And The "Winner" Is . . . .

gdmoore28

Gold Member
I stopped off at Guitar Center today on the way home from my doctor's appointment and, as usual, headed directly to the cymbal room after grabbing a wood-tipped stick. As luck would have it, all the new ride cymbals were mounted down low under other cymbals, and all the labels were turned inward so that I couldn't see what I was playing. The only thing I knew about them was the manufacturer - due to their grouping in the room. They had Zildjian, Paiste, Sabian, and Meinl.

So, I went thru the room playing each ride cymbal (and a few large crash cymbals that I mistook for rides) repeatedly until I narrowed them down to those that I liked.

In the end, this is what I ended up with:

*Winner: Sabian 21" Raw Bell Dry Ride in any of its incarnations - AA, HH, AAX. It just didn't matter. The RBDR came out on top by a wide margin. It has exactly the right amount of ping, wash, crashabiliity, and bell for my tastes. The 21" RBDR is simply a killer cymbal that will have to one day end up in my cymbal case.

*Second Place: The 21" Zildjian K Sweet Ride. It reminded me of the Sabian RBDR with a dose of moderation in all the points I love about the Sabian. It exhibited a nice bell tone, wash, and ping. If there was no such thing as the RBDR, this is the ride cymbal I would have purchased.

*Third Place: The 20" Zildjian K Ride. Yep, this particular regular old K Ride really sang. It was narrowly edged down by the K Sweet.

*Runners Up: 21" Zildjian A Sweet Ride; Sabian Omni Ride; 20" Meinl Byzance Traditional Medium Ride; and several other Zildjian K and K Customs that performed very well. I could be happy with any of the cymbals I've listed, but the RBDR is the king of the pile when it comes to whetting my cymbal tastes.

(My sincere apologies to Paiste fans. I have no prejudices against the brand. To me,they sound wonderful on recordings and in live performances, but, behind the kit, I just can't warm up to them.)

What do I play now? A late 1990s 20" Sabian HH Medium Ride with rivets. This little Sabian has led the selection of dozens of ride cymbals I've owned over 50 years of playing the drums. It simply sings on recordings and live performances alike, and it brings a smile to my face when sitting on the drum throne. Eventually, a RBDR will replace it on my kit, but the Sabian won't be sold. We've had too many good times together to loose this friend now~!

GeeDeeEmm
 

newoldie

Silver Member
Have you ever tried the Sabian AA Bash Ride? They say it's a lighter version of the RBDR.


I recently bought one for an instrumental group and love it's ping, wash, and it's crashability. Not overpowering but it can cut through without losing control, and the crashability is pretty easy, whether single accents or multiple crashes.
 

calan

Silver Member
Have you ever tried the Sabian AA Bash Ride? They say it's a lighter version of the RBDR.


I recently bought one for an instrumental group and love it's ping, wash, and it's crashability. Not overpowering but it can cut through without losing control, and the crashability is pretty easy, whether single accents or multiple crashes.
As a current owner of an HHX RBDR (and an AAX RBDR formerly) and a 21" Bash Ride, I don't see much similarity. Sure, they're both 21 inches in diameter and made from the same alloy at the same factory, but I don't know why Sabian would even use that in the description since they behave so differently.

I like both for different reasons and situations but I wouldn't call them analogous at all.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
I don't see much similarity.

The store didn't have a Bash Ride in stock this time, but I've played one in the past compared to a RBDR. I agree - I didn't hear any similarity or shared characteristics. The RBDR was far more my taste.

GeeDeeEmm
 

newoldie

Silver Member
As a current owner of an HHX RBDR (and an AAX RBDR formerly) and a 21" Bash Ride, I don't see much similarity. Sure, they're both 21 inches in diameter and made from the same alloy at the same factory, but I don't know why Sabian would even use that in the description since they behave so differently.

I like both for different reasons and situations but I wouldn't call them analogous at all.
Just my opinion, but after trying both cymbals I'd have to agree with Sabian's own web site, which calls the AA Bash Ride "a Crash-Ride edition of our Raw Bell Dry Ride – but bigger and lighter!"
 
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