Am I too old to start drumming?

Kitty44a

New member
I’m 44 and have always wanted to learn drums but life and family got in the way! Now my kids are a bit older and have more time to myself, my thoughts have turned to the drum kit again. But I’m really nervous about taking the leap, especially as it involves a bit of investment, and my main worry is coordinating all four limbs! I know it will be more challenging than learning as a kid. Any advice about taking that first step and ways to learn limb independence?

Also, any tips about finding a teacher? What should I be asking/looking for?

Thanks!
 
I see that you live in London, so there should be plenty of good teachers - I'm sure someone can recommend an excellent teacher there.
That's where I would start before getting equipment - you'll probably enjoy it though and look for a set soon after. :) Luckily, you can get a very nice set of old Premier drums in the UK for cheap. If you don't stick with it, just sell them for the same price later.
There's also the option to just get a practice pad and a pair of sticks for now to work on technique. If you're into Jazz, maybe also a set of brushes and a pad like the Sabian Quiet Tone. It may seem a bit boring but lots of players started out like that.
You can look at some grooves and play them slowly just with your hands on a table and feet on the floor to get an idea of the coordination. Stick and pedal technique is not exactly the same but it's a start. One of the earliest hurdles is typically playing the right hand by itself and then the right foot by itself. All of this will take a while but you can definitely still start and become a good drummer.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Never too young or too old to learn a musical instrument. It’s healthy. You can look for a used kit or even new starter kits aren’t that costly now. You may inspire one of your kids to take up drums or another instrument so a positive influence too.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I'm an advocate of training your hands before you take on the broader task of establishing four-way independence. Sticks and a pad are the best tools for beginners in my opinion. Find an instructor who can introduce you to proper technique. Once you've built a rudimental foundation, moving on to a set of drums will be a lost less daunting.
 

vtran711

Well-known member
I got back into it just over a year ago when I turned 50. Go for it! Just have fun and don't over think it. If your heart is in it and your family is supportive (helpful as drums can be noisy) there's nothing to standing in your way. I'm lucky that I found a group of musicians right at the beginning which makes it 1000X more enjoyable. Some don't mind playing music in isolation but for me it's been incredible being able to share this experience with others. Don't be afraid to get out there and jam with others. Good luck!
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Look you’ve already joined a drum forum. So officially you’re a drummer- we have beginners to pros. So it’s sort of said and done ANd if you change your mind. There is a big costly fine-snd the beheading of your drum kit heads- a ghastly event poor drums. So it’s pretty cool being a drummer isn’t it? ROFL welcome to the forum. Drummers are more fun.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
Kitty44a...at 44 I'd be considering the art of quilt making....Are you serious!...44!..do you still get carded when purchasing alcahol?. Get going!..find a cheap kit at a pawn shop...flea market?..ebay used gear?. Hop on YouTube for some guidance. I had zero guidance and just toughed it out learning what I could from local hero's at outdoor festivals etc. Ask lots of questions on the forum here..there are some mighty knowledgeable people here and guidance is their middle name.
 

Kitty44a

New member
Thanks guys! Basically I have visions of myself drumming along to Foo Fighters and Green Day and then realise that I can’t make my feet listen to my hands, so have a loooong journey ahead of me ? Keep telling my kids to try new things and now have to put my money where my mouth is and do the same. It’s good to hear how other people have started later on.
 

Kitty44a

New member
Kitty44a...at 44 I'd be considering the art of quilt making....Are you serious!...44!..do you still get carded when purchasing alcahol?. Get going!..find a cheap kit at a pawn shop...flea market?..ebay used gear?. Hop on YouTube for some guidance. I had zero guidance and just toughed it out learning what I could from local hero's at outdoor festivals etc. Ask lots of questions on the forum here..there are some mighty knowledgeable people here and guidance is their middle name.
? I know it sounds daft but everyone was telling me how much harder it is the older you get. Have been a mum for so long it feels a bit scary to start something new (and realise you’re very uncoordinated ?).
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
If you're wanting to perform in front of people, 44 is not a lot of room to phuck around. What kind of music are you wanting to play? What do you listen to? Are you already a pots and pans player? Do you tap your feet at the bus stop, or feel the rhythm against the left turn signal?

I'm not against rubber/pad practice, but it can be very boring to some people. Many of us were in our early teens when we were forced into that regimen. We had nothing else to do. An adult on the other hand, has years of listening experience. And you don't just go through 44 yrs without grabbing a pair of sticks from the local music store or a friend and beat around on stuff. If that's you, then the brute force approach may be the route to go. On the other hand, if you've been listening to a lot of music, and especially if you like a lot of styles, you might get a lot out of joining a country or blues band to start. "Song Song Blue" is a great feeling shuffle that would strengthen the closed grip of your hihat hand, eg.

How much time do you have weekly to dedicate to this? And it's probably a good time to remind ourselves that playing a gig won't be happening any time soon while the pandemic is still raging. In which case, maybe pad practice is the way to go.

I think the adult student needs an approach that's balanced more toward performing. Then integrate the finesse of technique later.
 
Last edited:

Doraemon

Well-known member
It's no use comparing yourself to kids, there are many advantages of age, like experience, attitude, focus, having your own money and hopefully confidence to do what you want.. Also I think drumming is a lot more than just acrobatics with limbs. The best would be to take a few trial lessons, but that may be more difficult these days. It may be useful to have an idea of what you'd like to achieve, like drumming along to Foo Fighters, and ask how to get there. Often teachers have a website or some videos where you can find out a little more about them. Don't worry about leaving if one is not a good fit, there should be lots of options in a big city. There is also this thead: Find a Drum Teacher Here
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
No better time to learn the drums than the present. By all means go for it!
Once you check drums off your To-Do List move on to getting a Harley-Davidson for street cred!
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
Well hopefully by then I’ll be a pro ?
I hope that Norwegian tu
? I know it sounds daft but everyone was telling me how much harder it is the older you get. Have been a mum for so long it feels a bit scary to start something new (and realise you’re very uncoordinated ?).
Hey! Hey! Hey!..dont heed the words of those the older you are the harder it is gang. Just have some fun! And befor you know it your purchasing your first ludwig black beauty for studio work. Life is short so get on that horse and ride!
 
Top