Approaching the Instrument

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I’m more interested in this generational gap - how do “they” approach it as opposed to this “other” generation? I can’t really answer until I know what parameters we’re talking about.

To throw out an half-baked answer though: to me, the job of drumming hasn’t changed in over 80 years, so considering that, I would think every generation approaches it the same way. The approach can only change when the expected outcome changes, no?
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Seventy bucks monthly would be a steal. It would be closer to three hundred monthly in my neck of the woods.

Hey, I am a big fan of tea -- English style with milk and sugar. We'll need to rally the forum and have a proper tea party sometime. That would be a fascinating gathering.
$300 is a no go - total show stopper. I'd rather finance a car for that kind of money haha.

I'm down for tea. I've recently become a huge fan of cucumber sandwiches - so it might seem less posh in that setting to make tiny, crustless sandwiches to enjoy haha.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I don't have THAT big of a yard - but we have decent front and back yard and there are some really trusty Mennonite folks here - it's about $70 monthly for them to take care of it.

Well worth it for the job they do.
All the Mennonites I know keep golf-course quality yards and landscaping around their homes. If that’s what you’re getting for $70, you better be thankful. I paid $150 a month for people to randomly mow down my fruit tree saplings. LOL Now I do it myself, again.
 

GOOSE72

Well-known member
I like other views on things. No two people are the same, and the details are where the real person lays. Even though no one may approach the instrument like I do, we all have a mindset. That mindset is what makes us all interesting (or not) and people don't scare me, so I'll ask whatever to whomever. And all these book guys, they constantly present new things to think about, and I like that. Those links toddbishop posts, there's good info in there. The other teachers as well.

I use a pad a lot too, but gave my book to my brother like 20 years ago.

You gotta hit the reset button bro. You went from 0 to 100 on this. You said you approach the instrument like a vehicle of War. Now you are saying this. Might want to regroup.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
I’m more interested in this generational gap - how do “they” approach it as opposed to this “other” generation? I can’t really answer until I know what parameters we’re talking about.

To throw out an half-baked answer though: to me, the job of drumming hasn’t changed in over 80 years, so considering that, I would think every generation approaches it the same way. The approach can only change when the expected outcome changes, no?
I would say that music changing as well - there are people making more difficult and more sophisticated music and you're right in saying that the end result is changing the means (the chops, etc. that I'm speaking about) so the instrument and the music is both evolving.

I'll throw out some examples of the players and the music:

Andy Prado Jr in the context of his band:

http://instagr.am/p/CDCiiFFgw1z/
http://instagr.am/p/CC9HX_Dg7R_/
Andy solo:



Forrest Rice Shedding over a track:


Forrest Rice in the context of his band:


Maison Guidry is in the same lines (and actually he's here on DW):




So to your point - I would say the drumming AND the music is evolving.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
All the Mennonites I know keep golf-course quality yards and landscaping around their homes. If that’s what you’re getting for $70, you better be thankful. I paid $150 a month for people to randomly mow down my fruit tree saplings. LOL Now I do it myself, again.
Yea - this isn't the best pic of the whole yard - but this house before quarantine and after haha - they came in and layed some sod, new sprinklers, and mow it (and we got new fencing and refrigerated air this year too and some back yard furniture).

Golf Course feels about right haha.
 

Attachments

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Yea - this isn't the best pic of the whole yard - but this house before quarantine and after haha - they came in and layed some sod, new sprinklers, and mow it (and we got new fencing and refrigerated air this year too and some back yard furniture).

Golf Course feels about right haha.
The Mennonites around here keep such beautiful yards and homes that it’s nearly frightening. LOL
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
You gotta hit the reset button bro. You went from 0 to 100 on this. You said you approach the instrument like a vehicle of War. Now you are saying this. Might want to regroup.
What? Approaching the drumset and why I start a thread are two different things. What exactly are you trying to say? I'm confused.
 

iCe

Senior Member
I always approach the drums from behind like a predator stalking an unsuspected prey. All puns aside...
The more i think about it, when i sit behind my kit all i experience is being there. I don't get excited or nervous (well maybe if i would play for like 100.000 people), but i feel calm and prepared for what is to come. I enjoy playing the drums en listening to them (and cymbals etc.), but when playing songs I'm concentrating at the same time. Even with heavier songs that needs some extra attitude, i still approach them calmly. Noticed that if I'm laid back and in control, i play better. If i would play louder and harder for the sake of performance, i guess i would be on my 4th K Dark Thin crash because i would crack them like crazy. Even when i'm relaxed there is a considerable amount of noise coming from me (bass player once said that he was surprised on how loud i was compared to how comfy i sat behind the set) so i know i don't need to put extra effort in making db's.

