anyone play 16x13 floor toms

Hi,

I'm considering a pre-made Sonor SQ2 at a good price. It has a 16x13 floor tom.

I've never actually played a 16 that shallow before. Because of where I'm located getting to the shop to try it in person is actually impossible with current travel restrictions. So if I went for it I'd have to buy without trying first.

Now, it's a Sonor SQ2 so I know the kit will be great. But does anyone know how it might differ to a 16x16 or 16x15? Guessing it's going to have more attack, be a bit less ringy.

Would there be any down sides? I'd be using it for rock and sometimes I'd go a bit heavier with full on metal.
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
Are you really going to buy an SQ2 without trying it first? I'd wait a bit until you can go to the store, especially since you don't know how a 16x13 will sound like, and videos with perfect mic positioning and EQed sound aren't going to be very accurate.
 

calan

Silver Member
Yeah, maybe a slightly quicker note.

My 4 pc kit uses a 16x13. Used to be floating, but no longer. I can't think of one time anybody has come up to me on a set break to say "that floor tom would sound better if it were three inches deeper."
 

bongoman

Junior Member
I use a few different shallow depth floor toms on different kits. I find them just a bit easier to tune for an open, pitched tone. For an unpitched thud I find deeper shells a little easier; or I just take the reso head off.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
One of my DW Collectors kits had both a 14x11 and 16x13 hanging toms, which I later installed legs on. They sounded fine as floor toms and other drummers never said they sounded wrong. But the aesthetic did bug me after a while.

You may be faced with the same dilemma of not liking it because of the look, but buying it because of what it is. I say don’t fall for it. If you had the $$$$ to buy an SQ2, it should be the sizes you say it is. Over the years I made do with used high end kits only to end up back where I started: 9x13/16x16/16x22
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
I've learned to balance diameter with depth. A large diameter drum with a shallow depth just sounds funky (unless it's designed to be like that like a gong drum).
Same for the other way too. Too deep with less diameter & it's getting into the Octoban category.

The smallest "floor tom" I've had was a 13x9 on a small bop kit. Tuned well & did a great job for what it was designed for.
 

MusiQmaN

Platinum Member
I use a 15x14 and 18x14 my self and love the shallower sizes icw the wood mix which make for a huge and warm tone.
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
Both my DW kits have 16x13 and 14x11 floor toms. They sound great. Like Bo, I prefer the aesthetic of deeper floor toms. I'm considering adding 14, 15, 16 square floor toms, or possibly 1" under square. I have 15x14 and 14x13 floor toms on another kit and they sound great too.
 
Are you really going to buy an SQ2 without trying it first? I'd wait a bit until you can go to the store, especially since you don't know how a 16x13 will sound like, and videos with perfect mic positioning and EQed sound aren't going to be very accurate.
I have had to buy sonor in the past without trying and thankfully I was never disappointed. It's mainly due to the lack of stock in my country. When our one Sonor dealer runs out of stock it can take them years before they bring in more Sonor gear. Playing the SQ2 isn't possible because it's actually in a different European country. Yes, I could travel there in less than an hour. But, that can't happen any time soon. And I'm looking at getting a kit pretty soon.

I'm also considering an SQ1 which I have played in person. It's smaller sizes which might better suit the space I have. Really the SQ2 caught my eye because its at a good price. That might be due to the fact the shallow tops are off putting to buyers. I think its been in the store for quite some time and they are trying to blow it out with a deal.

But I always thought if I went SQ2 i'd go with my own custom order. But its vintage beech shells got my attention because if i was to get a custom SQ2 that's what I'd go for.

Might just go SQ1 in GT black.
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
I have had to buy sonor in the past without trying and thankfully I was never disappointed. It's mainly due to the lack of stock in my country. When our one Sonor dealer runs out of stock it can take them years before they bring in more Sonor gear. Playing the SQ2 isn't possible because it's actually in a different European country. Yes, I could travel there in less than an hour. But, that can't happen any time soon. And I'm looking at getting a kit pretty soon.

I'm also considering an SQ1 which I have played in person. It's smaller sizes which might better suit the space I have. Really the SQ2 caught my eye because its at a good price. That might be due to the fact the shallow tops are off putting to buyers. I think its been in the store for quite some time and they are trying to blow it out with a deal.

But I always thought if I went SQ2 i'd go with my own custom order. But its vintage beech shells got my attention because if i was to get a custom SQ2 that's what I'd go for.

Might just go SQ1 in GT black.
If you have positive experience with the SQ1 I'd go with that. It's not a bad kit at all, I'd say it's on the level of the Classic Maple, Pearl Masters Reserve and Tama Starclassic W/B. Also if space is a concern, you should note that the footprint of the 22" configuration isn't drastically different to the 20", so if you can fit a 20/12/14, you can also use a 22/12/16 unless you play in a tiny shed that limits even the 20" config.

