Amp for a Roland TD-27KV.

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Hi I’m thinking of getting an amp for my Roland TD-27KV kit. I normally use headphones for practice but I may need an amp as part of a setup to record performances for a Rockschool exam which I guess would cover both video and audio. It’s a bit of a shame that I need to buy one as I think they’re expensive generally speaking and it seems quite overkill to need to buy an amp just for potentially one exam. If the virus situation improves and gets to a point where Rockschool exam candidates can go to a test centre in person to take their exam, the video exam system may come to an end. I did look into if I could hire a good amp locally but I’m not completely sure about that and if there is somewhere that could help me with that at present. I may need to look into it more but I don’t live in a city or even a very large town where there could be more possibilities for this pre-virus let alone now.

I’ve seen some Roland V-Drums amps but I guess there are other good makes and I would be looking to get a reasonably good one. I wouldn’t go too cheap but I don’t want to go completely overkill either - I’m probably going to be forced to do that to at least some degree.

I’m also going to have to record the performance for audio and video but is something I haven’t looked into yet. There is some stuff recommended on the Rockschool site regarding this but not everything and the advice on the Rockschool site is necessarily the best or even a good option but I will have to check it out and consider what I see on there in terms of this and as part of any research. I know straight modern mobile phones are probably reasonably good for perhaps recording a performance as they are a lot better than they were and quite a high standard generally speaking regarding this. Again I’d have to see for myself and see if it’s good enough for Rockschool.

Any advice regarding any of the above would be genuinely and greatly appreciated.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
For amplification, I would recommend a full range speaker/amplifier with sufficient headroon. There are purpose-built amps like the Roland, Keyboard amps, Bass amps like the Rumble 500, etc. My own personal recommendation would be to grab a Yamaha Powered Monitor like the DBR10/12/15 since it will fill other roles in your musical musings and should last you a decade or two.

EDIT: As someone just pointed out below, It does appear that a phone interface might be a better option than amplification given the specifics of your circumstance.
 
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charliedrummer

Senior Member
Rather than buying an amplifier, would something along the lines of an iRig interface meet your needs by recording audio and video directly to your phone?
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
It's not something I've heard of but could be something depending on how I need to record my performance which is again something I'll need to look into perhaps starting with the Rockschool site.

In terms of possible options if I did need an amp I could go for either the Roland PM-100 / 200 drum monitors but I could keep more options open perhaps by going for the Roland PM-200. It's expensive stuff but that's not exactly new for good stuff hopefully these days and especially electronic drumming.

Thank you both for your help and advice.
 
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Mr_Runner

Well-known member
I've been advised that possibly the Roland Go Mixer may be the way to go in terms of what I'm trying to achieve.
 

Flam_5

New member
Hey Mr_Runner,

I'm sorry to veer off topic, but do you like the TD-27KV overall? I'm trying to decide between this one and the TD 17-KVX (cheaper but much smaller pads).

Any thoughts you have are appreciated.

Thanks
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
No worries. I like the TD-27KV overall and it's a really cool kit to play but it should be at the price. It was my second kit. It looks much more like an acoustic, the 14" digital snare is really cool, the 18" digital ride is also pretty cool and the 10" toms are also cool. The mesh pads are also cool. It's much more enjoyable to play than my first kit and you wouldn't think so but it can effect your playing and how you play. The look can also do this and again you wouldn't think so. The feel of the kit can as well which is perhaps a bit more understandable.

The only thing at the moment seems to be that I seem to have to press harder on the hi-hat pedal in order to get a crisper / tighter sound from the hi-hat. I was actually going to do a post on it actually. It could be to do with the hi-hat sensor and I don't know if a more robust stand would sort it (see below).

I also had spinning hi-hat trouble which wouldn't possibly effect an acoustic one as much due to no wires. My first hi-hat stand a Mapex Tornado H200 wasn't I don't think basically robust enough to take the VH-10 hi-hat and therefore spun more. I got a Mapex Tornado H400 which was a little bit more expensive and robust and seems to have improved the spinning hi-hats quite a lot. It still happens a little bit and it'd be interesting to see if an even more robust hi-hat stand would completely solve it and again a post I was thinking about doing. It all could be at least partly to do with the diameter of the hi-hat stand rods. The solution of screwing and therefore tightening a loose hi-hat stand rod didn't seem to apply here at all with any stand.

