Anyone else experience..."the bum out" with gear you liked?

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
When I was a kid (80's), I lusted after the Yamaha Black Recording Custom kit. When I got money, I had all the 700, then 900 hardware (for a long time--red/black sticker generation of it).
Those drums were IT for me. I had it baaaad.

When it came time to buy a new drum kit ('89), Yamaha were only a bit more expensive than I expected, BUT, they didn't have the size bass drum I REALLY wanted, I wasn't going to compromise on that, they don't do custom orders, so I went with Ludwig (and Black lacquer, & long lugs became a standard that year ;-) ).

Anyway, fast forward several years, and I finally actually PLAY an RC.
It was a back line kit, in great shape, decent heads, and I tweaked it to suit for the gig. All is well. Then we started playing, and those drums just did NOTHING for me.

It was kind of a bubble burster, and a bum out.

Out front, the sound was good, no problem there, but from behind the kit, it was not giving me anything. It felt cold.

I played that same kit last Saturday on a gig (about 5 years since the first time), the kit is still in great shape, but, they did the same thing.
Through the mains, the sound from the ft was GREAT, the bass drum had oomph and punch. The 10 was kinda dead, but the 12 was fine, but sitting behind them, nothing. Behind it, that bass drum was really dead, but through the speakers it was fat and solid.

They had the Pinstripes/Clear Ambassador combo they always came with, and I wondered if they give back "more" if they had Coated Ambassadors, or Emps.

Is that just the nature of that line of drums?
Is it the Birch?
Does that wood just record great, and just sound fuller "out front", more than behind it?

Even though the kit doesn't do it for me playing it, I still think they are super drums--especially the ones before the YESS thing came about. I still looked at the kit and went "oh man..."

Anyone else ever have this happen?
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I think it's the birch. I had a RC kit back in the 80s (a Paul Wertico version when he played with Metheny), and a 80s Tama Superstar (also birch), and just this past year a Tama Granstar (birch) - and I'll admit, they did sound better out front. They project away the sound, which I guess is a good thing, but I think it made me overplay because I wasn't feeling it as much.

When I turn around and play my late-70s Ludwigs, or my Slingerland kit from 78, both maple, they just seem to resonate right there where I am, and it projects that sound as well. I never thought I'd care about the type of wood, but I guess there's a reason maple is a standard drum wood. Birch too, but it reacts differently, which doesn't mean it's bad, that's just the way it is.

When Tama did the birch/bubinga thing, I think that was a nice improvement because those drums sounded great where I was and projected really well too.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Pinstripes was THE standard head used on RCs and Superstars fron the 80's on.

I switched over to coated ambassador batters and clear ambassador for the resos or evans G12's for the batters and it really opened up the Superstars.

I played a set of Yamaha RC's in black lacquer about a year ago or so and they had the stock heads on the reso side and coated G12's on the batter I think,and they just SANG.What beautiful sounding....and looking drums.

All the toms were RIMS mounted.

Single ply coated or clear work so much better tnah 2 ply "wet" heads on birch drums.IMHO.

Steve B
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
To answer the basic question, I kind of feel bummed out every time I get new gear, lol. I tend to research a lot and make a selection based in certain features, but every instrument has strengths and limitations. As soon as the "new" has worn off and I come up against those limitations I kind of have buyer's remorse.

I have pretty much learned to stop chasing gear Nirvana. It cost me a lot of money over the years!
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
I don't like the sound I get while playing my Paiste 2002 18" China cymbal. Though it sounds good from a distance and with other instruments. I just don't like it up close. Weird.
 

Bull

Gold Member
I always loved the recorded sounds of LM402s,but for some reason,I never had one. Last year, I finally got one. At first,I was in love. When I started playing in my current project,I became a little less enamored with it. We are extremely loud and tuned down. I just don't like where it sits in the mix from my standpoint. I am sure it will sound great through the P,A, I am just much happier with my Coliseum's(my lifelong #1 snare) or my Brass Sensitone. I am still going to take it into the studio and see what I can get out of it.
 