But I've heard to looking at me drumming is somewhat like Neil Peart; not showing real emotion, but more in control and focusing on playing right
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
The only thing I ever go to war with is my lawn. I hate mowing it. I can't wait for winter to return. I'd rather shovel snow every day than cut grass once a year.
😂😂😂

I moved from a house with a patch of grass that took me 20 minutes to mow (and that included a walk-through first to pick up sticks & debris), to 3 acres of lawn that takes two guys on $15,000 John Deere zero-turn mowers about 45 minutes to mow. Thank God for these guys. I’ll be in my studio perfectly comfortable while they’re out there either sweating or freezing. Wifey brings ‘em cookies so they keep coming back.

I approach my drumming as a method to help people dance and move and forget about their jobs.

Years ago, at a big tailgate event, I played a simple funky beat for sound check and all the ladies’ butts started moving. That’s when the lightbulb lit up.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
😂😂😂

I moved from a house with a patch of grass that took me 20 minutes to mow (and that included a walk-through first to pick up sticks & debris), to 3 acres of lawn that takes two guys on $15,000 John Deere zero-turn mowers about 45 minutes to mow. Thank God for these guys. I’ll be in my studio perfectly comfortable while they’re out there either sweating or freezing. Wifey brings ‘em cookies so they keep coming back.

I approach my drumming as a method to help people dance and move and forget about their jobs.

Years ago, at a big tailgate event, I played a simple funky beat for sound check and all the ladies’ butts started moving. That’s when the lightbulb lit up.
I'm on about half an acre -- not enough to justify a John Deere but too much for a push mower. A John Deere would be problematic anyway, as my land is quite hilly. I'll never have to worry about flooding, but mowing is a colossal pain.

Years ago, when my wife and I resided in an urban townhome, we had no grass at all, just decorative concrete. Pure heaven from a maintenance standpoint. Perhaps next summer I'll turn my entire lawn into a rock garden.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I'm on about half an acre -- not enough to justify a John Deere but too much for a push mower. A John Deere would be problematic anyway, as my land is quite hilly. I'll never have to worry about flooding, but mowing is a colossal pain.

Years ago, when my wife and I resided in an urban townhome, we had no grass at all, just decorative concrete. Pure heaven from a maintenance standpoint. Perhaps next summer I'll turn my entire lawn into a rock garden.
Lol I'm mowing as soon as I finish my coffee and feed the dogs. Push mower, on a mountain, tons of rocks. We are on an acre but it's the woods so I only mow maybe half.

Before we moved to the mountain 5 years ago we live in the city, packed in like sardines with the postage stamp lawn. I could have a perfectly manicured lawn in about an hour. That's including weed eating, edging, and sweeping when I was done.

Mowing now takes like 3 hours. Just mowing. Screw weed eating. In the woods no one cares.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Lol I'm mowing as soon as I finish my coffee and feed the dogs. Push mower, on a mountain, tons of rocks. We are on an acre but it's the woods so I only mow maybe half.

Before we moved to the mountain 5 years ago we live in the city, packed in like sardines with the postage stamp lawn. I could have a perfectly manicured lawn in about an hour. That's including weed eating, edging, and sweeping when I was done.

Mowing now takes like 3 hours. Just mowing. Screw weed eating. In the woods no one cares.
I'd rather be in a dentist's chair than address three hours of yardwork. It's not that I'm lazy. On the contrary, I'm highly active. Investing myself in my lawn is simply contrary to my value system. Grass is to be conquered, not nurtured. When you nurture it, it grows. I find that outcome offensive.

I do have a dutiful neighbor who attends to weed control for me. That greatly reduces my burden.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
So where is your head when you sit down? Do you prepare for war? Are you riding a
chocolate unicorn? How does your headspace influence your drumming, or better yet, how does your drumming influence your headspace?
You know, I've been thinking about this, and it's hard to say where my head is when I sit down. I've usually got specific songs in my head to work on, but that's about it. While I love playing music more than just about anything, there's not one specific feeling I have when I sit to play...not even at gigs. While I enjoy the work, I feel like I'm there to do a job.
 

moodman

Well-known member
I just sit down in my favorite place on the planet like I have for 59 years. Practice room or stage, I'm still diggin' what got me there in the first place, playing drums.
Mowing? I'm praying I get healed enough to mow again, paying $80 at 2 places for the moment.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Lol you need astroturf! Or goats. Goats are nature's yard workers.
Turf would be low maintenance, though half an acre of it would look absurd. My father-in-law resides in Arizona and has a small patch of turf surrounded by rocks.. Arizona is hostile to most things floral. I approve of it for that reason, but the weather is stifling.

Goats exceed my capacity for husbandry. They pride themselves upon obstinance. I'm better off dealing with motionless grass.
 
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