Another alternative for a drum riser...

cdrums21

Gold Member
Have you guys ever seen a portable blow up bed from places like Cebalas and other outdoor camping stores? The reason I say this is they have bed frames that fold up like an accordion and pack up into a travel bag. Super light weight aluminum and supports 500 lbs. I used one for a riser for a long time, I just put sections of plywood on top of it and gaff taped them together so they wouldn't separate. Worked perfectly and the frame folded up into a bag I could hold in my hands. It weighs about 15 lbs. Here's a picture to show you what I mean. I never had any trouble with it at all, my platform area was 6' x 8' and I think the area for the mattress was 4' x 6'. It's 18" high. It cost $100 plus plywood sheets.....smooth as a gravy sandwhich!

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cdrums21

Gold Member
That's a lot more than I want to carry to a gig. I can set up same level as my band no problem. The less I carry the better lol
I hear ya brother. Personally, I always like to be up on a riser if possible. The kit and stage look better that way IMO. The mattress platform is small and lightweight when folded up, about 1' x 2' in a carrying bag. Weighs about as much as a snare drum in a case...if that. Then 6 - 2 x 4 sections of thin plywood placed on top and gaffed together and you're golden. Easiest drum riser I ever used or had to haul and set up.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
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bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Load support is one thing, but what about stability? With the arm movement and torso twisting a drummer does, it could make for a shaky ride and also loosen-up the joints of the frame.

Bermuda
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I use a riser system in 4 sections that link very securely together (simple grub screw clamps & retaining grooves). Similar to the Intellistage system, but with lighter composite boards. The weight / bulk is in the boards, but the support structure collapses to almost nothing. The boards are an easy stack up in the truck, or lie comfortably in the load floor of my car. The whole thing is super stable, and surprisingly tolerant of modestly uneven surfaces. The whole cost me about $400 as a B stock item.


Drums + riser setup.jpg
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
I use a riser system in 4 sections that link very securely together (simple grub screw clamps & retaining grooves). Similar to the Intellistage system, but with lighter composite boards. The weight / bulk is in the boards, but the support structure collapses to almost nothing. The boards are an easy stack up in the truck, or lie comfortably in the load floor of my car. The whole thing is super stable, and surprisingly tolerant of modestly uneven surfaces. The whole cost me about $400 as a B stock item.


View attachment 90064
What brand?
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
What brand?
It was a UK retailer own (re)brand, so I don't know the original manufacturer. Boards are part ply, part composite, aluminium profile edged. Each 1M (3' 3") square board weighs 14lb. The whole riser weighs in at 72lb. It's absolutely rock solid, & no sub boom issues either :)
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Load support is one thing, but what about stability? With the arm movement and torso twisting a drummer does, it could make for a shaky ride and also loosen-up the joints of the frame.
I've played on a few of these portables at festivals where they had a backline set up. Bermuda is spot on about how untrustworthy I felt about it while playing on one of them. Like how Neil Peart's drums and cymbals move a lot as there are no legs on his stands, the "riser" would wobble like that.
Not all of them mind you, but this one did.

Not sure if my playing was affected, but it was on my mind for the 45 minutes.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
Your platform was wider than the support frame by 1' all the way around?

Although it pains me to suggest anything at all from Walmart, but, there's this: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-18-High-Profile-Foldable-Steel-Bed-Frame/969518289?selected=true

View attachment 90057
I love this as an option. I've been trying to come up with a riser solution. The key is ease of transportation, and how long to set up and tear down. If I add significant time to either end of the set up or tear down, my bandmates will not be happy. So I've been looking at various options, home brew idea, etc. This has me thinking...thanks. ( I just wish there was a 12" high option, rather than 18"...still, a fine alternative. *** edit*** I just looked, and the same company offers a 14" version)

The frame that the original poster shows is also a cool idea, tho like everyone else, I'm wondering about its stability.
 
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cdrums21

Gold Member
Load support is one thing, but what about stability? With the arm movement and torso twisting a drummer does, it could make for a shaky ride and also loosen-up the joints of the frame.

Bermuda
I was incredibly stable on my riser, our singer would even jump up on it with me during the show. Zero problems with stability. I wouldn't have used it had their been any issues like that.
 
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cdrums21

Gold Member
I use a riser system in 4 sections that link very securely together (simple grub screw clamps & retaining grooves). Similar to the Intellistage system, but with lighter composite boards. The weight / bulk is in the boards, but the support structure collapses to almost nothing. The boards are an easy stack up in the truck, or lie comfortably in the load floor of my car. The whole thing is super stable, and surprisingly tolerant of modestly uneven surfaces. The whole cost me about $400 as a B stock item.


View attachment 90064
That's very similar to what the original picture I posted is. They are as stable as a riser on milk crates or dry wall buckets, look better and are easier to transport. I would not hesitate to recommend or play on one.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
I hate playing on the floor and having my eye level at my bandmates belt buckles, so those bed frame options look great! Thanks for the suggestions, guys.
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
I love this as an option. I've been trying to come up with a riser solution. The key is ease of transportation, and how long to set up and tear down. If I add significant time to either end of the set up or tear down, my bandmates will not be happy. So I've been looking at various options, home brew idea, etc. This has me thinking...thanks. ( I just wish there was a 12" high option, rather than 18"...still, a fine alternative. *** edit*** I just looked, and the same company offers a 14" version)

The frame that the original poster shows is also a cool idea, tho like everyone else, I'm wondering about its stability.
No stability issues at all! :)
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
Your platform was wider than the support frame by 1' all the way around?

Although it pains me to suggest anything at all from Walmart, but, there's this: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-18-High-Profile-Foldable-Steel-Bed-Frame/969518289?selected=true

View attachment 90057
Yes, my platform hung over the edge of the portable riser by about 1'. But on that section of wood going around the outside of the platform, there was nothing really bearing any weight. I probably could've gotten away with 7' x 6', but the extra 6" helped in cymbal stand foot placement. It wasn't an issue whatsoever.
 
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cdrums21

Gold Member
One more thing...like one poster stated, it is surprisingly adaptable to modestly uneven floors. Because the legs are in a configuration that allows them to be folded up, they aren't rigidly fixed and the minimal movement of each leg helps the overall platform to conform to an uneven surface when weight is added to the top, but still remains stable. I wish I had thought of or seen this when I was looking for a drum riser instead of carrying heavy plywood boards and drywall buckets that got stuck together around with me.
 
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