondly, it sounds like you're a little OCD with tuning. Remember live there's lots of factors that have a negative effect on your sound, you just have to roll with it. I have my kit tuning saved on a phone app and check it's in at the start of a gig. (I haven't done a shared bill for years and only play my own kit). You're gonna encounter some absolutes pigs of beater kits on the original circuit. As others have said just put your snare and cymbals on and enjoy it. Thank your bassist that he saved you having to watch your kit get smashed up by other drummers.

If you only want to play your own drums, join a covers band.
 

Polska

Member
Enjoying myself, and mutual respect among band members is a must-have for me in a band. If one of those is missing and it can't be changed, I'm leaving.
 

Channing

Member
And my point about bandmates never understanding the struggle of drummers shows itself immediately!!!
A guitarist gets his/her own strings, body, neck, pickup and everything their hands and pick touch is their very own instrument that they practice on all of the time. The drummer gets sticks and literally every single thing we strike is different than anything we've ever played before. Spring pedal tension, different, throne height, different, head type and tuning different cause different rebound characteristics. Every. Single. Thing. Different. : A throne sitting at a different height would be like simply taking 1/2" out of a guitarists torso. The hands line up differently on the instrument and they will be uncomfortable.

Of course, this is really only the case in the original music scene. This is why I think most drummers should aim to play in cover bands playing 3-4 hours/night on your own gear instead of the original music scene which mostly consists of singer/songwriters putting out pretty boring songs with even less thoughtful rhythms than the ones on the radio.
For me the worst thing is the pedal. I won’t use anyone else’s pedal. I also won’t let anyone else use mine after a bad experience once when someone adjusted my pedal at a gig. It’s a trick drums pro 1v so it’s direct drive and the adjustments on it aren’t at all like a dw or an iron cobra or whatever people are used to playing with, so of course by the time he got done messing with it it wasn’t really playable in any sense and then I had to spend like 20 minutes adjusting it to get it back to some playable condition. I think in a shared drum situation there are some things you shouldn’t expect to borrow and just bring your own, and for me a pedal is one of them, maybe even more so than cymbals.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
The only real question I would have is how do you all feel about spending (usually) large amounts of money, investment of countless hours tuning the drums to sound amazing then realising that you might never play them live?
To me, the word to concentrate on here using "never." Listen, if you stick with this drumming thing long enough, you will have PLENTY of opportunities to set up and tear town your own kit. There will be times you wish they provided a back line so you can just grab your cymbals, snare, and other randomness and go.

This drives me stone mad and I’ve had professional drummers come up to me at these shared kit gigs asking “what’s wrong with your sound? Can’t you tune a drum kit??”
A.) Real professionals concentrate on the playing, not on the instrument. No real "pro" will say this. Ever.

B.) If this does happen and you feel the need to defend yourself, all you need to say is "It's a backline kit." Any drummer worth his/her salt will understand this because we've all been there. If they don't understand this, they aren't a pro.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I use the 80/20 rule. If the band has 80% of what I want and 20% what I don't want, it's acceptable. The 20% needs to be...I prefer the term worked around. I find it applies to buying houses and evaluating relationships too. If it's less than 80% good, only then should the door is open for other possibilities.

Everyone has to endure something to be in a band. To complain about the 20%...Complainers in real life are annoying. Don't announce a problem, announce the solution to the problem. Bam. Nothing wrong with trying to change things that aren't agreeable but treading lightly and delicately with tact and respect for other's feelings is needed.

Also I think it should be encouraged to complain HERE and just weather the issues out THERE, until the emotion is siphoned off and a proper response...or not...can be offered. This is a great place to vent, because everyone needs a place to let the negatives get out in the light of day. It sucks having no place to complain. It's safe here.
 
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Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
I don't play punk, but my first reaction is: out front does anyone really listen to how your drums sound? It's not exactly a quiet jazz ensemble with high tom tunings and a lot of comping on snare lol.

