Anybody use a riser with a 20" bass drum?

yammyfan

Senior Member
As the title states, has anyone tried a riser with their 20" bass drum? I'm looking at the Gibraltar SC-BDPM specifically.

I'm extremely pleased with my 20" bass drum but if I can get even more oomph from it for the negligible cost of a riser, I'll give it a try.


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C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I've never used a bass riser, and I haven't owned a 20" bass drum in a very long time, but I know a jazz drummer who plays a 20" on a regular basis and incorporates a riser as a rule. He likes the beater positioning a riser affords him and also prefers the drum's resonance when elevated a few inches from the ground.

Sorry for the indirect review. It's the best I can do. Good luck if you decide to go that route.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I've never used a bass riser, and I haven't owned a 20" bass drum in a very long time, but I know a jazz drummer who plays a 20" on a regular basis and incorporates a riser as a rule. He likes the beater positioning a riser affords him and also prefers the drum's resonance when elevated a few inches from the ground.

Sorry for the indirect review. It's the best I can do. Good luck if you decide to go that route.
No need to apologize. This is quite helpful.

I came across a review by somebody who used a riser with their 20" bass drum and they absolutely loved what it did for the drum. I figure for 40 bucks, it can't hurt to try. I can always return the riser if I don't like it.

Thanks for the input!
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I ordered the Gibraltar riser from Amazon.

Some reviewers say that the plate that the pedal clamps onto juts out too far, causing the beater to travel past 90 degrees but not everyone reports this problem. I'm looking at photos of the device and thinking that screwing the floor plate behind the top plate should reduce the amount it juts out by a little. I think I'll move the wing nuts behind the plate too, if that's possible.

I'm also considering the Evans Dixson Bass Drum Lift but it's more expensive. It would solve the beater angle dilemma so it's nice to have that option. My pedal is a Yamaha Flying Dragon which is super adjustable. The whole beater angle thing might be moot anyway.
 

Jasta 11

Well-known member
I have an 18" Ludwig Jazzette bass drum that I use once in a while. No riser, i keep the front rim off the ground a little with the legs and the back off with the height of the pedal. Boomy little bass drum, never had an issue with sound or resonance. I use it with no internal muffling and an Evans EMAD with tone ring on the batter side. You say you are please but want more oomph. New head and less muffling? Different bass drum beater? I just switched to a Trick Dead Blow beater, holy crap what punch this thing makes on my 22". I dont know what you have so maybe you already have tried that. My 18 is a little cannon so I would think a 20 would be fine without a gadget attached to it.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
You say you are please but want more oomph. New head and less muffling? Different bass drum beater? I just switched to a Trick Dead Blow beater, holy crap what punch this thing makes on my 22". I dont know what you have so maybe you already have tried that. My 18 is a little cannon so I would think a 20 would be fine without a gadget attached to it.
The kick drum is fantastic as-is but the beater strikes a bit above center which again is fine, but I'm curious to see just how good it can be when striking center. The riser was a small investment that could pay big dividends.

The truth be told, I'm wondering if I should have sprung for the Dixson lift in the first place. It lifts the shell instead of lifting the hoop, like a little set of legs at the back would. Seems to me that would put less stress on the hoop.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
I used a riser on an 18, but not on my 20's.
If you hadn't already ordered, I'd say just stick a thick book under your batter side, give it a good whack, and see if you like it.
 
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Morrisman

Platinum Member
I use a riser on an 18, but not on a 20. The riser moves the pedal further away from the drum, almost an inch further, so I have to push down lower to make contact with the drum head. This in turn makes me sit higher and closer than normal.
All manageable, but it definitely feels different.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I used a riser on y 18, but not on my 20's.
If you hadn't already ordered, I'd say just stick a thick book under your batter side, give it a good whack, and see if you like it.
Not a bad idea.

I'm certain that I'm going to like it. Can't recall playing a bass drum that wasn't at its best when struck in the center. It all boils down to the beater angle thing. Guess I'll find out in two days!
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I canceled my order for the Gibraltar and went with the Dixson instead. Too many reports of the pedal backing away from the drum by an inch or more. That would drive me crazy.

Additionally, the Dixson supports the shell instead of lifting from the hoop. That sounds like a better solution to me.
 

MusiQmaN

Platinum Member
Steve Gadd does.

But I do prefer the Dixson more. Non clamping so no hopp damage, full vibrating and you can leave it on your pedal, which makes for a quick setup and teardown.
 
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J-W

Well-known member
I don't use a 20" bass drum, but I can attest to the sonic difference of getting your bass drum off the floor.

I'm wondering if I should have sprung for the Dixson lift in the first place. It lifts the shell instead of lifting the hoop, like a little set of legs at the back would. Seems to me that would put less stress on the hoop.
I wouldn't be concerned about any stress on the batter hoop since that's what bass drums typically rest on anyway, often with toms loaded on top. The hoop resonates far less than the shell so stress on the hoop will affect resonance much less. In fact, I would rather it rest on the hoop than on the shell like the Dixson does since that is where you don't want to choke the drum. Not that it would a considerable amount given the small contact patch, but when every little bit counts, then every little bit counts.
 

