Band Auditions..........Video Links To Own Playing Needed?

mikyok

Platinum Member
Has anyone else come across this?

After 7/8 years I find myself on the hunt for another regular gig. Still keeping with the functions purely for the cash.

Every ad I've replied to has asked for video links to my playing as well as inviting me for an audition. I really can't stand youtube drummers at the best of times as the vast majority are editted to cover any flaws. Also how do you show you can lock in with their bassist when you've never even met them? Surely 'chops' vids are the last thing you're looking for when you're after a pocket player and playing to a backing track is nothing like playing with a band.

I've taken the nice approach and explained that I'm a busy gigging drummer and haven't had the time to make a video, I've got the auditions off experience. January is going to be fun auditioning for new bands for the first time in ages.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
It's the nature of the thing these days. I know for certain that bands will review my FB page and look at pics and video. Some bands are very concerned with appearance and image, others not so much.

But you don't need a "professional" demo reel -- just set up a camera at your next gig. Play a short groove at soundcheck. Definitely smile! I'd recommend a Zoom Q2N.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Well, maybe the band(s) you've contacted are extremely vain and want a drummer with a stunningly beautiful kit that's been well-maintained, not some pawn shop 2-piece. Maybe they want a guy with long hair who whips it all around while playing (you do that, right?) like that dude in Japan (who broke his neck while performing). Or maybe they expect their new drummer to have amazing recording and production skills so they can utilize those skills for free.

Regardless, they want to see a recording before meeting someone, not hear (Soundcloud wasn't mentioned). They're looking for something specific.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Well, maybe the band(s) you've contacted are extremely vain and want a drummer with a stunningly beautiful kit that's been well-maintained, not some pawn shop 2-piece. Maybe they want a guy with long hair who whips it all around while playing (you do that, right?) like that dude in Japan (who broke his neck while performing). Or maybe they expect their new drummer to have amazing recording and production skills so they can utilize those skills for free.

Regardless, they want to see a recording before meeting someone, not hear (Soundcloud wasn't mentioned). They're looking for something specific.
Well my kit is definitely better looking than me. Long hair was about 14 years ago before my hairline retreated across the top of my head at a rate of knots!
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
They're looking for something specific.
Very probably they are, but don't let the focus on appearance worry you. In the entertainment biz, most bands and agents are looking for talented, young, slender, attractive people. And when that doesn't work out, they hire older, experienced, responsible, nice musicians.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
It makes sense to me to want a video.

With potentially hundreds of drummers available for every gig, no one wants to meet with every single potential candidate. One needs a method of eliminating the pretenders and the under-qualified and focus on just meeting the top candidates.

But I don't think anyone's expecting a top quality slick production video, just a video of one playing. Even just a video of you at your local pub on a gig.

Making video is so easy these days, it's not exactly rocket science anymore.
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
That's how it goes now. And it's not like it's new. I remember having to film and send VHS tapes to people back in the late 90's early 20's before it was easy to film and upload online.
Just about every gig I get asked to do comes along with the "please send video and social medial links."
Most of the time they just want to know you can play, especially if it's a person or group that doesn't already have first hand knowledge of you.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I'll send my bands albums, or video links if asked. Not uncommon at all. When we auditioned bass players a few years back we SHOULD have done this. Wasted a ton of time with people who seemed to have plenty of experience, good gear, previous bands, and couldn't play the parts. Our music is pretty techy, but when we send you tabs and mp3's before you try out you SHOULD know if you are capable or not.

I joined a band a few years back and they told me they had tried out 15 drummers before I came along. I'm not tooting my own horn because they said at least 6 of them could barely play at all, but in the emails leading up to auditions they talked the talk and said it would be no problem. Once again they were sent the albums, and had WEEKS to prepare. Maybe it's just me, but If I cant keep up to a backing track AT ALL I would have a hard time trying out for that band in person.

THIS is the reason people want video. Too many over confident, under skilled players. On the flip side, with video, I could find someone with ZERO experience that can play everything and more.. It's similar to job interviews having future employees write an exam as part of the hiring/interview process. Too many guys in IT will cheat and write certifications yet have no experience in the field. They get hired on Certs and most likely a DR'd resume and now you're stuck with em. Writing a challenging an exam weeds out the crap.

Plus, keep the videos, and if you come across this again you are ahead of the game. Plus videoing yourself is a great way to spot things and improve.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
That's how it goes now. And it's not like it's new. I remember having to film and send VHS tapes to people back in the late 90's early 20's before it was easy to film and upload online.
Just about every gig I get asked to do comes along with the "please send video and social medial links."
Most of the time they just want to know you can play, especially if it's a person or group that doesn't already have first hand knowledge of you.
A venue I played at a couple of weeks ago recorded the last 20 minutes of the set.

Packed venue with lights, house pa and everything miced up. Crisis averted!
 
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