Smoke

Silver Member
They had the Pinstripes/Clear Ambassador combo they always came with, and I wondered if they give back "more" if they had Coated Ambassadors, or Emps.

Can't speak for RCs, but I replaced Clear Pinstripes/Clear Ambs with Coated Ambs/Clear Diplomats and my 16 year old Stage Customs really woke up from behind the kit. I'm not sure how to describe it, but I'd guess I'm hearing more of the shell than just the head.
 

brady

Platinum Member
I picked up a 22" Zildjian K Constantinople Bounce Ride a few years ago. I loved the sound for a quite a while. Eventually I grew tired of it. It always sounded too washy to me; especially once I switched to a different stick model.

I loved the way it opened up easily with brushes but the downside was that there wasn't that much definition when playing with sticks; especially on faster tunes.

I now use a 20" Constantinople Medium Ride. It seems to suit me better right now.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I had my heart all set on a specific ride, listened to every video online I could find, thought I'd love it... When I finally got to see/whack the cymbal I thought I wanted, I heard some dirty overtones that were really not my bag. Back to the drawing board. I'll never trust online cymbal videos again. I need to play a cymbal to buy it, I don't think I'll be able to get anything online.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I wanted a Yamaha Recording Custom badly in the late 80's, early 90's. I used to dream about them. But by the time I was finally in a position to buy one, I felt burned out on the sound. The shop I had worked in sold so many of them. They were on so many records. I knew people who didn't play Yamaha live but used rental RC's for the album.

So I went in a different direction (Premier Signia).

No some 20 odd years later, I feeling nostalgic for that sound. I know a guy who has a set, and when he posts clips, I think, "ah, yeah, that's the sound!"
 

Bad Tempered Clavier

Silver Member
I often play with my bum out, although my wife has asked me not to as it scares the dog.

In answer to your question:

They had the Pinstripes/Clear Ambassador combo they always came with, and I wondered if they give back "more" if they had Coated Ambassadors, or Emps.
I would say yes. I bought a (new) set of RCs a couple of years ago and the Pinstripes were fine when I was playing on my own, but had no bollocks at all on stage or even in a rehearsal setting. Once I'd swapped out the tom batters for coated Emperors and the bass batter for an Aquarian Force 1 (which is about the same as a Remo PS3 I believe) then the kit came alive. I have also found that tuning the toms higher than I hitherto have found their sweet spot. As far as the bass drum goes I recently changed from a Pearl Eliminator to an Iron Cobra and the flat-faced IC beater gives a lot more wallop for my personal preference.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
I'd think it was the heads. I played a set of RCs last night that had EC2 frosted heads on them and it was like playing on pillows. Although out front all mic'd up though a Meyer PA, they sounded great. I have a buddy who has a set with G2 coated on them and they sound like drums, both out front and behind the kit.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I bought a Canopus Zelkova drum, the one carved from a tree trunk. I loved it in the store. But eventually it fell out of favor. It made me realize I like a tensioned shell, one that is bent. Sold it for about half of what I paid for it.
 

eclipseownzu

Gold Member
I sold my first set of professional level cymbals when I joined the military. They were Paiste 2002's that I had bought in a cymbal pack. I absolutely loved them and was sure that they made me a better player.

A few years later I picked the sticks back up again and bought another pack of 2002's. I was less than impressed. I have since played many different cymbals, and I still don't llike the sound of 2002's. I dont know if I had the perfect set of cymbals or if my tastes just changed, but I was really disappointed when I bought those new cymbals.
 

longgun

Gold Member
Not sure if I was bummed out, but I've wanted a Black Beauty since I was a boy first learning about drums

I bought one about 8 months ago, and I liked it, but it wasn't magical like I thought it would be.


