Back to basics?

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
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First book and still in use today. I don't do it front to back or anything but it's so basic and has good ideas that it's great for reading practice and independence and all sorts of things. Sometimes if I'm in a rut or something I'll pull this out and find an interesting beat on one of the pages and play around with it for inspiration and to get away from the same ol'.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Pablo Casals, the great cellist, practiced scales into his 80's, asked why he replied "I'm beginning to notice some improvement"
A humble view.

For me, sustaining my incorporation of rudiments into my sessions after all these years is not only a means of paying ongoing tribute to the elements of drumming; it's a practical way to keep my strokes in shape. When I devote time to my practice pad, everything I do behind a drum set becomes significantly easier.
 

TJK

Well-known member
Haskell W. Harr's Drum Method, Book One. It's the book I started out on with my first instructor, a professional studio drummer, back in the '80s. The exercises are snare-drum specific and are utterly elementary. I pull it out just for nostalgic fun sometimes. It was originally published in the '30s. Attached is an image of the cover.

I remember beating the dog shit out of the front cover when I finally got through it.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I remember beating the dog shit out of the front cover when I finally got through it.
Ha! A celebratory beating or one of frustration? I was but a lad when I completed the book. I loved every page of it. Fun from start to finish for me. A lot of that had to do with my instructor, a truly great guy.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
I recently cracked open Rod Morgenstein's Drumset Warm-ups book, and realized I should have done it much sooner. I was prompted by seeing an ad for a new project by Winger of all things.
 
My teacher has me always do in my practice the things we have worked on since I started. I spend an hour or so going through all that then maybe an hour or two doing my new lesson stuff then i jam to my iPhone.
 

specgrade

Senior Member
My first lesson came from Rick James _Street Songs_ record. "Getto Life" changed mine, lol.
Haskell Harr was a book my second instructor gave me and I lost it, kinda.
 

MrTheOne

Member
Has anyone gone back to an early instruction book - maybe your first one of you still have it - and played the parts and exercises? Does it help reinforce the basics of reading, and does it feel refreshing, or a boring waste of time?

I'm thinking about doing that with my original books dating back to 1965! I know it's not a big deal to grab a pad, sticks & book and find out for myself, I just wondered what the consensus is.

Bermuda
Stick Control. Since I’m late to the SC party (never owned a copy in 20-odd years of playing) I can’t really go back to basics, but I finally bought a copy and have been working i it, and I find it more than lives up to it’s reputation. You can play through it as written and get lots out of it, but then find creative ways to work in it and get even more from it. Truly a must-own for drummers.
 

GOOSE72

Well-known member
To answer the original question no. I had those books and then thought wow they were written by people just like us. Maybe I can come up with something original like they did. So I scraped the books.
 

adamosmianski

Senior Member
Haskell W. Harr's Drum Method, Book One. It's the book I started out on with my first instructor, a professional studio drummer, back in the '80s. The exercises are snare-drum specific and are utterly elementary. I pull it out just for nostalgic fun sometimes. It was originally published in the '30s. Attached is an image of the cover.
This was my first book too. That cover takes me back.
 

adamosmianski

Senior Member
Truth be told, I never really finished Stick Control though I spent years on some sections. Maybe that is where I need to go back to. Good idea.
One does not finish Stick Control, Daniel-san. :)

I think a lot of people spend years (or lifetimes) on certain sections and never get to the rest of the book, which is a shame because the whole thing is good. Often, in an effort to battle decision fatigue, I'll just go through Stick Control top to bottom. Play a handful of exercises each day at whatever tempo(s) is comfortable, and don't look back. Could they be improved? Of course! But I just plow on the next day, playing the next handful of exercises. It's a great way to force yourself to play a lot of different things and just keep your hands moving.
 

adamosmianski

Senior Member
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First book and still in use today. I don't do it front to back or anything but it's so basic and has good ideas that it's great for reading practice and independence and all sorts of things. Sometimes if I'm in a rut or something I'll pull this out and find an interesting beat on one of the pages and play around with it for inspiration and to get away from the same ol'.
I had this one too! The nostalgia is deep today!
 
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