I think the hi-hat stuff above is basically at least partly the result of electric hi-hat pads not being specifically designed for acoustic hi-hat stands, not even a Roland one apparently. I wanted an acoustic stand and was advised by electrodrummer that they were only really for the acoustic look and didn't actually work quite as well as the ironically cheaper it seems hi-hat pedal with a wire - they seem to be on the less expensive kits with the acoustic hi-hat stands being on the more expensive kits it seems and generally speaking from what I've seen. electrodrummer seems to be correct with this but usually in life a person has to see for themselves if they don't know despite receiving good and correct advice like in this case.

My original plan was to go for the TD 17-KVX. On paper it was looking good. However when it came to physically trying out the kit things were different and this can be common in life. I found it to be exactly the reason why you need to try out a kit. I basically couldn't go for the TD 17-KVX due to the ride cymbal it had and more specifically the bell on it. I found the bell to be too small and also to get the bell sound seemed to require even more accuracy. For me that was no good and even tougher if you're trying to read music and spending less time with your eyes on the cymbal. For the price the TD 17-KVX should have had a much better ride cymbal in this respect but that seems to be Roland unfortunately. It was quite disappointing for me but only due to one of my main needs and requirements. There was even one bird at a shop that I went to who was trying to persuade me that a smaller bell on a particular ride cymbal on a particular kit would improve my accuracy and be a 'challenge'. Not a good idea for an exam which isn't going to be easy and with a strict examiner. I wasn't buying other things she was saying and didn't buy anything off them and I thought the kit was crap anyway on several fronts and especially for the price even if it was widely known and apparently good quality stuff. It was perhaps an intermediate kit as well. It's why you need to do enough research from several sources that doesn't always include sales people and also trying out kits. Yeah the people in the shop want to sell and I understand that but by adding what probably came down to bs could cause a shop more problems later on when the customer isn't reasonably happy. I think a good shop should give good and reasonably honest advice so the buyer will hopefully get the best product for them. They may even get a very good sale for doing so with less problems later on and may also gain repeat business instead of none.

However the TD 17-KVX apart from the above seemed an ok kit. It may have similar hi-hat problems to the TD-27KV as well though that I've written about above. What heavily swayed me and the main reason for me to go for the TD-27KV was the heavily improved ride being much larger but again more specifically with a much larger bell and a larger response area. Still it isn't as good as my acoustic Sabian Pro Sonix ride in that respect! At the moment it doesn't seem to matter how much you spend on an electric kit - it still doesn't seem to be able to replace an acoustic kit at least hardware wise. The future may see more improvements though but electric kits have been around awhile now. The TD-27KV should have been perfect for the price but again shows very few things are no matter how high the price is.

I didn't want to spend anywhere near the amount that I did for my main needs and requirements to be met. However I did a lot of research from several sources as I needed to get it as right as I could as I essentially only had one chance to do so. Going back to the shop stuff from above I also had a guy on the phone at one particular shop trying to persuade me that I didn't need to try out a kit before considering to purchase despite me explaining to him why I needed to try out the kit as part of my main needs and requirements hardware wise. He also wanted a deposit there and then over the phone and that the apparent deal on their website was due to 'end soon' but he would do it if I paid the deposit there and then. Like everything else you get good people and not so good people. My TD-27KV would I think be a lot better than the kit I was enquiring about even if it was a lot more expensive. At a shop like that and especially what I've learnt about it since I wouldn't trust a shop like that with more than £5. It's all experience though and hopefully headed me to a much better situation and kit even if you did get ripped off. I may have done in my younger days but that guy and others like him are essentially decades behind in that respect.

So I got the TD-27KV with 3 years warranty and 2 years interest free from PMT. The toms are also a lot better than the TD 17-KVX. The TD-27KV could have had a kick drum like on the models above it but the one on it is ok at least for myself at present. That is Roland being Roland again. Not only that but I bet they put the ride that you get on the TD 17-KVX to get you to go for the TD-27KV. They probably aren't stupid and are probably pretty good at what they do. However I couldn't try out many other kits out at least in the cities around me even if they did have a ride cymbal similar to the TD-27KV which they probably didn't anyway from what I saw and researched. PMT had a good selection of Roland that you could try out but no Yamahas. I found one or two Yamahas but not the intermediate - higher end ones which may have suited some of my main needs which actually I don't think they did, even the highest end one with respects to the ride cymbal main need that I had. A few other places had a few Rolands to try but that was about it. I hear in some places in the USA there can be 20 kits that you can try and probably a range of makes as well. One thing I heard about the TD 17-KVX was also that the rack although designed to be more compact I think apparently has a bar on it that can interfere with the kick drum placement I think. As I remember not being able to place the kick drum centrally because of the bar?

