At what age did you start drumming?

Started two years ago at age 50. Since then I’ve played in several churches, I’m in two bands, played at least 10 different venues and my wife got to see me play live. I’ve exceeded my highest expectations and hopefully still have a long way to go. And for that, especially today, I’m thankful.
My grandfather was still playing clubs 5 nights a week until he was 90...
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
So many have voiced others in family "musical" could that hint at "genetic"????

I've traced my family genealogy, initially with written record, but now genetic to my Last Universal Common Ancestor who likely played drums and turns out he was a first generation Modern man/Neanderthal hybrid. That's a big drum stick in his hand. Apparently evidence indicates both modern humans and Neanderthals could sing and dance so I could get it from both sides of family tree. Apparently the anatomical abilities arose 1.5 million years ago and the "common ancestral code" common to music and language arose 1 million years ago. So likely Homo Erectus that also harnessed fire, made boats, were also in stages of language and music evolution since it appears erectus, denisovans, neanderthals (and/or heidelbergenses), floresienses, and sapiens were in stages of language and music evolution. Weird since music is thought to have no "evolutionary advantage" yet likely so common in hominid lineage-make me think the "thinking" has been wrong LOL. Seems music is "essential" to humans doesn't it. And yet..................................................................................................................................................
 

Attachments

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
So many have voiced others in family "musical" could that hint at "genetic"????

I've traced my family genealogy, initially with written record, but now genetic to my Last Universal Common Ancestor who likely played drums and turns out he was a first generation Modern man/Neanderthal hybrid. That's a big drum stick in his hand. Apparently evidence indicates both modern humans and Neanderthals could sing and dance so I could get it from both sides of family tree. Apparently the anatomical abilities arose 1.5 million years ago and the "common ancestral code" common to music and language arose 1 million years ago. So likely Homo Erectus that also harnessed fire, made boats, were also in stages of language and music evolution since it appears erectus, denisovans, neanderthals (and/or heidelbergenses), floresienses, and sapiens were in stages of language and music evolution. Weird since music is thought to have no "evolutionary advantage" yet likely so common in hominid lineage-make me think the "thinking" has been wrong LOL. Seems music is "essential" to humans doesn't it. And yet..................................................................................................................................................
I typically only make it one or two sentences into your posts - but they are still typically my favorites. This is no exception haha.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
So many have voiced others in family "musical" could that hint at "genetic"????

I've traced my family genealogy, initially with written record, but now genetic to my Last Universal Common Ancestor who likely played drums and turns out he was a first generation Modern man/Neanderthal hybrid. That's a big drum stick in his hand. Apparently evidence indicates both modern humans and Neanderthals could sing and dance so I could get it from both sides of family tree. Apparently the anatomical abilities arose 1.5 million years ago and the "common ancestral code" common to music and language arose 1 million years ago. So likely Homo Erectus that also harnessed fire, made boats, were also in stages of language and music evolution since it appears erectus, denisovans, neanderthals (and/or heidelbergenses), floresienses, and sapiens were in stages of language and music evolution. Weird since music is thought to have no "evolutionary advantage" yet likely so common in hominid lineage-make me think the "thinking" has been wrong LOL. Seems music is "essential" to humans doesn't it. And yet..................................................................................................................................................
I can’t help but think that music is intrinsically linked to how the species emotionally expresses those things that are often beyond the grasp of mere words alone; happiness, sadness, grief, love, and hate. Not to mention how music is interwoven into the very fabric of our mating, religious and fighting rituals...David Coverdale’s Whitesnake covered all of this off in great detail on their 1984 album “Slide It In”...on a lighter note, my great grandfather was a drummer in the Scots Guards you know... :unsure:
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
can’t help but think that music is intrinsically linked to how the species emotionally expresses those things that are often beyond the grasp of mere words alone; happiness, sadness, grief, love, and hate.
I'm 100% in agreement with this. I have a much more emotional connection with music than anything else, with immediate family being the only exception. Even then, sometimes human connection is still lost on me until a piece of music opens an emotional pathway and a connection is finally made. Example: if I meet someone for the first time and there is music playing, the emotional response I get from the music can be directly reflected upon said person. Also, the interactions I have with people can trigger unexpected or unwarranted emotions that can be corrected with the correct music.

Music can fix me much easier than anything else if I allow myself to become one with it. I plug myself in and have musical relaxation time almost daily just to keep myself centered.
 

tfgretsch

Junior Member
So many have voiced others in family "musical" could that hint at "genetic"????

I've traced my family genealogy, initially with written record, but now genetic to my Last Universal Common Ancestor who likely played drums and turns out he was a first generation Modern man/Neanderthal hybrid. That's a big drum stick in his hand. Apparently evidence indicates both modern humans and Neanderthals could sing and dance so I could get it from both sides of family tree. Apparently the anatomical abilities arose 1.5 million years ago and the "common ancestral code" common to music and language arose 1 million years ago. So likely Homo Erectus that also harnessed fire, made boats, were also in stages of language and music evolution since it appears erectus, denisovans, neanderthals (and/or heidelbergenses), floresienses, and sapiens were in stages of language and music evolution. Weird since music is thought to have no "evolutionary advantage" yet likely so common in hominid lineage-make me think the "thinking" has been wrong LOL. Seems music is "essential" to humans doesn't it. And yet..................................................................................................................................................
Did they use T REX bones for sticks ??
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I can’t help but think that music is intrinsically linked to how the species emotionally expresses those things that are often beyond the grasp of mere words alone; happiness, sadness, grief, love, and hate. Not to mention how music is interwoven into the very fabric of our mating, religious and fighting rituals...David Coverdale’s Whitesnake covered all of this off in great detail on their 1984 album “Slide It In”...on a lighter note, my great grandfather was a drummer in the Scots Guards you know... :unsure:
I'm 100% in agreement with this. I have a much more emotional connection with music than anything else, with immediate family being the only exception. Even then, sometimes human connection is still lost on me until a piece of music opens an emotional pathway and a connection is finally made. Example: if I meet someone for the first time and there is music playing, the emotional response I get from the music can be directly reflected upon said person. Also, the interactions I have with people can trigger unexpected or unwarranted emotions that can be corrected with the correct music.

Music can fix me much easier than anything else if I allow myself to become one with it. I plug myself in and have musical relaxation time almost daily just to keep myself centered.
I agree the emotion can be rage for war or feelings of love or loss. Music does transcend in how we respond to music- cry or dance. It’s an emergent property on those who make music as those who it entertains. I think it’s some nature and definitely nurture-everyone has to nurture the craft to improve or make their statement. I bet all of us can attest to periods in life where certain songs are like markers of life events. You here the song snd can instantly go back and relive that emotion and time. I think that’s why entertaining people has such value to those who make it as those who enjoy. Like I know my physician wife takes great joy in helping people - her reward is doing it. We are aural physicians coming to the emotional rescue- in my best sassy Mick voice. Oooooo
 

petrez

Senior Member
Started out in the drumline at my schools marching band at 8 years old, in 1992. Soon advanced to the drumkit. Until I found out it's much cooler to play punk and metal in a "real" band, a few years later 😅
 

someguy01

Well-known member
Sometime in my 20s when I lived on my own and could afford a kit, then I found out about drums in an apt and didn't have any again until my birthday last year.
I always wanted to play, but that wasn't gonna when I have an older sister who got to try everything, lose interest, waste money, and subsequently teach my parents not to extend me the same opportunities so more money wasn't wasted.
I envy those of you who come from musical families and had your interest nurtured early on.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
17. I was very shy in school but drumming helped me be one of the cool guys. Musicians back then we're just cooler than the average cool guy.
 
Top