Auditioning for a New Orleans jazz/funk/etc. band

Brian

Gold Member
I'm wondering, from the bass player and band's POV, what they will be looking for and expecting to hear.

I was thinking of asking for the standards we are doing and figuring it out from there. But I don't want to embarrass myself since it's been five years since playing with anyone.

I know it's very loose, funky and swinging at times from listening to records. Stay away from too many fills and playing on top of the beat. There's also the over-the-barline feels and displacement, esp. the funk.

Any advice on top of those basics? For whatever reason, this situation sounds extremely intriguing to me. Like I've been practicing all of these years to do something like this. It takes a very tasteful drummer to do it, I'm worried. :D
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Re: Auditioning for a New Orleans jazz band

Try to lock in with the bass player and drive the swinging feel.
You'll most likely be playing with acoustic instruments so make sure that you can hear everyone as well as you can yourself- in other words watch your dynamic level within the band. Be certain that if you play time on the bass drum that you are just feathering it with a quarter note pulse, more of a feel than an actual kick sound. Watch Uncle Ed in this video... http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/edshaughnessywhoseblues.html

Support the different solo's at all times and maybe when the bass player takes a solo, play time on just the closed hi-hat. The snare wires in Dixieland music are slightly loose compared to other styles. Maybe get a small cowbell and woodblock to mount on your bass drum.

Keep your solo's in the style and form of the tune if you're playing "traditional" jazz i.e. the first quarter of the twentieth century. In this regard, you are sending the signal to the band when to come back in to the top.

Best of luck and keep it swingin' !
 

Brian

Gold Member
Re: Auditioning for a New Orleans jazz band

Try to lock in with the bass player and drive the swinging feel.
You'll most likely be playing with acoustic instruments so make sure that you can hear everyone as well as you can yourself- in other words watch your dynamic level within the band. Be certain that if you play time on the bass drum that you are just feathering it with a quarter note pulse, more of a feel than an actual kick sound. Watch Uncle Ed in this video... http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/edshaughnessywhoseblues.html

Support the different solo's at all times and maybe when the bass player takes a solo, play time on just the closed hi-hat. The snare wires in Dixieland music are slightly loose compared to other styles. Maybe get a small cowbell and woodblock to mount on your bass drum.

Keep your solo's in the style and form of the tune if you're playing "traditional" jazz i.e. the first quarter of the twentieth century. In this regard, you are sending the signal to the band when to come back in to the top.

Best of luck and keep it swingin' !
Thank you. I'm checking out the video. Good points, and I'll definitely bring a block and cowbell.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
You have to practice a second line jazz beat,which is common in lots of New Orleans jazz music.Lots of rim clicks,wood blocks and some.....cow bell and splash cymbals.Just search youtube for Preservation Hall jazz band......

Steve B
 

Brian

Gold Member
You have to practice a second line jazz beat,which is common in lots of New Orleans jazz music.Lots of rim clicks,wood blocks and some.....cow bell and splash cymbals.Just search youtube for Preservation Hall jazz band......

Steve B
Yeah, but I'm also looking for the bassist or other musicians POV...what are they looking for....a cool solo? just simple playing, no frills? make it look like I know what I'm doing? LOL
 

brady

Platinum Member
Yeah, but I'm also looking for the bassist or other musicians POV...what are they looking for....a cool solo? just simple playing, no frills? make it look like I know what I'm doing? LOL
First and foremost, other musos want a good groove from us. A solo is just icing on the cake.

Check out masters like Earl Palmer, Herlin Riley, Johnny Vidacovich, Stanton Moore, and others to get an idea what the other guys will expect.
 

Brian

Gold Member
At the rehearsals, they're usually set with a metronome through the PA. This is something I wish I knew beforehand ;)....I'm very "lean" when it comes to playing through metronomes with others. Especially jazz.
 

vxla

Silver Member
Probably looking for a solid source of time. Leave your ego at the door, along with solos.
 
Top