any thoughts on SJC drums?

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
if you have a Yamaha drum kit the first thing that comes into my mind is a jazz drummer in a suit playing along to a jazz band that are wearing suits and also playing Yamaha.
And the first thing that comes to my mind is Steve Ashiem of Deicide. Played a show with them. He plays Yamaha. And death metal. See why this doesn't work?

If I think jazz then Rogers, Slingerland, Gretsch, and Ludwig. Definitely not Yamaha.

Tama is thrash metal, Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer, Anthrax.

Sonor is Steve Smith. Nothing more.

Pearl is Ian Paice, Motley Crue, Bon Jovi, Skid Row and most other hair bands. Deep Purple is NOT a hair band. Ian Paice is the man and needed a mention. It's not his fault he played the wrong brand for his genre.

Pearl is also John Longstreth. He is amazing and doesn't receive enough credit.

Generalizations about drummers and their drums only works if we perceive the world in the same way. There are too many variables.
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
I've never played an SJC kit so I have no input on their tone and sound.

What I can say about them is that I looked through what felt like hundreds of finishes for inspiration for when I redo one of my DW kits. I'm not looking for an out of this world design, but I did see elements on a few of their kits that I think would be fine on a kit for me.

I don't know if I'd say they're an innovator in finishes, but they've definitely pushed the envelope and have made people think about different ideas.
 
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bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I don't know if I'd say they're an innovator in finishes, but they've definitely pushed the envelope and have made people think about different ideas
Well, they've certainly shifted the focus from sound to looks & attitude! I can pretty much guarantee that IF you see someone on stage playing SJC and the drums sound good, there's a good chance they're triggered. Or it's Tre Cool with Green Day, in which case his drums actually sound good without any fakery.

Bermuda
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Re the https://www.sjcdrums.com/pages/family page...

Is this even an endorcee list or just customers?
In the very strictest sense of the word, those are all SJC endorsers. I would say that a high percentage are just customers who are thrilled to appear on the SJC site.

Customers as artists is a trend that's become more prevalent over the last 10-15 years or so with the small companies who don't have enough "name" artists. So everyone who buys the brand can be considered an artist, or family, or technically, an endorser. Soultone Cymbals is notorious for having a roster bloated with customers, and only a handful of name players, but they're not the only company. Such companies offer discounts on product, so they are attractive to younger players.

Shouldn't a company show-off their customers to help promote the brand? Of course, why not? But for a player who wants to know if working pros like the brand or not, they often don't get much help when only a few names on a large roster would be considered influential. And that's the key - endorsers have to have influence. A laundry list of customers who were tempted with a low price doesn't mean a whole lot.

Bermuda
 
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airbus172

Well-known member
And the first thing that comes to my mind is Steve Ashiem of Deicide. Played a show with them. He plays Yamaha. And death metal. See why this doesn't work?

If I think jazz then Rogers, Slingerland, Gretsch, and Ludwig. Definitely not Yamaha.

Tama is thrash metal, Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer, Anthrax.

Sonor is Steve Smith. Nothing more.

Pearl is Ian Paice, Motley Crue, Bon Jovi, Skid Row and most other hair bands. Deep Purple is NOT a hair band. Ian Paice is the man and needed a mention. It's not his fault he played the wrong brand for his genre.

Pearl is also John Longstreth. He is amazing and doesn't receive enough credit.

Generalizations about drummers and their drums only works if we perceive the world in the same way. There are too many variables.
this is the point. It’s not ‘generalisation’, I didn’t describe it well. It’s more asking what do these drum companies remind you of? So Yamaha would remind you of, say, metal but Yamaha reminds me of jazz. Everybody’s different. That’s the point. And this thread is about SJC drums.
 

drumnut87

Well-known member
i was at several shows by slipknot recently, and their drummer jay weinberg is an SJC endorsee, and his kits sounds pretty good IMO, mainly when mic'd up, i was there for soundcheck at one of the shows and heard his kit unmic'd, sounded more or less like every other kit on the market thats unmic'd.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
i was at several shows by slipknot recently, and their drummer jay weinberg is an SJC endorsee, and his kits sounds pretty good IMO, mainly when mic'd up, i was there for soundcheck at one of the shows and heard his kit unmic'd, sounded more or less like every other kit on the market thats unmic'd.
He may have specc’d custom bearing edges and shells too.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
i was at several shows by slipknot recently, and their drummer jay weinberg is an SJC endorsee, and his kits sounds pretty good IMO, mainly when mic'd up, i was there for soundcheck at one of the shows and heard his kit unmic'd, sounded more or less like every other kit on the market thats unmic'd.
Jay Weinberg's drum sound is pretty much irrelevant though, given that he always uses triggers with Slipknot.

He may as well play a kit made out of spare tires.

EDIT: I stand corrected, it looks like he uses internal mikes and boatloads of EQ.
 
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drumnut87

Well-known member
Jay Weinberg's drum sound is pretty much irrelevant though, given that he always uses triggers with Slipknot.

He may as well play a kit made out of spare tires.
nope, no triggers involved with jay :) internal mics and a decent amount of EQ'ing on the desk :)
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
and a decent amount of EQ'ing on the desk
That's another major part of the equation, EQ and some reverb or room FX on the drums to give them some tone where little exists, and that's okay in a concert situation. But if the drums aren't up to par to begin with, then they will disappoint on un-mic'd gigs.

I want my drums to sound great in person. I want the toms to sing. If they're mic'd and the sustain is too much, they can be gated. The cure for lively drums is much simpler than the cure for boxey or dead drums.

