Article - Tommy Lee returns to DW Drums

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DB7

Member
Not fair........I'd only change lives with him if I could go back to 83' and bang Heather Locklear in her prime.i bet Pink did some stuff that would make you 2" shorter as well............Pam Anderson never impressed me.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Not fair........I'd only change lives with him if I could go back to 83' and bang Heather Locklear in her prime.i bet Pink did some stuff that would make you 2" shorter as well............Pam Anderson never impressed me.
I really question his taste in not hanging on to Pink. Heather Locklear does not impress me. Pink is a legit artist. She’s awesome and I would marry her and have 6 kids tomorrow if I weren’t already married. Oh well.
 
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Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Not fair........I'd only change lives with him if I could go back to 83' and bang Heather Locklear in her prime.i bet Pink did some stuff that would make you 2" shorter as well............Pam Anderson never impressed me.
Really? That’s all it would take? Wow.
 

specgrade

Senior Member
I saw, on TV, Tommy drumming with Sammy. They played Rock Candy. First I'd heard of the song. Solid playing.
As for Shout At The Devil, Tommy played the music. All of the lyrical content and title came from Nikki...blame him.
As far as him beating up on women, he went to jail and paid his dues. Two sides to every story. He's lucky he didn't get himself Bobbitted.
And I always looked at Pink and thought she was gay. My Bad!
I've done my fair share of drugs and booze. Just a part of my life. Tommy didn't influence me in that way. All drumming.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
Yeah, and "If my uncle had breasts he'd be my aunt". Forgive me but you seem awfully bitter. Be it known that I can't name of one Motley Crue's songs. My take here is you can't argue with success.



Word. :cool:
Success at what? Motley Crue’s hit songs are all vaguely embarrassing. “Shout at the Devil”? The heck is that? LOL

I mean, I hate the idea that my embarrassing young adulthood follies would have been broadcast to the world like Tommy’s were. But that’s often the price of fame in your 20s.

And if the lifestyle was/is so great, why did they need drugs so much? Drugs are not something a content, balanced person uses heavily and regularly.

Why are you in this thread other than talking crap about a drummer that a lot of hair band guys like? Have you listened to Shout at the Devil, the drum part? It's great, it grooves, it rocks, it has character. Jeez man. Take that stick out yer butt.

And if we concentrated on every star's personal life, we'd be SO depressed or pissed off, we wouldn't like anyone. Get over yourself.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Why are you in this thread other than talking crap about a drummer that a lot of hair band guys like? Have you listened to Shout at the Devil, the drum part? It's great, it grooves, it rocks, it has character. Jeez man. Take that stick out yer butt.

And if we concentrated on every star's personal life, we'd be SO depressed or pissed off, we wouldn't like anyone. Get over yourself.
Did Tommy actually play on that recording? And I can’t take those guys seriously. I’ve got nothing against them, but let’s be honest—they were probably not taking themselves entirely seriously either. It’s a little too over-the-top to be totally believable. Not that I have anything against them.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Wow such hostility. I was w big hair band fan back in the 80s. It’s what got me started. There way way better drummers playing in hair bands back then than got recognition. Few have been named. Many more remain.

My hats off to Mr. Lee for his success. For the most part, his broken and obnoxious lifestyle isn’t far off of most any documentary I watch. Fame screwed with your head more often than not. Never have I hated my favorite bands more than after watching their documentaries.

I’m more surprised at the bands that didn’t derail than I am with the ones who did. Genre doesn’t seem to make much difference, but hair bands were a bit more rowdy!
 

Super Phil

Senior Member
Tommy seems to be a bit of a tool in his personal life, but the guy threw down the perfect drum parts for that band. (and certainly lived life to the fullest along the way)
And to this day, Motley Crue live on their Dr. Feelgood tour is one of the best/most entertaining shows I've ever seen in person.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
In my opinion, Tommy Lee's fans like him for his Rock Star persona...more than for his drumming. And they don't even realize it. It's the lifestyle, the fame, the babes, and being able to play 360° upside down drum solos in front of thousands of screaming fans.

Subconsciously they want to BE him. That's what appeals to most of his fans and they don't even realize it.

Nobody idolizes his playing, especially these days. "Hey, check out this cool Tommy Lee lick!" - said no one ever
 

wraub

Well-known member
I worked at a nice NYC recording studio for a couple years, and saw things and met people I never would have imagined beforehand.

One of these was a young guitarist/songwriter not to be named here, who's producer had locked out the whole studio for a month. They brought in literal truckloads of vintage guitars and amps, some of the best players in town... and a ProTools engineer with a separate rig to comp all the takes into usable tracks.
This was for a fairly low-level artist, so the idea of a major act doing it is completely believable imo.





[snip] I even met a second engineer at Ocean Way studios in L.A. who worked with Metallica and he told me there are vaults of tape that the band recorded where Lars just couldn't get through a whole song. Much of their material is edited cuts spliced together. So I'm hip to what they do to make hit records, maybe this has jaded me about alot of artists. [snip]
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I worked at a nice NYC recording studio for a couple years, and saw things and met people I never would have imagined beforehand.