I have had some very good and helpful advice from here but I also got some good advice from '65 Drums' on Youtube. The guy Justin seems a reasonably cool, helpful and genuinely honest guy which is some of what you need I think when choosing to buy something and especially something that involves more money. He's done a lot of videos covering a lot of different things electric drumming related. He's also reviewed a lot of hardware as well and a good bit of what he says I think does display a good element of practical truth at least in my opinion. I didn't necessarily agree with everything he said but enough I think to make him a good source. You will probably find more than several videos from him regarding some of the stuff you're interested in (including the TD 17-KVX upgrade stuff you were enquiring about on your other post and the rack bar kick drum stuff just above I think) and some of your circumstances at present. Again it can take time and energy but should be worth it overall.

I'm not sure if a 'completely perfect' kit exists out there even if you spent 1000s. Mine should have been for what I paid! and it just goes to show.

Anyway I'm sorry about all of this - I'm just trying to help out as I received a lot of good and helpful advice from here and was one good place to start.
 
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Flam_5

New member
Hi Mr_Runner,

I wrote another response on a different thread, but a few thoughts on what you wrote here:

I'm surprised to hear that the Roland hi hat stand isn't built for electric hi hats. That really surprises me! However, we'll see how things go when I get everything set up in a few days. I decided to buy a Yamaha hi hat stand to use with the 27KV. The price was right, and I generally trust Yamaha hardware (along with others like Pearl, DW, etc.) so let's hope it works out okay.

I like what you wrote about the cymbals. That was another aspect that tipped the scales for me toward the more expensive 27KV. I don't think I'll ever expect an electric cymbal to sound as good as an acoustic one, but the fact that I couldn't buy the larger ride cymbal that comes with the 27KV and place it on the 17-KVX was another reason to go with the more expensive one. If I had gone with the 17 KVX, I don't think I wouldn't lost a whole lot of sleep over the cymbals though; I think my primary concern would have been the toms, which are able to be upgraded. But right now I'm blessed with the cash for the 27 KV so I went that route and will thus have the larger ride cymbal with a better functioning bell from the start.

I'm stoked to get the kit, and your review here has got me even more excited. Thanks again!
 

Mr_Runner

Well-known member
Yeah I heard about the Roland hi-hat stand from someone, can't recall 100% who. I don't think many if any are at present. According to the 27 KV instructions / manual the hi-hat rod diameter needs to be 6mm or above I think as I remember. Like I was saying before my Mapex Tornado H400 improved my spinning hi-hat prob (over the Mapex Tornado H200) but I don't think the hi-hat stand rod is quite 6mm on the H400. That could be something for the future but the spinning hi-hat prob does seem to get worse when opening / closing it and also playing it open. I have moved onto a track that requires a good bit of that so I may need to address that once again and possibly in the near future if I need to. I guess that could explore the 6mm stuff.

The ride on the 27 KV is not compatible with the 17 KVX and even if it was it'd cost a fortune anyway and possibly not worth the upgrade and going straight for the 27 KV. My reason for going for the 27 KV is at least partly similar to yours it seems. Not only that but I don't know of any other kits that have a ride like on the 27 KV let alone one you can try out. That included Yamaha as well I think. I think the toms on the 27 KV are a lot better than on the 17 KVX but I think you are more interested in that than I am whereas it's kind of the other way around with the ride although I do appreciate that that seems to be important to you.

In terms of an electric cymbal not sounding as good as an acoustic one that wasn't what I completely meant. Like I was saying before I was really talking about the bell area and response - it is better on my acoustic but that cymbal does have a reasonably large bell area on it and perhaps too much to expect that another cymbal let alone an electric one having near enough the same bell area. I think the one on the 27 KV is about the best I'm going to get from what I've seen so far.

I read recently that the sound from the Roland kits can sound very processed and fake as it uses modelling but that isn't my own personal experience of it. I think it sounds pretty good and especially compared to a Yamaha kit I tried. Justin from 65 drums I think was saying that although Yamaha used real drum sounds, apparently they over engineered them to the point that they ironically didn't sound very realistic. That definitely rang a bell when I tried out an intermediate Yamaha and could be partly the reason why apparently more Yamaha drummers may use additional software concerning sound according to 65 drums. They may get even better sound than Roland though via this route but could come down to use, opinion and personal preference again.
 
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