DrumDoug

Senior Member
I used the Dixson for a while. I did find it made the BD sound better, but I stopped using it because it made setting up and packing up a pain. After you put the drum on the lift you have to extend the spurs to level the drum out. That’s fine for a one time getting it set up thing. The problem was that the extended spurs would stick out past the drum when folded up and stuck out of the BD drum case so I couldn’t close it. For me, having to adjust the spur length every time I set up and tore down wasn’t worth the slightly better sound. If I didn’t use cases or left the kit set up all the time, I might use it more.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I wouldn't be concerned about any stress on the batter hoop since that's what bass drums typically rest on anyway, often with toms loaded on top. The hoop resonates far less than the shell so stress on the hoop will affect resonance much less. In fact, I would rather it rest on the hoop than on the shell like the Dixson does since that is where you don't want to choke the drum. Not that it would a considerable amount given the small contact patch, but when every little bit counts, then every little bit counts.
Evidently bass drums have been carrying loads via the batter hoop for years and some of that would be borne by the lugs and tension rods. The front of the drum, however, is supported by legs attached directly to the shell. It just seems logical to me that carrying the load at the back of the drum in more or less the same fashion would result in a more even distribution of the stress. The Gretsch Renown that I am lifting is a heavy drum with heavy rack toms mounted up top. I think there might be a benefit to lifting the shell at the back.
I used the Dixson for a while. I did find it made the BD sound better, but I stopped using it because it made setting up and packing up a pain. After you put the drum on the lift you have to extend the spurs to level the drum out. That’s fine for a one time getting it set up thing. The problem was that the extended spurs would stick out past the drum when folded up and stuck out of the BD drum case so I couldn’t close it. For me, having to adjust the spur length every time I set up and tore down wasn’t worth the slightly better sound. If I didn’t use cases or left the kit set up all the time, I might use it more.
You have a valid point. The kick drum in question is 16" deep so the legs might be alright when folded up anyway. The legs also appear to have a memory lock type device attached to them though I haven't looked at it closely. Not sure if that will be a big help.

I have a Yamaha Stage Custom Birch kit that will probably still see the majority of gig duty so this might not be much of an issue for me. The Renowns will be reserved for 'special' gigs and recording.

Thanks to both of you for the feedback. Food for thought for sure.
 
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J-W

Well-known member
I get what you're saying about the spurs supporting the front and the hoop in the back as standard practice and the logical assumption would be that the batter side would be better supported by spurs as well.
I think Ludwig thought the same thing with their Classic Maples of the 70's, which I own, that have 4 spurs per bass drum (2 front, 2 back). As with most all bass drums, I could certainly tell a difference raising the reso side up off the floor, but when I would do the same with the back there was no noticeable difference. I think if there was, more manufacturers would be doing that and Ludwig would have kept the concept. I feel that is more contact (and pressure) on the bass drum shell, therefore having more potential for choking the shell.
I currently have no spurs on my bass drums and the only points of contact are on the batter hoop (they are basically "suspended"... Cantilevered to be exact) and that really opened them up resonance-wise. They sound much more full than when on spurs on the ground.
Obviously that isn't an option for the average kit, but that's one observation I had when I switched to that mounting configuration.

Either way, you can't go wrong getting that 20" up off the floor whether it be the Gibraltar or the Dixson.
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
As the title states, has anyone tried a riser with their 20" bass drum? I'm looking at the Gibraltar SC-BDPM specifically.

I'm extremely pleased with my 20" bass drum but if I can get even more oomph from it for the negligible cost of a riser, I'll give it a try.
I use the Dixson (Now Evans / D'addario) bass drum lift on my 22 and I LOVE IT. I like where it moved the beater strike - I love that there's zero hoop contact...I've used it for like 10 years now and carry it in my backline bag.

I think you'll love a riser.
 

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opentune

Platinum Member
Many people pointing the lifter centers the 'beater strike' but that is adjustable anyway by changing beater length on your pedal.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I use the Dixson (Now Evans / D'addario) bass drum lift on my 22 and I LOVE IT. I like where it moved the beater strike - I love that there's zero hoop contact...I've used it for like 10 years now and carry it in my backline bag.

I think you'll love a riser.
Cool. I like that I can use it anywhere without fasteners, tools or tape. I have three kits that I gig with regularly and it will be nice to use it with any of them.

The Gibraltar required Allen keys which isn't ideal and it has a reputation for damaging hoops without additional protection. I'm glad I went with the Dixson/Evans model instead.
Many people pointing the lifter centers the 'beater strike' but that is adjustable anyway by changing beater length on your pedal.
Agreed. Shortening the length of the beater shaft has a negative impact on feel, however. This device will protect my hoops, enhance the sound of the drum and allow me to use the identical pedal setup with any drum. Sounds like a winner to me. :)
 
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