At what age did you start drumming?

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member

GarrettTheDrummer

Junior Member
I guess I technically started on a snare when I was 10, but my real start was when I moved to a full kit just before I turned 12.

What's funny is I really had no real interest in playing the instrument when I started. I just had a friend who's sister played the flute in our elementary schools band before classes started a couple days a week, and since my friend had to get dragged along he asked me if I wanted to join him and play the snare drum. At the time it just seemed like a good excuse to hang out with my friend before classes started.

I can't imagine what my life would look like now if that had never happened though. I don't think I would have met my wife through my bandmates friends, moved halfway across the country to Nashville, or ended up with a job in the music industry. It's weird how such seemingly small moments can snowball like that. Life's crazy. :)
 

SharkSandwich

Junior Member
I started at 17 and I got my first kit the same year. I played in my first band three years later and from that time on I have never NOT been in a band. I'm super fortunate to have played with a lot of wonderful people.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
I started playing the drums on an every day basis around 9 years old. But here is something to think about. I was in my mom's tummy while my Mom and Dad were on the bus traveling the country with the Ted Fio Rito Band. My Mom was a singer and my Dad was the drummer. So before I was born, I was picking up the musical vibe from a bus full of musicians and the rhythmic movements of the bus........ LOL

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@Hollywood Jim this sounds very similar to me. My mom sang, and my dad guitar. I can vividly remember as early as 3 years old falling asleep (or trying to) while the band rehearsed downstairs rock and pop tunes from the era. Got my first child’s kit when I was 7 and real kit (Tama) at 11. By then I had a stepdad (awesome drummer) who taught me the basics and more. Definitely helped having a musical family.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
I still have my dads pad like that from the 50's...so much history to that simple thing.
I never owned one but have seen & used one like this. Why the severe slant? Was this supposed to replicate the slant of a mounted tom?
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I never owned one but have seen & used one like this. Why the severe slant? Was this supposed to replicate the slant of a mounted tom?

slant of a marching snare...for traditional grip
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
slant of a marching snare...for traditional grip
Ahhh. That makes sense why I used one back in HS. We had canvas straps underneath our uniforms which we hooked to the marching snare, they tilted some but probably not quite as much as the pad. Nothing as fancy as the tri toms which had built in harnesses.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
So many have voiced others in family "musical" could that hint at "genetic"????

I've traced my family genealogy, initially with written record, but now genetic to my Last Universal Common Ancestor who likely played drums and turns out he was a first generation Modern man/Neanderthal hybrid. That's a big drum stick in his hand. Apparently evidence indicates both modern humans and Neanderthals could sing and dance so I could get it from both sides of family tree. Apparently the anatomical abilities arose 1.5 million years ago and the "common ancestral code" common to music and language arose 1 million years ago. So likely Homo Erectus that also harnessed fire, made boats, were also in stages of language and music evolution since it appears erectus, denisovans, neanderthals (and/or heidelbergenses), floresienses, and sapiens were in stages of language and music evolution. Weird since music is thought to have no "evolutionary advantage" yet likely so common in hominid lineage-make me think the "thinking" has been wrong LOL. Seems music is "essential" to humans doesn't it. And yet..................................................................................................................................................
Haha that’s fabulous and the likeness is striking. :)
To answer your last question: IMO Yes it does. Which is why more recently than your ancestry the “experts” have encouraged mothers-to-be to play music (especially classical since presumably it is more beneficial to the unborn baby) before, during and after birth. Supposed to make em more intelligent and perhaps ingrain some musical propensity at the earliest possible time. My folks played rock and roll so the classical wasn’t really part of my life until I ‘discovered’ it my late teens. Tchaikovsky has been tagged with the foundation for rock, and Mozart, Corelli, Schubert et al are awesome. This from a huge AC⚡DC fan. I also like The Bee Gees and Johnny Cash so go figure.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Ahhh. That makes sense why I used one back in HS. We had canvas straps underneath our uniforms which we hooked to the marching snare, they tilted some but probably not quite as much as the pad. Nothing as fancy as the tri toms which had built in harnesses.

yep...

my tri toms did not have a built in harness, they were this torture contraption of a metal belly plate, and a bunch of straps until my senior year, when we got "homemade" harnesses...which were not much better
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I have my first ever lesson tomorrow, so I guess technically, I start drumming tomorrow.

or...you refine drumming starting tomorrow. :cool:
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
I started when I was 40. Is that unusual?
Based on what I've seen on DW everything is unusual ;). Seriously, it does seem like people are all over the board with respect to their starting point. Having said that, like everything in life it seems 'easier' to learn when younger (hence the phrase 'you can't teach an old dog new tricks'). But just because it might be easier to learn as a younger person, that is irrelevant to anyone who has the desire and drive to be as good as they want to be.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
The usual story: Apparently I was always banging on pots and pans as a toddler so was told to get drum lessons which didn't officially start until age 10 (seems to be the average age judging by the posts so far). First kit was at 13 years old however.

View attachment 98268
Nice! It does appear however that the ? might be tough to reach...?
 
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