Am I too old to start drumming?

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Drumming should be a sport
It's definitely very physical, which is what makes it that more fun. And I tend to lose weight whenever I get into a religious practice regimen for several months on end. Lately I've been taking a bicycle ride after practice as a cool down effect. Otherwise I stay up late at night and wake up unrested or late the next day.
 

J-W

Well-known member
All sports are games for children. The fact portions of society idolize men that play children's games is frightening and it's sad they get paid 10s of millions of dollars when our teachers, firefighters, and police all need second jobs to make ends meet. The world's priorities are so skewed it's a wonder we're all even still here.

My sentiments exactly.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
How about Golf? it has to be one of the most boring "sports" ever. I guess it doesn't fall into the category of defenseless...
I like to hit the ball. I'm not interested in chasing it all over the course. I play Tiger Woods on XBOX 360. My daughter is interested in learning how to play so we watch it on tv. That's about where I'm at with golf.
 

Frank

Gold Member
You have little to nothing to lose, and a whole new world and life to gain.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
I like to hit the ball. I'm not interested in chasing it all over the course. I play Tiger Woods on XBOX 360. My daughter is interested in learning how to play so we watch it on tv. That's about where I'm at with golf.
If she is really interested in playing, like drums, lessons are important to avoid bad habits that will plague you forever. Second, watch women's golf because they hit the ball distances the average golfer can achieve and as a result they have course management skills you'll never see from the men. I encourage all amateur golfers to watch the LPGA over the PGA.
Side note: having worked many tournaments you see on TV, some of the guys are cool, a lot aren't. The LPGA events all had less ego and were generally more fun to work.
 

SomeBadDrummer

Well-known member
According to the PBA, yes it is.
Curling is yet another of many Scottish sports that are clearly based on a dare. "I bet you can't slide that rock all the way across the moor!"
"I bet you can't get this wee ball in that wee hole wayyy down there using only this stick!"
"I bet you can't lift this log by the end and throw it!"
etc, etc
I love the Scots, and in fact I am partly Scottish (and Irish American Indian and African) which explains my rhythm and appendages:sneaky:(y)
I also take the stairs
 
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single-ply

Senior Member
I’m 44 and have always wanted to learn drums but life and family got in the way! Now my kids are a bit older and have more time to myself, my thoughts have turned to the drum kit again. But I’m really nervous about taking the leap, especially as it involves a bit of investment, and my main worry is coordinating all four limbs! I know it will be more challenging than learning as a kid. Any advice about taking that first step and ways to learn limb independence?

Also, any tips about finding a teacher? What should I be asking/looking for?

Thanks!
A better question is "Am I too smart to start Drumming?"

LOL. Nah. Do whatever makes life fun!
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
If she is really interested in playing, like drums, lessons are important to avoid bad habits that will plague you forever. Second, watch women's golf because they hit the ball distances the average golfer can achieve and as a result they have course management skills you'll never see from the men. I encourage all amateur golfers to watch the LPGA over the PGA.
Side note: having worked many tournaments you see on TV, some of the guys are cool, a lot aren't. The LPGA events all had less ego and were generally more fun to work.
Plus Paige Spinarack? plays there I believe something to keep the attention span for longer than 10 sec..( I don't have that problem).
 

armen

Member
I’m 44 and have always wanted to learn drums but life and family got in the way! Now my kids are a bit older and have more time to myself, my thoughts have turned to the drum kit again. But I’m really nervous about taking the leap, especially as it involves a bit of investment, and my main worry is coordinating all four limbs! I know it will be more challenging than learning as a kid. Any advice about taking that first step and ways to learn limb independence?

Also, any tips about finding a teacher? What should I be asking/looking for?

Thanks!


never too late to learn good things, luckily you can learn basic drumming stuff without having the real drum kit, and luckily this time, you can find all kind of information (teacher, tricks, tips, & others) in your finger tips.
 

toddy

Platinum Member
I don't think you are ever too late in life to take up a new hobby. if you want to do it professionally then that is a different conversation entirely. everything you need to learn is available online through services like drumeo etc and you can download any music that has ever been produced.
I have had less than 100 drum lessons in my life and am quite comfortable with my technique. i would definitely recommend finding the best teacher available in your area and asking for a lesson on how to hold the sticks though.
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
I would only ask for a lesson on how to hold the sticks if that is your very first lesson and you have never before played drums. I say this because I naturally found the way to hold the sticks that was the most comfortable to me, also by the time I took my first and only lesson I had been playing drums for over 9 years so I knew very well what worked and didn't for me. (I mentioned before how when I started playing I tried to emulate Tommy Lee's exaggerated moves because it looked cool, I then went to play in a band that required lots of speed so economy of movement was necessary so I developed my own technique and that has served me well to this day). The point is when I went to take the lesson I didn't tell the guy that I had been playing for years, I let him teach me as if I didn't know a thing, and the first thing he said was that my grip was wrong, then proceeded to have me do the Jazz grip (Which I can play with and I can play fast parts but it's way too uncomfortable and feels odd to me). I took the lesson, didn't complain, paid the guy and thanked him but I never went back. (after I looked at every single drummer that I was trying to emulate, and every single one was using my original grip).... So if this is the very first lesson, then yes by all means ask for recommendations on how to hold the sticks, but do say something if that doesn't work for you. there is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to holding the sticks, hitting the bass drum setting up your kit or practicing X technique that will make EVERYONE better, some things will work for you some others won't so if you are paying someone to teach you then say something when things are not working.
 

toddy

Platinum Member
I would only ask for a lesson on how to hold the sticks if that is your very first lesson and you have never before played drums.

true, i started playing snare drum in a marching band age 7 and have had a kit at home now for over 20 years now. my last lesson was in 2010 with Pat Petrillo and i will not study again with a teacher until I go to university in London next year. i too wouldn't worry too much about how you hold the sticks, but i definitely wouldn't want to see someone develop carpal tunnel etc due to very poor technique. like i said almost everything anyone could ever need to learn can be accessed via youtube, dvd and books anyway.
 

Alburg

Member
Hi Kitty,
I hope you did start to learn. I started about a year ago and will soon be 61. One of the best decisions I ever made. Not only thoroughly enjoyable but some unexpected health benefits as well. If you have an interest in drums don't delay, you won't regret it.
 

pocket player

Junior Member
I’m 44 and have always wanted to learn drums but life and family got in the way! Now my kids are a bit older and have more time to myself, my thoughts have turned to the drum kit again. But I’m really nervous about taking the leap, especially as it involves a bit of investment, and my main worry is coordinating all four limbs! I know it will be more challenging than learning as a kid. Any advice about taking that first step and ways to learn limb independence?

Also, any tips about finding a teacher? What should I be asking/looking for?

Thanks!
Through your heart over the bar ,and the body will follow, just do it !! I am 66 and playing better,and learning more now than i ever had in my 20's. good luck !
 

JDFaulky

Well-known member
I didn't start drumming until I was 35. Now I'm playing with other bands and loving it.

Never too late. Also, definitely get a teacher if you can. I was self taught for a couple of years until I got a teacher and didn't realize how much poor technique I had until I got a really good one. A great drum teacher is invaluable.
 
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