One of these was a young guitarist/songwriter not to be named here, who's producer had locked out the whole studio for a month. They brought in literal truckloads of vintage guitars and amps, some of the best players in town... and a ProTools engineer with a separate rig to comp all the takes into usable tracks.
This was for a fairly low-level artist, so the idea of a major act doing it is completely believable imo.
And with the truth coming out that favorite live albums weren’t actually live, has kinda jaded me even more. I even read somewhere that Thin Lizzys’ “Alice and Dangerous” wasn’t very alive or dangerous. My world has gone askew!
 

fb305

Junior Member
I'm no fan of Motley Crue or Tommy Lee but I think he does a good job in that band and he probably worked his ass off to get where he's at. I've never understood the bashing of him and guys like Lars Ulrich, Phil Rudd, Ringo, Charlie Watts, etc. All of those guys might not be technically the greatest drummers ever but they all do a great job in the bands that they're in and have all influenced tons of other drummers and have done things that most of us can only dream of doing. They've all had long and successful careers, not to mention that all of them are on multi platinum records that will live on long after they're dead. Even if you don't like their music, I don't see how anyone can criticize any of these guys, no matter how good of a drummer you are or think that you are.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
I'm no fan of Motley Crue or Tommy Lee but I think he does a good job in that band and he probably worked his ass off to get where he's at. I've never understood the bashing of him and guys like Lars Ulrich, Phil Rudd, Ringo, Charlie Watts, etc. All of those guys might not be technically the greatest drummers ever but they all do a great job in the bands that they're in . . . . (snipped)
All of those drummers you mentioned, some more than others (especially Lars IMO) their playing style was crucial to the whole sound of the band. So it's not always how "good" someone is. What matters is how much would they be missed? What happens to the music without him or her?

And in some cases, frankly all you do need is someone with chops. Take for example all those neoclassical guitar shredders that emerged in the 80s. They all had world class drummers laying down tracks on their records (Steve Smith, Atma Anur, Deen Castronovo), and really, any one of them could have played on any album and sounded great.
 

fb305

Junior Member
All of those drummers you mentioned, some more than others (especially Lars IMO) their playing style was crucial to the whole sound of the band. So it's not always how "good" someone is. What matters is how much would they be missed? What happens to the music without him or her?

And in some cases, frankly all you do need is someone with chops. Take for example all those neoclassical guitar shredders that emerged in the 80s. They all had world class drummers laying down tracks on their records (Steve Smith, Atma Anur, Deen Castronovo), and really, any one of them could have played on any album and sounded great.
I see your point but that is kind of my point as well. I think that everyone that I mentioned are so well known that they would and should be missed. They could all technically be replaced, there's always someone out there that could play as well as or even better, but that could be said about pretty much any drummer in any band with very few exceptions. All of those that I mentioned have reached a level of success that I think deserves respect whether they have the greatest chops or not. We should celebrate any drummer that is as well known in their band as the singer or guitar player. When Black Sabbath replaced Bill Ward for their last album and tour, I as a fan didn't support that move and didn't go see them on that tour because to me he is as important in that band as Ozzy is. I'm sure that the guy that they had replace him did a good job but to me it wasn't the same and Bill deserved to be there as much as anyone else in that band. Sorry, I'm rambling at this point. I normally wouldn't even reply to a thread like this, I would read it and move on but Coronavirus and lack of being around people have made me extremely bored!
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
I grew up in the 70s-80s on hard rock and metal. I had a couple Motley Crue tapes. My friend and I both bought the Dr. Feelgood album, mine on cassette, his on CD. We played each song back-to-back, tape version then CD version. I couldn't believe how much better the CD album version sounded. I had heard other CD vs tape albums but this is the album that made me decide to buy CDs instead of tapes moving forward.

I didn't take up drumming until my late teens, never did band in school. The song, "Kickstart My Heart," w/ 8ths being played on the snare during the verses led me to learning "the train beat" -which lead to learning country music songs, which lead me to being in a country band briefly. So in a way Tommy Lee influenced me to learn about another way of playing.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Lars was a good drummer. He stopped practicing, chose the white powder and to top it off he was fronting the issues with downloading, which he was right about, quite a while before it was popular to talk about, when it was mainly Napster and people didn't get it yet.

If you do your job well, make the bansd sound good etc.. you are a good drummer. You don't have to be a drum athlete to be a good musician. Many of those "athletes" are not. It's still about the music.

Of course, when it comes to metal, many of us, especially those who continue to study lose interest in that genre over time. Several reasons for that, but to me it was a teenage thing, and my tastes and interests have changed. It was never a big thing for anyways. I have a special place in my heart for Annihilator's "Never Neverland" and that's about it. The dry production and perfect execution has a charm to me, same as I find in TOP's "Rhythm 'n' Business."

I was never into much metal at all, but there's music that has a place in my heart because it was the soundtrack to a certain time in my life. That's the only reason and that's reason enough.
 
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