Now, don't get me wrong, I love the sound and it is the best snare in my arsenal, I think it was just a case of me expecting too much.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
I would really like to hear and play those RC's with Coated heads. I still think they are cool drums, but that kit just didn't give me anything back. Even the 16, which you'd think you would hear pretty well anyway was kinda quiet to me.
If the heads were new too, that would have made some difference, but that 10" tom had a real difference in sound character compared to the 12 as far as overall resonance.
I like to hear a longer "note" too, and that's probably some of it, because they were pretty "wet" with the PS's.

I was pretty excited to hear that 24" Sabian Bash ride last year, but when I played it, blah.

I was looking for a big ride that I could crash like my 24" APX, but have it be a little smoother like my Giant Beat, just a little bit louder.

The sound of the Bash Ride was just too dirty for me. I was kinda bummed about that, and when I saw they made 21 and 24" versions of it, I was more bummed because for a 2 cymbal set up, I like a 21" and 24" pairing.
20 & 24 works great too, but since I'm being picky...

I ended up buying 20-22-24" 2002 crashes, and a 24" AVH Big ride (along with some 2002 SE15's).
For one band I use the AVH, and for another I use the 24" 2002 crash in the ride spot...I don't really go "ting ting ting" with the ride :)
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
I was pretty excited to hear that 24" Sabian Bash ride last year, but when I played it, blah.

I was looking for a big ride that I could crash like my 24" APX, but have it be a little smoother like my Giant Beat, just a little bit louder.

The sound of the Bash Ride was just too dirty for me. I was kinda bummed about that, and when I saw they made 21 and 24" versions of it, I was more bummed because for a 2 cymbal set up, I like a 21" and 24" pairing.
20 & 24 works great too, but since I'm being picky...

I ended up buying 20-22-24" 2002 crashes, and a 24" AVH Big ride (along with some 2002 SE15's).
For one band I use the AVH, and for another I use the 24" 2002 crash in the ride spot...I don't really go "ting ting ting" with the ride :)
Ride cymbals are typical of the kind of "bum out" I experience.

I got a Paragon ride when the line first came out. I was very happy with it for a short while, then I found it too one dimensional. All ping and nothing else. Plus the bell sound has grown to annoy me - it's very harsh.

At the other extreme, I LOVE the sound of my Istanbul Agop traditional dark ride when it is played alone, but it is very light - just over 1800 grams at 20" - and very dark/mellow. In band situations it easily gets lost in the mix, just because of the low pitch and mellow nature of the sound. Played lightly it has a lovely stick definition, but it washes out if you lay into it at all.

I have yet to find the perfect all around ride...
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
A while back I decided I wanted to get some Paiste crashes after never having any before.

I was able to get some nearly new 18 and 19" signature power crashes from craiglist/ebay at really good prices. And while they sound good, part of me wishes I had gone for the full crashes over the power crashes.

My other "bum" is I was rather excited when Paiste said they were going to bring back the 602 line. Until I found out the price!! That's a bummer.
 

TColumbia37

Silver Member
My first ever guitar. A B.C. Rich Bronze Series Warlock. As you can probably guess, I was like 13 and got it for the looks. I loved the thing. To me, it was the greatest guitar in the world.

As for now, I HATE THEM WITH A PASSION. The only thing they have going for them is that they have good playability for a beginner. They're made of cheap wood, with awful pickups, and really awful electronics all around, and are a huge eye sore to look at.

Every time I see some kid playing one, I just want to donate one of my guitars, so the poor soul will have something suitable to play.

Not necessarily bummed about the guitar itself. More so disappointed that I didn't know better at the time.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
My first ever guitar. A B.C. Rich Bronze Series Warlock. As you can probably guess, I was like 13 and got it for the looks. I loved the thing. To me, it was the greatest guitar in the world.

As for now, I HATE THEM WITH A PASSION. The only thing they have going for them is that they have good playability for a beginner. They're made of cheap wood, with awful pickups, and really awful electronics all around, and are a huge eye sore to look at.

Every time I see some kid playing one, I just want to donate one of my guitars, so the poor soul will have something suitable to play.

Not necessarily bummed about the guitar itself. More so disappointed that I didn't know better at the time.
Perhaps you should send me a guitar so I will know better!
 
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