Are we living in a "Buyer's market?"

Chunkaway

Silver Member
Are we talking about vintage drums? Because if we are, it is definitely NOT a buyer's market. I'm seeing vntage Ludwigs and vintage Camcos going for more than I can remember.

Now if we are talking about modern drums, then yes, it is a buyer's market. Lots of quality kits on the market these days.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
It's a tough question because the answers to it are all over the place. I think a lot of it is a common disease found on eBay (for instance) called: ItsworthmoreifIownitthanifyoudoitus. Not fatal, but your gear will languish unsold. From a seller's perspective, I tend to price things fairly and I still get buyers trying to lowball the crud out of me. It just comes down to a bottom line price that I would rather keep it than sell it, below a certain amount.

From a buyer's perspective, there are just lots of times when I decide I can live without something for now, or maybe ever.

Pete
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Have any of you been tempted to message people on FB or Craigslist to say their drums will never sell in a million years at that price? I sure have, haha.

It's usually a Pearl Export bundled with cheap cymbals and a cheap double pedal for $1200.

One guy in particular had this massive Tama kit that must've been 15 years old, with what looked like 20 years worth of accumulated gear, dozens of cymbals and accessories...for a ludicrous amount like $5000 or $7000. And he insisted on selling all of it TOGETHER. lol
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Have any of you been tempted to message people on FB or Craigslist to say their drums will never sell in a million years at that price? I sure have, haha.
I did something like this with a car I wanted. It had a small issue, I knew what was and how to fix the issue. My wife still wouldn't agree to me buying it. I sent him a message telling him what was wrong and how to fix it. The ad was removed shortly thereafter.

I would LOVE to tell these people their stuff won't sell. But they won't listen. I think the rule goes: my stuff is gold, their stuff is crap, buy my stuff
 

danondrums

Well-known member
It's an annoying market. That's about all I know. Buyers are annoying, sellers are annoying. Just annoying for the most part.
People should list items for the minimum they're willing to take and move on. People's desire to haggle and waste time over $10-20 in one direction or another are the worst people on the planet.
 

Captain Bash

Silver Member
It’s a buyers market if you are after a lower to mid level kit and or a cymbal lines that are out of vogue.

A quick inspection of eBay in the UK suggests that it’s quite possible to get a pretty decent sounding set up for less. Conversely I see “vintage“ gear like old Premiers or Haymans way over priced relative to their playability / actual sound. To a certain extent this effect is exaggerated with cymbals. For example Zildjian A customs don't fit with the dry/trash cymbal fashion trends and can be had on eBay for less than one might expect.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Are we talking about vintage drums? Because if we are, it is definitely NOT a buyer's market. I'm seeing vntage Ludwigs and vintage Camcos going for more than I can remember.
Are you talking about their asking prices? Because I watch the market all the time, and most sellers still think that the market is the same as ten, even five years ago. It's not. Not even on vintage gear. Sellers are still asking premium prices - and sitting on that gear for a long, long time. We're back to the time when an average Ludwig five-piece kit is selling for $500-600.

The only drums still bringing high prices are the rare sets that people like Steve Maxwell sells. There will always be well-heeled collectors willing to pay top dollars for the truly hard-to-find gear.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
Only stuff I'm buying from here on out is stuff I want to keep 'til I'm toes up. Many states are forcing collection of state sales tax by online retailers. Of course that's tacked on to the price you're paying. I had one last kit I needed to get rid of and it was REALLY hard to sell at what was a fair price. I actually got into argument with a guy from Craigslist. I finally told him I wouldn't sell it to him no matter what and to stop contacting me. I'm down to one kit and a couple nice snares. I could see maybe getting one more quality kit at some point but that would be it.
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
Are you talking about their asking prices? Because I watch the market all the time, and most sellers still think that the market is the same as ten, even five years ago. It's not. Not even on vintage gear. Sellers are still asking premium prices - and sitting on that gear for a long, long time. We're back to the time when an average Ludwig five-piece kit is selling for $500-600.

The only drums still bringing high prices are the rare sets that people like Steve Maxwell sells. There will always be well-heeled collectors willing to pay top dollars for the truly hard-to-find gear.