Bermuda
 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
That would be almost be a funny thread in itself - assuming people people wouldn't get their feeling hurt.

DW - People who play drums as a hobby and can afford a DW with the law firm earnings - or drummers backing up pop stars.
Tama - Rockers
Yamaha - professionals - not a ton of flare but people that need consistent tones....session people or professors at MI, etc.
A&F - Thick rimmed glasses, tattoos, slow beats, skinny jeans, somehow has a ton of money despite being in the music business - social media manager maybe
Gretsch -30+ semi pro....still has a day job but "Serious" about drums - goes to NAMM - social media only mentions drums but still in sales or whatever
SJC - tweens
Pearl - anybody who's found an Export at a flea market or yardsale - weekend warriors
Sonor - Suit and tie - metal glasses - has been to be europe once - posts about it constantly like it didn't happen 3 years ago
Ludwig - 40+ weekend warriors - still likes black oyster pearl...still....
Canopus - jazz dudes. guys who don't want to talk about gear - it's all about the music - not the gear...how high can a floor tom be tuned? A canopus guy will know - but he won't talk about it. Misses the 90's yamaha's with the gold lugs.


I know I'm missing some like Mapex or Dixon, etc...but those are so far off my radar that I have no jokes/stereotypes haha.
Your profile picture looks like you're a Yamaha poster boy. No jokes about them??? LOL
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
yeah, that SJC list looks like a dude/bro party...

when I think of drum companies and personalities, I think of this:

Yamaha and Pearl: marching percussion; concert percussion; a working guy who wants a great sound and a reliable instrument
Ludwig: pre 1980 - classic jazz and bubble gum rock; post 1980-2000 - rough; 2000 on: older guys looking for a recognizable sound
Tama: solid, big loud sound; guys who are hitting it hard, and throwing it in to a van at the end of the night
Slingerland/Gretsch: classic jazz; currently, semi pro gigging guy playing small group jazz, experimental etc...
Rogers: sets for guys who could not get a Ludwig, Slingerland or Gretsch
Sonor: rock and metal...the German Tama;
Premier: 70's/80's British stuff; for some reason, I also think of high end during the 90's
DW: the working man/hobbiest boutique set...when they first came out, I had the same reaction as many have had to the SJC's
GMS/Noble & Cooley/Ayotte: I will never be good enough to deserve one of these!!!! True art!!
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Your profile picture looks like you're a Yamaha poster boy. No jokes about them??? LOL
Yea I don't see enough people playing them to really have jokes.

Except for maybe every church and college having a set of stage customs.

Or - every professional drummer RIGHT UP until about 1995 haha.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Personally, as someone from an orchestral background, all the assumptions people have about SJC players are ones I have about the entire drumset community.

Not really. But yeah, sort of. LOL
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Personally, as someone from an orchestral background, all the assumptions people have about SJC players are ones I have about the entire drumset community.

Not really. But yeah, sort of. LOL
I remember being a drum set guy who thought that all orchestral guys were boring, stuffy, and afraid to actually get good at drums....until I went to college, and majored in music...then I realized that there are Gods and hacks in both arenas, and realized that much of what I learned on tymps/keyboards/and orch snare can be directly related to set playing, and vice versa...

my original stereotype of n orchestral guy was a guy who was seeing how little they actually needed to play, and how not to be heard by anyone. Like they were excited to be irrelevant. And I KNOW that i would have been perceived as the "metal guy" who wanted to play as much as possible, and break everything.

The coolest thing was when all of those walls were torn down
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Sonor is Steve Smith. Nothing more.
Aw - there is a little humor buried in you.

Funny thing about Yamaha and Jazz drummers...I'm with you on that - I never put those two together at all.

I always think Canopus first and foremost - but when I was actually looking at the Yamaha artist roster I saw Antonio Sanchez - Weckl (if you want to call him a jazz drummer) - Terri Lyne Carrington - Gregg Field - Roy Haynes - Ari Hoenig (though we've talked in depth about gear and he really doesn't care much about the gear itself) - Dafnis Prieto - John Riley....and that was just at a quick glance.

So actually though I've never really associated Yamaha with jazz - I guess I can see it now. haha
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I remember being a drum set guy who thought that all orchestral guys were boring, stuffy, and afraid to actually get good at drums....until I went to college, and majored in music...then I realized that there are Gods and hacks in both arenas, and realized that much of what I learned on tymps/keyboards/and orch snare can be directly related to set playing, and vice versa...

my original stereotype of n orchestral guy was a guy who was seeing how little they actually needed to play, and how not to be heard by anyone. Like they were excited to be irrelevant. And I KNOW that i would have been perceived as the "metal guy" who wanted to play as much as possible, and break everything.

The coolest thing was when all of those walls were torn down
There are definitely people who can kill it in both areas. Kenny Aronoff, Bob Becker, etc..
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Totally cool. I find generalizations pretty funny and am mature enough to know that they don’t apply 100% and/or to laugh at myself for being part of the group. :)
All ribbing aside - they are fantastic instruments. They've really built the best drum company out there - not saying that they have the best products or products I like the most - but as a company no is killing it like DW. I'm super stoked to see if they actually revive the Slingerland Brand and work with some of the craftsmen out there that have the Slingerland Equipment (Bernie Stone) or the Employees (Chicago Drums). It would be realllly cool for them to work with those folks to re-build it.

They remind of being the Ferrari of our instrument - which comes with the good and the bad. They are engineered and designed and marketed to be the very best at what they do...and sometimes that comes with a stigma.

I bet your kit sounds awesome!

(Oh and that whole leather hoop thing....what a beautiful idea!)
 
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