Anyone travel with a drum riser?

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I’ve been going back and forth for years as to whether or not to travel with a drum riser. If you do, what kind of riser do you use, and what do you haul it with? Thanks!
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
If I had a road crew I would consider it.
 

BobC

Member
I did travel with a homemade riser when I was in the Clapton tribute band. Our bass player built it out of two thick plywood sheets, covered it with thin industrial carpeting, and a border of some type around the edges so the carpet wouldn't fray. He installed hinges so the two halves would attach. We used old wallpaper paste buckets underneath for support. I carried the two upper halves, and he carried the buckets. On gigs, we covered it with an extra large black tablecloth. It looked good and did the job, but it was a PITA to deal with ultimately. The halves I carried were bulky and unwieldy for me. I had to use a larger drumset on that gig and the riser was just added baggage to deal with. Our bass player measured the inside of my Subaru Outback so it would fit in the car.

I'd love to have a riser on gigs where we have the room for it, but I'm not going to lug one around again. That would be a job for the road crew, and we don't have a road crew.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
I've been struggling with this thought for a few years now. I know how much better it looks, but I don't wanna add significantly more setup and teardown time to the operation. Not to mention negotiating storing it in the band trailer, which isn't mine. All for something that we might not use very often, cuz of stage logistics in the places we play.

I did a fill in with another band 5-6 weeks ago. They had their own. They admitted it was pretty redneck as they described it to me. Basically it was two fairly stout pieces of plywood, laid out on 13 buckets. (Yes, I counted the buckets, and yes, I still struggle with the math and the why about 13). Threw a black piece of fabric over it and that was it. It was surprisingly steady. The singer even got up on the edge some while we played. I was skeptical initially, but it was good. The setup and teardown was very minimal.

Now I'm trying to talk myself into initiating the discussion with our band leader to do something similar. Ha!
 

vyacheslav

Senior Member
I've thought about this some. I had an idea of using wood delivery pallets that we all see and know. I thought about assembling 4 together for a drum riser, but having all 4 be individually transportable. You could turn the pallets upside down so the hollow part is up and have access to some bolt/nut method to keep them together (or take them apart). Put 4 individual pieces of plywood on top (one per pallet) that should be a fairly level and sturdy surface when assembled all together with the screws and nuts. Carrying 4 pallets would be a chore though, even if you had the room.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
No.
I've had risers in practice spaces, but I never traveled with one.

Most clubs that are big enough to have a riser have one. The clubs that aren't that big, well, aren't that big.
 
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cbphoto

Diamond Member

jda

Well-known Member
I'll usually take -2- Roman candles along in my stick bag
 
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KEEF

Senior Member
Not for the venues I play - but if I were playing the stages you are PPG - I'd definitely have one!
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
He installed hinges so the two halves would attach. It looked good and did the job, but it was a PITA to deal with ultimately. The halves I carried were bulky and unwieldy for me. I had to use a larger drumset on that gig and the riser was just added baggage to deal with.

I'd love to have a riser on gigs where we have the room for it, but I'm not going to lug one around again. That would be a job for the road crew, and we don't have a road crew.
Reminds me of the behind the scenes of Neil Peart's Anatomy of a Drum Solo. Where they film the set up & how the crew has to marry the two halves of his spinning riser together.
Took a crew to do it & I imagine what you must've went through doing that.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I wish. Plus decent lights that help me look cool. Plus a decent monitor system.

In my dreams I'd consider one of these offerings:

I’ve been looking at the intellistage offerings from Sweetwater. I’ve played on a couple of those and they are really stable. I think if I was going to do anything, I would do one of those. I need to set my kit up and measure how much room I would actually need.

I don't think I would use it at every gig; however, there have been a few times where I could have really used it. I played a really nice hall a week or so ago (an auditorium at a college), and even though I was told there would be a riser, there was not one. To me, if you play a place like that (nice big stage, big PA, nice auditorium, etc.) without a drum riser, it looks like you are putting on a local talent show.

I played a place about a month ago where we had a "stage area" set up outside, and it was just big enough to get everyone on it, but we couldn't move around too much. It would have been really nice to put a rise right behind it that way I would have my elevated space and the guys could have the rest of the stage area to do whatever.

With that said, we still find ourselves in plenty of places where the rooms are small, and there wouldn't even be room for one if I had one. Also, we are also still playing places where we get done at dark-thirty, and I start tearing down while the final note is still ringing. The last thing I would want to do is tear down a riser. I think it's one of the many things that I like the idea of having a riser, but maybe it's just a bad idea to sling one around all the time. I think that drum risers and drum racks are ideas that I revisit every couple of years for some reason. I've never done either, but I have thought about them a lot.
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
I’ve been looking at the intellistage offerings from Sweetwater. I’ve played on a couple of those and they are really stable. I think if I was going to do anything, I would do one of those. I need to set my kit up and measure how much room I would actually need.

I don't think I would use it at every gig; however, there have been a few times where I could have really used it. I played a really nice hall a week or so ago (an auditorium at a college), and even though I was told there would be a riser, there was not one. To me, if you play a place like that (nice big stage, big PA, nice auditorium, etc.) without a drum riser, it looks like you are putting on a local talent show.

I played a place about a month ago where we had a "stage area" set up outside, and it was just big enough to get everyone on it, but we couldn't move around too much. It would have been really nice to put a rise right behind it that way I would have my elevated space and the guys could have the rest of the stage area to do whatever.

With that said, we still find ourselves in plenty of places where the rooms are small, and there wouldn't even be room for one if I had one. Also, we are also still playing places where we get done at dark-thirty, and I start tearing down while the final note is still ringing. The last thing I would want to do is tear down a riser. I think it's one of the many things that I like the idea of having a riser, but maybe it's just a bad idea to sling one around all the time. I think that drum risers and drum racks are ideas that I revisit every couple of years for some reason. I've never done either, but I have thought about them a lot.
12’x8‘ seems perfect to me. An combo amp could go up on a corner if needed.

Its use would depend on the size of the venue and load-in considerations. I’ve only played on a few risers and it is a nice view of things.
 

BobC

Member
Reminds me of the behind the scenes of Neil Peart's Anatomy of a Drum Solo. Where they film the set up & how the crew has to marry the two halves of his spinning riser together.
Took a crew to do it & I imagine what you must've went through doing that.
Thanks. I carried the two halves, and they were very large and extremely cumbersome for me to manage. I did it, but hated dealing with it.

I came away with the knowledge that drum risers are great...as long as someone else has to deal with them!
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
We've chatted about it internally as a band - but the juice just doesn't seem worth the squeeze. I don't feel like hauling it around or setting it up just to be slightly higher in the mix...I just enjoy it when venues happen to have one.
 
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