Another wacky idea

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I love the sound of metal toms and bass drums.

I had the idea of experimenting with lining the insides of my existing shells with a lining of sheet aluminum, copper, brass...I'd probably go copper.

The lug screws with maybe bigger washers would hold it on

Of course holes would have to be drilled in the metal lining so it doesn't cover the inside lug screws, but once it's done it's done, bam.

If I did experiment, I'd do it to my DW's. It would be reversible and non harmful of course. I'm guessing it wouldn't cost that much, under 100 US

I could even experiment with more or less surface area, for a blend of wood and metal

I could only do it to the smaller drums, as they would benefit the most. I think.

I could use strips of different metals.

I'm just spitballin.

I'd probably use that spray rubber stuff on the side of the copper that touches the inside of the shell for no buzzes.

Thoughts?
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Gut instinct tells me that lining the drums would give a very different sound than actual metal drums.

It would be an interesting experiment, though.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
What thickness?

edit: also consider “vibra-fibing” your shells instead?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
If you enjoy the manual labor, that’d be interesting to see. It seems to be a lot of work though. But if you use the rubber spray, then it’s kinda permanent, no?
I was thinking of cutting the metal to size, spraying the back of it with the rubberized stuff, letting it dry, then drilling and installing
Gut instinct tells me that lining the drums would give a very different sound than actual metal drums.

It would be an interesting experiment, though.
I think they would take on more of a metal tom tone, but that's just a guess.
What thickness?

edit: also consider “vibra-fibing” your shells instead?
I don't know what vibra fibing means.

Thin as I can get on the sheet metal insert. Probably 1/32? Not sure. Any recommendations?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
It was done with a snare by @Hollywood Jim. See this post:
More proof that I never had an original idea in my life lol
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
I remember more than a decade ago seeing this double drummer band called slaughter row in a local club. His small ludwig kit was lined with a thin sheet of tin. His bass drum was simply louder. It wasn't night and day but noticeable. Blindfolded I may not have noticed the sound difference?. I had always thought of trying it myself. Kenny Arronoff had a kit vibrated as well. It was the thing for awhile. One of the best sounding kits I've heard was Gary Peterson's small Tempus kits opening for Vanhalen..unbelievable.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member

Rock Salad

Junior Member
It probably would have to be pretty tight to the shell. I remember a Sounds Like a Drum (think it was them,) where they lined drums with foil as a muffling technique
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
It was done with a snare by @Hollywood Jim. See this post:

I was going to comment on this thread, but I guess I don't need to. Oh wait, I just did..................... Thanks beet !!


100_0376sm.jpg
 

ToneT

Well-known member
Premier had their Resonator (shell within a shell) design. Two separate wood shells.
I wonder what lining the inside of a wood shelled snare drum with some aluminum flashing cut to size would do.
I tried this once on a Supraphonic using thin carpeting and that drum was DEAD !
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
If I were you, Larry, I would consider buying some cheap beater kit and doing it to THAT kit. Personally, I would be overly worried about nicking the inside of the shells with the edges/corners of the metal sheeting. Plus, I think that the difference between the natural interior and sheet metal interior would be much more pronounced if the shell were made of a softer wood.

I HAVE taken a basswood drum set (one of those cheap Sound Percussion kits) and spread polyurethane on the inside. It had the effect of making the drum set sound brighter, and it projected better--pretty much the same idea as using a hard wood that's harder and less porous. That was an eye-opening experiment.
 

J-W

Well-known member
Particularly in the bass drum, I would think that it would emphasize the "basketball pingy" effect due to the smooth/reflective interior, and would kill any resonance coming from the shell due to the added weight and dampening from the rubber backed sheeting. Neither of which is a benefit to my sound. YMMV.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
I think I'll take a beater kit, spray the inside with Flex Seal, then silver glitter paint and call it my "Silver Sealer".
What's the worst that could happen other than a cease and disisst letter? :LOL:
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
If I were you, Larry, I would consider buying some cheap beater kit and doing it to THAT kit. Personally, I would be overly worried about nicking the inside of the shells with the edges/corners of the metal sheeting. Plus, I think that the difference between the natural interior and sheet metal interior would be much more pronounced if the shell were made of a softer wood.

I HAVE taken a basswood drum set (one of those cheap Sound Percussion kits) and spread polyurethane on the inside. It had the effect of making the drum set sound brighter, and it projected better--pretty much the same idea as using a hard wood that's harder and less porous. That was an eye-opening experiment.

Good call. I'm really done with buying drums though. I spent enough already.

I do have a Sonor Players kit that would make a better candidate than the DW's

It would just be an experiment. I'm pretty sure I can do this without nicking anything.

I brush lacquered the insides of a Yamaha Gigmaster kit once, and I felt it definitely improved the crispness of the drums.

Thanks for the idea to use a different set.

Also it's great seeing you around here brother.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
Just chiming back in - I based my prior comment on having played one of those fiberglass-lined Pearl kits, and also one of the straight fiberglass kits. Do the lined ones sound different than the regular wood shells? Yes. Do they sound like the pure fiberglass shell? Not really.

I suspect you'll find something similar with the metal lining.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I'm hearing you. The inner part of the shell contributes a lot to the tone. Which in this case would be wood. I'm guessing the attack qualities and the reflections/afterglow would be affected noticeably. Which is most of it for me, assuming it plays out like I am guessing. Just to see what would happen. I have high hopes.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
I'm hearing you. The inner part of the shell contributes a lot to the tone. Which in this case would be wood. I'm guessing the attack qualities and the reflections/afterglow would be affected noticeably. Which is most of it for me, assuming it plays out like I am guessing. Just to see what would happen. I have high hopes.

Try it. You'll like it.

.
 
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