I play jazz and blues, and most music venues for those genres also have a backline kit. Most festivals do, too. For those, I still bring my own throne, kick pedal, snare, and cymbals. That solves issue with throne height and kick pedal action. I also get my own sound from my own snare and cymbals. I'm still using house "kit". Problem solved.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
I don't play punk, but my first reaction is: out front does anyone really listen to how your drums sound? It's not exactly a quiet jazz ensemble with high tom tunings and a lot of comping on snare lol.

I play jazz and blues, and most music venues for those genres also have a backline kit. Most festivals do, too. For those, I still bring my own throne, kick pedal, snare, and cymbals. That solves issue with throne height and kick pedal action. I also get my own sound from my own snare and cymbals. I'm still using house "kit". Problem solved.
It's not just the music. It's how his band is responding to his concerns.

I always find it curious that drummers are often treated like backup musicians rather than an actual integral part of the band. Try playing punk without him.
 

JUZZI

Active member
Seems I have a habit of picking the wrong group...

Been playing with a group for about 6 months now and it was going largely well until recently. The last couple of gigs being punk gigs mainly meant the drummers didn’t tune their kits. So other than occasionally being allowed to use my own snare drum I’ve had to use whatever kit is supplied therefore I sound turd. I complained about this to the group and they just said I should bring my own kit next time, which I did but only to be told there’s a kit there and nothing is to be moved/changed, queue another appalling gig.

Lesson learned, next gig I got in touch with the other band and agreed that I would supply the kit, which they were more than happy about. In the background my bassist is having talks with the organisers of the event and basically tells them to ignore my request and that all other drummers are only to bring breakables.. cue further annoyance 😡

Thinking about leaving this group as I’m clearly not getting listened to, however I’m torn as I actually like the material and the other members are very likeable.

What would you do?

Thanks,

R
It's rule of thumb for the head line band to supply the back line including the drum kit, support band drummers should really be expected to use the kit supplied (besides bring their own snare/cymbals ..etc). However if you feel it's always risky due to their incorrect tuning then I see why you'd want to suggest providing your own kit instead.

As a drummer new to the gigging scene I am just getting used to this situation myself. There is nothing worse than getting to the set up and having to play on a terrible, nonadjustable piece of s*** kit. As I found in my very first gig.

I do thing it's kinda wrong for your bassist to undermine you like that. If you like being in the band and get on with the others then it would be a shame to leave. It sounds like you just need to pull this guy to one side and have a stern word. Make it clear how you feel and that you are even considering leaving because of the matter and then he may listen.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
After playing in punk bands for years I play some small stages and bizzar venues. When you have 4 bands on a bill you can't have 4 full kits, 4 sets of 2 guitar and bass amp kicking around. Gear sharing is a MUST.

Breakables are usually necessary, snare, cymbals, sticks, pedals. but someone provides a kit. Now. If it's me or someone else I don't really care, as I hate hauling gear. Because of this if it sounds like crap, I am willing to accept it, plus all the other bands will sound band and the next time I won't use that house kit or bands kit.

With that said, most of the punk drummers in this city, myself included can tune a kit really well and don't have "punk" gear. So I have been really lucky. If it's a house kit i'll talk to the other drummers and one of us will tune em up.

If it's another bands kit and it sound terrable just ASK them if you can give it a quick tune. If they don't know how, they won't mind at all. If they know how it shouldn't sound that band.

At least the FOH guy will eq, gate, and compress them so it doesn't sound as bad as you think. They scoop out the over tones and mids plus the gutiars will be cranked out front. If you are not mic'd up, ,thats another story.


I too know all too well about 15 minute change overs with my metal band. I can do it in 5 setting up my own kit with the prior band doing a quick tear down as I am ready on the side of the stage with my kit "preped" to drop in place. The issue is the previous bands taking way too long causing the later bands to have to cut their sets short.


Gear sharing is great, just ask to tune the drums, offer to bring your own, or live with it. If your band has an issue with that they obviously don't care about the sound and to me that is a red flag.
 
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