If the shop has a good return policy, you should try out the SQ2 that way.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
16 x 14 is an optimum size for me. 16 x 13 should also work well. Essentially, all other things being equal, the more shallow the drum, the more prominent the fundamental, & the less overtones in the mix (both the ones you want, & the ones you don't).

There is another benefit to a shallow (shallow to a point) floor tom, & that's distance of reso head from the floor. The bigger the distance, the more the waveforms are able to resolve. Closer proximity to the floor often chokes a floor tom.
 
If you have positive experience with the SQ1 I'd go with that. It's not a bad kit at all, I'd say it's on the level of the Classic Maple, Pearl Masters Reserve and Tama Starclassic W/B. Also if space is a concern, you should note that the footprint of the 22" configuration isn't drastically different to the 20", so if you can fit a 20/12/14, you can also use a 22/12/16 unless you play in a tiny shed that limits even the 20" config.

If the shop has a good return policy, you should try out the SQ2 that way.
The space is tiny. The 20 seems more attractive. I've played them, but never owned one. The 22 feels like it might be overkill for my needs. It won't be used live. The difference would actually be 12/14/20 or 10/12/16/22. The kick being deeper. With the tight space I might be forced to only use one rack tom so I can get my ride where I like it. So the SQ1 set up is looking like the more sensible set up for now. If I ever do go for an SQ2 it might be better to do my own custom order anyway.
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
The space is tiny. The 20 seems more attractive. I've played them, but never owned one. The 22 feels like it might be overkill for my needs. It won't be used live. The difference would actually be 12/14/20 or 10/12/16/22. The kick being deeper. With the tight space I might be forced to only use one rack tom so I can get my ride where I like it. So the SQ1 set up is looking like the more sensible set up for now. If I ever do go for an SQ2 it might be better to do my own custom order anyway.
Deeper by 2" at most, but it's your space, you get what you really want. Also the 22" config comes with an extra tom, so you could use a 10 or 12 depending on the music you play, or sometimes to be creative.
 

tfgretsch

Junior Member
16 x 14 is an optimum size for me. 16 x 13 should also work well. Essentially, all other things being equal, the more shallow the drum, the more prominent the fundamental, & the less overtones in the mix (both the ones you want, & the ones you don't).

There is another benefit to a shallow (shallow to a point) floor tom, & that's distance of reso head from the floor. The bigger the distance, the more the waveforms are able to resolve. Closer proximity to the floor often chokes a floor tom.
Andy can you get a nice low sound from the 16x14 Fl tom ?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Andy can you get a nice low sound from the 16x14 Fl tom ?
I'll answer until Andy answers. The 16" diameter makes the low sound, so yes. The shell depth changes the timbre or overall sound/personality of the note, and the diameter defines the range of frequency that the drum is best suited for. If you had a 16 x 14 FT compared to a 16" Rototom...you could still get the same notes as the larger drum on the Rototom...it will just have less afterglow and personality. You get the same note but with no "shell personality", because there's no shell
 
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Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I'll answer until Andy answers. The 16" diameter makes the low sound, so yes. The shell depth changes the timbre or overall sound/personality of the note, and the diameter defines the range of frequency that the drum is best suited for.
Thanks Larry - yes - pitch is dictated by diameter & tensioning.

Andy can you get a nice low sound from the 16x14 Fl tom ?
Absolutely. There's a misperception that deeper shell = more low end produced. All other things being equal, depth of shell simply changes the ratio of fundamental to overtones.

I've done a fair bit of experimentation with floor tom depth over the years, & in most situations, the optimum depth for me is 14" (yes, even on an 18" floor tom). Coincidentally, same for bass drums. Amount of useable low end produced has never been lacking, & in many situations, the greater prominence of fundamental helps that low end tone transport better in the FOH mix, both mic'd & unmic'd.
 

tfgretsch

Junior Member
Thanks Larry - yes - pitch is dictated by diameter & tensioning.

Absolutely. There's a misperception that deeper shell = more low end produced. All other things being equal, depth of shell simply changes the ratio of fundamental to overtones.

I've done a fair bit of experimentation with floor tom depth over the years, & in most situations, the optimum depth for me is 14" (yes, even on an 18" floor tom). Coincidentally, same for bass drums. Amount of useable low end produced has never been lacking, & in many situations, the greater prominence of fundamental helps that low end tone transport better in the FOH mix, both mic'd & unmic'd.
thanks for your feedback Andy
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
thanks for your feedback Andy
No problem, but bear in mind my reference points are either with respect to specific builds, or my personal preferences. That said, I probably have over 60 floor toms out there at 14" depth - mostly 16" diameter, and I've never had anything but glowing feedback on the level of useable low end produced.
 
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