Anyone out there studied with Dave Elitech?

drums1959

New member
I recently bought his Technique course - get out of your own way. He really seems to break hand technique down to being very simple.
There is no mention of upstrokes, downstrokes, tap strokes. Finger control is not needed - a no no. No mention of push/pull technique.

His whole technique comes down to learn how to control the rebound - how to get what he call's a "true double".
The only exercises mentioned in the course are related to working with a metronome and achieving the "true double".
At first done at slow tempo's , then when locked in on that build up the tempo.

So I am wondering for those who studied with him - does he make it that simple working in lessons with him?
What king of exercises for the hands does he give once the "true double" is achieved.

I mean the 2 he gives are always something to be worked in. I imagine he must recommend working thru rudiments
as well, and perhap's some reading exercises (Stick Control ?) - just using his technique methods.

Anyway I'd love to hear back from anyone who studied hand technique directly with him.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
I’ve brought several students from “no double stroke” to “nice fluttery doubles” over the years, and I’ve noticed a few things. First, there is no magical exercise that will guarantee success in the long term. The truth is that the student needs to learn and practice about 7 different exercises, in order to succeed. Second, as a teacher, I need to present that learning good doubles is mandatory. I'll say that we're going to practice them in every lesson, at least for 5 minutes, until your doubles are good. Y"ou want to work on a fill or a song? Cool, but doubles come first. So, practice at home!". Third, a pad is mandatory, but pillows are not.

As I mentioned, there's several techniques/exercises to become proficient at:

1. Push-pull (or "throw-catch" if you prefer) -- a few different exercises here, starting without even holding the stick.
2. Isolated diddles exercise
3. Accenting the second note of each double, using Moeller technique, and downstroke technique
4. All four permutations of double strokes, including inverted
5. The four permutations, alternating with singles
6. Various exercises using the technique in #3
7. Accent exercises where the accents become doubles, and where the non-accents become doubles
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
I doubt someone NEEDS to learn those 7 techniques to play a simple double stroke roll. I mean I never practiced that and my students too and they all play AND READ double strokes rolls from the first lessons.
I think the push/pull exercise can be removed sine that is primarily a technique thing. I do think having more than one check pattern or exercise for doubles can only do good though.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
I think the push/pull exercise can be removed sine that is primarily a technique thing. I do think having more than one check pattern or exercise for doubles can only do good though.
Totally agree on using check patterns! The isolated diddle exercise I mentioned works in a similar way.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
I doubt someone NEEDS to learn those 7 techniques to play a simple double stroke roll. I mean I never practiced that and my students too and they all play AND READ double strokes rolls from the first lesson.

I´m saying this INDEPENDENTLY of how Dave Elitch methods are, i known him as a player for over 10 years but I´m not into him, or even know his particulary methods of teaching, I´m talking strictly about mine wich are in escence the same I have been using for over 40 years.

Here one of my students (I have way younger and way older):
View attachment 88289
Well, each student is different. If you didn't need 7 exercises, great. Some students may only need two or three. But, in my experience, RARELY is there ONLY ONE exercise that leads to double stroke competency.

None of these students of mine ever studied that:
The "Baby Rolls" exercise above is essentially the same as using check patterns.
 

Alex Sanguinetti

Silver Member
Anyway, I´m going to erase all that because it has nothing to do with Dave Elitch and I don´t have the time to explain why I think all those techniques (push-pull, moeller, etc.) to me are a waste of time (specially in the context mentioned: playing double stroke rolls).... take care guys!

 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Just curious, do y'all that teach ever talk about how the doubles are supposed to feel with your students? I only ask this because that's what actually got them to work for me. Until I realized that doubles feel different than singles and recognised that feeling, I was stuck for a long time. It went from trying to play 2 singles at a time to feeling and returning the rebound in one movement instead of 2.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Just curious, do y'all that teach ever talk about how the doubles are supposed to feel with your students? I only ask this because that's what actually got them to work for me. Until I realized that doubles feel different than singles and recognised that feeling, I was stuck for a long time. It went from trying to play 2 singles at a time to feeling and returning the rebound in one movement instead of 2.
Totally, and that's why we do Push-Pull/Throw-Catch. The student gets to feel the fingers snapping the second stroke. I also record slow-motion of myself to show them the snapping motion at high speeds.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Literally no one has answered the original question. Dave Elitch is a beast around the kit, though. I’m sure he’s worth studying with. I could name 15 other guys off the top of my head who I’d also study with if I was a beginner, too.

As far as hand technique goes, I don’t think you can beat a guy like Danny Gottlieb, because of his blazing speed and connection to the Morello/Stone teaching lineage. But there are plenty of other incredible players out there to study with, even just on hand technique.

And I STILL didn’t answer the question. LOL
 
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