Are you home trained, are learned in school?

BillBachman

Gold Member
I'm a bit of each, unless schooled negates the "home taught" option. Lessons tend to make you better much faster.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I did the majority of my "learning" on my own in a rather un-structured way, essentially hard knocks and playing shows with my band. Only in about the last 3 years or so have I taken weekly lessons.

I honestly see value in both approaches, and I'm glad I developed myself in my own style before going to see how others learned it and go about it.

Of course, the downside is that when I started, and even to this day, I have some bad habits at the kit technique wise that are hard to break to the point where I was unable to play things I already could if I tried to play it with correct technique. Learning to write and read drum music is also a new thing for me since I started taking lessons, and my ability at reading is far behind my ability to play.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
Self-taught until my 40s. Took lessons for a couple of years, and wished I could go back in time and start lessons from the beginning and never stop.

There is just no comparison.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Self-taught for a few years. Went to college and had to unlearn what I learned. Learned how to continue to teach myself in an efficient and productive manner. Started playing for a living and learned how to really dig in and learn on the fly.

...on a side note, when you say "home trained" or "home taught", that implies 2 people are present during the learning process. Were you taught or trained by a parent?
 
A

audiotech

Guest
Home trained by my dad who was home trained by his grandfather. I still take lessons now and again to brush up on genres I normally do not use. There is always something to learn.

Dennis
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Mainly "home trained" here, I took some lessons at the conservatory of music years ago, mainly to learn to read and I had a few one to one lessons too, but I'm basically a self-taught drummer... and it shows :)
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
I took lessons at the start and never stopped taking them for the next 10+ years. Some of these were in private settings while others where in Community Music Schools.

From then on, you could say I'm mostly self-taught. Though, about 7 years ago I did go back for 2 semesters at Eastman Community Music School for some additional private lessons. I'd love to go back for some more private studies sometime in the future. I love to learn.
 
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mikel

Platinum Member
Self-taught here. Never had a lesson. Not interested really. I play what I want/like to play. If I see or hear something I like, I work at it until I can play it, or something comes out of the practice process that interests me even more and leads somewhere else.

I am not saying my playing in unique by using this process, far from it, It is just that I have always hated formal learning and prefer to take my own path.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
Had a few lessons when I was young and then tried again in middle age but discipline is not my forte. I'd be a better player today if I'd taken lessons, but them's the breaks.

My teachers were the players I watched play live and on TV, the records I bought, drum magazines, interviews, and three books - The Rudiments of Music, The Complete Book of Modern Drumming and Max on Swing.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Band and orchestra nerd in school for 5 years and then on my own. I suggest professional lessons.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I'm mostly home taught with some selective lessons. That's not entirely by choice and I want to study regularly with a teacher at some point.

Already being trained musician I already know how to get the most out of my practice time and I own a copy of just about every well known drum book and dvd out there.

What I want a teacher for is to get some real help with jazz and latin playing, because there my holes are also much more than technical. I need help from someone who can provide me with the tools to create a full foundation, not just for me, but also for my students.

Still looking for the right teachers.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Had a few lessons when I was young and then tried again in middle age but discipline is not my forte. I'd be a better player today if I'd taken lessons, but them's the breaks.

My teachers were the players I watched play live and on TV, the records I bought, drum magazines, interviews, and three books - The Rudiments of Music, The Complete Book of Modern Drumming and Max on Swing.
Hi Anon. You may not have been a better player with lessons, but you would have been a different player than you are now. Weather you want to be a different player is a moot point.
 

MJD

Silver Member
I had many years of lessons for most of my instruments except guitar. I chose to study classical composition in college. I was not the best student in terms of practicing the material i was supposed to but i always did my best to have "perfect" technique. My reasoning was that if i acquired the technique i would be able to apply it to whatever was needed and more importantly to my own musical ideas. So far this has served me very well as I havent felt out of my depth with anything for several years now. playing wise that is. I still get confused about set theory and the like. I am extremely grateful to all my teachers for putting up with my somewhat stubborn approach and for showing me what i needed to know in order to learn. I once said to my friend "i just graduated from music school, that means that now i know what i need to know to start studying music." The rest of my life is for that study and i intend to learn all i can and improve as much as i can in all the areas of music that i can.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
Hi Anon. You may not have been a better player with lessons, but you would have been a different player than you are now. Weather you want to be a different player is a moot point.
I would have more facility, Mik - and facility is the brick wall that I run into all the time. On the plus side, it keeps me tasteful by not getting too carried away but I don't have anywhere near the variety and scope that I'd like (as MJ said, "to apply it to whatever was needed and more importantly to my own musical ideas"). Unfortunately, I'm too ADD to undergo the level of training needed to undo my hardwired inefficient grip and stroke, so que sera sera.

I'll go with you to the extent that the workarounds of largely self taught players have often resulted in innovation and strongly personalised sounds over the years - Ringo, Bonzo, Ginger, Moonie, Paice etc. Sadly, the workarouds of Polly only resulted in a suburban level of innovation :)

In today's pop and rock there is more emphasis of "professionalism" (a concept I've never cared for) and "perfection" (ie. lined up on a grid). That works against self taught drummers so I'd find it hard to recommend self teaching to a young player at this time. (Now that I've said that there'll be a grunge revival in two years).
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
In today's pop and rock there is more emphasis of "professionalism" (a concept I've never cared for) and "perfection" (ie. lined up on a grid). (Now that I've said that there'll be a grunge revival in two years).

There always is. Stuff gets too clean and someone will step in and mix it up. Seems to be about every decade or two.

Mid/ late 60's, late 70's/early 80's, Late 80's/early 90's.....we are over due.
 
Self-taught for a few years. Went to college and had to unlearn what I learned. Learned how to continue to teach myself in an efficient and productive manner. Started playing for a living and learned how to really dig in and learn on the fly.

...on a side note, when you say "home trained" or "home taught", that implies 2 people are present during the learning process. Were you taught or trained by a parent?
My dad taught me my first beat, but I used my iPod and YouTube for the rest:) I had a drum-off with my friend who had lessons for two years, and even he admitted I'm better than him.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
There always is. Stuff gets too clean and someone will step in and mix it up. Seems to be about every decade or two.

Mid/ late 60's, late 70's/early 80's, Late 80's/early 90's.....we are over due.
Nicely put, NewT. If the next garage revival has anything to do with the old psychedelic rock I'd be tempted to throw in my lounge band, buy a new kit and jump into playing regularly!

I'm ready to pounce the moment drummers are allowed to be a bit loose again :)
 
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