Automatic Drum Tuner

wang974

Member
How's it going! My name is Alex, and I am the co founder of a McMaster University startup company. We made a prototype device that automatically tune a drum into perfect pitch. We are doing some market research and wondering if you would like to check out the prototype.

The current prototype is able to accommodate 6 lug drums with size of 10' to 18'. And user can customize the tuning setting (overall pitch of the drum and pitch of each individual lugs). We are still figuring out a way to accommodate drums with different lugs. But six lug system covers most popular tom drums.
Here's a demo video for the first prototype:
https://goodfortunelark.wixsite.com/lark. We are working on a second prototype and would love you to try it! Please connect me with your questions,opinions and suggestions of this product and for a chance to win 1 of 4 $50 Long Mcquead giftcards!
Thank you for your time!
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
There's also a this device that does the same thing:

__tuner1.jpg
 
Last edited:

rustyfingers

Senior Member
I got an instant fishing warning when I went to that site (I use Webroot). I just blocked it for my whole organization.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
There's also a this device that does the same thing:
Similar in that it tightens all lugs at the same time. But with servo controlled motors doing each one the control unit can make judgements as to individual tension. Mechanically that would be difficult and require individual torque wrenches.

But as I posted in the other thread, even tension does not equal even tuning as those with drum dials can attest to. To be really good you need to be able to tune each lug to pitch to “clear” each lug so somewhere in this new contraption it need the ability to listen to the pitch of each lug individually. Tunebot tries to do this but Resotune is much much more accurate in this regard.
 

wang974

Member
Guess you don't know about this:

Hi There,
what's different of our device is that it has a built in frequency detection algorithm, and motors that automatically turn the lugs based on the pitch detected. The user just need to select the pitch they want and simply place the device on the drum and the device will automatically tune it to the desired pitch.
 

wang974

Member
There's also a this device that does the same thing:

View attachment 88003
Hi There,
what's different of our device is that it has a built in frequency detection algorithm, and motors that automatically turn the lugs based on the pitch detected. The user just need to select the pitch they want and simply place the device on the drum and the device will automatically tune it to the desired pitch.
 

wang974

Member
Similar in that it tightens all lugs at the same time. But with servo controlled motors doing each one the control unit can make judgements as to individual tension. Mechanically that would be difficult and require individual torque wrenches.

But as I posted in the other thread, even tension does not equal even tuning as those with drum dials can attest to. To be really good you need to be able to tune each lug to pitch to “clear” each lug so somewhere in this new contraption it need the ability to listen to the pitch of each lug individually. Tunebot tries to do this but Resotune is much much more accurate in this regard.
Hi There,

Thanks so much for the comment. The device is tuning the fundamental pitch of the drum by tuning each individual lug pitch. There's triggers at each corner and sense each lug frequency and turn each lug.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
So you are measuring pitch at each lug and then converting the harmonic to the fundamental?

How are you exciting the pitch of the head (and the pitch at each lug)? Feel free to PM me if this gets to be too much info for the thread.
 

wang974

Member
So you are measuring pitch at each lug and then converting the harmonic to the fundamental?

How are you exciting the pitch of the head (and the pitch at each lug)? Feel free to PM me if this gets to be too much info for the thread.
Exactly! It's essentially the same tuning concept as the TuneBot.
So if you look closely in the horribly made videos 😄, there are solenoids placed at each lugs to hit the head close to the lug to trigger the lug sound and then the microphone picks up the sound and calculates the pitch of the lug sound (Harmonics).
 

BenOBrienSmith

Senior Member
What's the realtime duration of this process? Tough to get to the end of that video only to hear that the drum didn't even sound so great (the operation was a success but the patient is dead...). If you can design it into a more practical form factor, Cody and I might be interested in testing it out with Sounds Like a Drum. Perhaps a race of man vs. machine?
 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
From an engineering perspective I think it's pretty cool. From a marketing and price point perspective I have my doubts. Drum Dial and Tune Bot both do a pretty good job so you would competing with them. Given the complexity of your device your challenge would to produce a unit that is price competitive with the devices that already have a share of the market. That said, good luck with the device!!
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
While the science and the mechanics are way cool, the only potential sales I imagine are manufacturers so they can tune their drums for final testing before they are sent out.

I'm wondering if there was a marketing intention or if it was built for another reason that I can't think of.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I think most of these tings are more trouble than they're worth. At least for the average Joe.

I have a Tune_Bot and a Resotune. I got them both quite recently . Even those I got more for fun and experimentation than something I'd actually bring to a gig. They're tools that may serve a purpose, but I definetly feel we should be able to do without them when it really comes down to it.

A machine isn't gonna decide for me if something sounds good or not.

Comparison can be made with other instruments I guess ,and yes, as guitar player being able to tune silently on stage is great. Give me a typical, especially no trem guitar off stage though, and I can assure you it's only used to tune the high E to the right pitch. The rest of the guitar is done by ear. It's quicker and the traditional(non-BFTS) guitar being the not so perfectly in tune instrument it is, it's also more accurateand pleasant sounding.
 
Top