GeeDeeEmm
Check out Wood and Weather's gear, their prices, and how much they are getting. There was a 4 piece 1967 Ludwig champagne sparkle set (20/14/12) in good - not great - condition that recently sold for $2k. There have been several I have seen in the price range. Maybe that isn't the case with everyone, but a couple of years ago that kit would have sold for $1500.
 
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DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Yes. On many levels.

Largely due, over the last 10 or so years, manufactures making more and more kits with high-end features at mid-range prices.

Drums like Gretsch Calatina and Renown lines, Mapex Armory, 101 variations of Pearl and Tama, Yamaha Tour, PDP, etc, etc flooded the market with nice drums that don't cost an arm and leg.

And then there are the 101 smaller manufactures that have popped up over the last 10-20 years, making good quality drums.

And the big manufacturers keep coming up with new variations. The last NAMM show I was at 2 years ago, Pearl had easily double the number of lines it had back when I worked for a top Pearl dealer. At the DW booth, some of the DW (non-collector lines) and PDP stuff was so close in the description, I had to ask what the difference is, and I still am not sure. And the list goes on.

In general, one can buy a mid-line kit now that would be on par of a high-end kit from 30 years ago.

So, as these increased choices hit the new market, they even eventually hit the used market.

Now, if you want a decent quality drum kit, you have so many choices.

And then it comes into, why pay $3000 for a top-end kit when a $1500 kit is close? And why pay $1500 when a used version can be had for $900?
And if you can get a used 1/2 way decent kit for $900, the demand for the used $3000 kit goes down.

Sure, there will always be exceptions for certain rare/vintage kits.

But so much very nice stuff is widely available.

And then, as mentioned, Ebay used to be the only game in town and was largely just individual sellers. Now ebay has a ton of competition, and many sellers on such sites are more than just a person trying to sell something out of their garage.

I don't look at used kits very often, but when I do, I'm surprised to see some of the same sets still for sale months or years later.
 

DaleClark

Senior Member
The low end drum market is absolutely flooded. So many buy beginner kits never to learn drums and try to recover the cost. People ask me about first time drum sets, I always say study prices and buy used.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
I don't look at used kits very often, but when I do, I'm surprised to see some of the same sets still for sale months or years later.
Bottom line. And I just don't understand why there are apparently still people willing to pay top $$$$ for used kits (as noted by Chunkaway). Do they not research the market? Are they entranced by an individual kit and willing to pay any price to get it? Have they just heard (and mostly from the sellers of "classic" gear, I might note) that classic gear is a "good investment, and going up," as I saw one dealer post last year?

GeeDeeEmm
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
If I get what I paid for a set or a little more then I know the buyer is educated, Once they pounce on the flooded low end market for the bargain of the century then they will realise you do mostly get what you pay for. So pony up and play!
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
There's a guy on my local CL that has been trying to sell a bottle of guitar polish for 5 dollars...down from 15....for about 2 years now.

It just makes me wonder.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
This is why you agree to meet at the local cop shop. That quickly weeds out the dishonest schmucks, and keeps the people you do meet in check.
That doesn't work for everything, unfortunately. Buyers often want to try things out, and neutral locations aren't always conducive to this. For instance, I have been trying to sell a bass head (as in, an amplifier, not Remo) for a while which is a challenge because I don't want people coming over to my house to try it out (I have no cab anyway). But, from the buyer's perspective it's obviously sketchy since they have no way then to tell if it sounds good or even works, outside of my word. So my options are to: 1. open up my home to strangers 2. sell "as-is" at a reduced price as if the amp were broken 3. offer a return policy which can cause another set of issues.

Me, when I buy something from CL I never expect to be able to try the thing out. Not everybody lives in a Guitar Center, especially in the city. And the point of CL is to get good deals, in which case you have to expect some sort of issues and be OK with it.
 
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MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
They make power inverters for cars so you can plug stuff into it. Some plug into accessory sockets and cigarette lighters, some connect to the battery, and some can be hard wired into the car. This one is $50 and can do all 3. A small price to pay to keep people from going to your house.

6201415_sd.jpg
 
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