Am I a bad drummer?

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
There's nothing wrong with being your own harshest critic. It a trait of motivated, successful people. You're probably better than you think, but stay hungry. It's what gives you the edge.
Right on. I need to give myself an edge because I have so many other things working against me.
 

boomstick

Silver Member
I first saw the light about practicing rudiments at a drum clinic featuring Roy Burns. He told a story about a guy who had an upcoming gig, and wanted Roy to teach him some stuff. The guy said he didn't need to learn rudiments or anything, he just wanted Roy to show him how to do some cool beats. Roy then demonstrated a tasty beat by doing paradiddles between the hats and snare and accenting certain notes, with a simple kick pattern underlying it. A-ha, now I get it, I thought to myself. That said, I have only practiced 3 rudiments with great regularity: Singles, doubles, and paradiddles, I just practice each one for long periods of time during practice sessions. I feel like you can get a ton of mileage from just those three. I'll also echo what somebody said earlier about practicing rudiments to music. I like to practice them to electronic music since it usually involves precise tempos. Here's a good article that Roy wrote on the subject:

Rudiments: For or Against?
https://www.moderndrummer.com/article/july-1981-concepts-rudiments-for-or-against/
 

mrfingers

Senior Member
Work on one or two at a time, and don't run it into the ground at one sitting.
They have to be built up over time until they become an automatic reflex.
Also, for me, some are more useful than others.
Yep, once you start thinking about using a rudiment in music I think you mess up more easily than when it is really learned and automatic. But do play them practicing (on your kit) to music to see how they fit or if they're useful at all. Ex.: 8 single strokes vs a paradiddle vs 8 doubles...and which hand to start and which is best to end with? And should you start that rudiment on the "1" or the "and" of 1 or on "2", etc., because the rudiment dictates it?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I’ve been “beating” around drums since I was 8 and yet in 55 years I’m mediocre at best and seem to be getting suckier than improve- it’s a “Beall” curve. I continue to believe my best was my first 10-15 years but those were some great experiences- wild times and I was a wild man.
I disagree that you're a mediocre player Art. Personally, I like your playing. Over or under inflation of skills....best avoided. Downing...or overinflating oneself...to oneself....not good. It's all about the feeling, not the tech stuff.
 

Alex Sanguinetti

Silver Member
To be a bad (or a good drummer) you have to PROVE IT, practicing rudiments, bla, bla, bla, etc. don´t make you necesarely one.

Post A VIDEO and we can tell you...

Best regards and good luck in your music journey.


Alex Sanguinetti
 
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GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
“I disagree that you're a mediocre player Art. Personally, I like your playing. Over or under inflation of skills....best avoided. Downing...or overinflating oneself...to oneself....not good. It's all about the feeling, not the tech stuff.” Thanks Larry I appreciate the compliment (coming from you) and support. Seasons greetings and blessings to you and yours my friend. How timely your appearance- the Spirit of Christmas himself with your giving nature. Did I miss the third installment of your UK trip??
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
I struggle with the exact same thing. My drumming is an offshoot of my background in wind instruments and bass guitar in high school band, and so while I was aware of the rudiments, I wasn't interested in them so much as learning to play the songs on the radio. It's only recently that I rediscovered sticking and rudiments as tools in drumming. I'm still not practicing them as much as I should, but it's that awareness that you still have room to grow that drives you forward, keeps you from stagnating, and makes you a better player.
 

Brian

Gold Member
To be a bad (or a good drummer) you have to PROVE IT, practicing rudiments, bla, bla, bla, etc. don´t make you necesarely one.

Post A VIDEO and we can tell you...

Best regards and good luck in your music journey.


Alex Sanguinetti
This, exactly.

But the reality is, does it matter what others think? If you want to excel, you have to go above and beyond. Discipline, practice, playing with others...it's not something I was ever really good at, until "now" that I am old. :D Plus when I show videos of myself and etc, I'm really sensitive and shy...it's almost painful to post things, because of that feeling that someone watching can blow my doors off and will have something critical to say. I get that aspect, too.

IF you are improving and having fun, the self-image aspect should not be a big deal
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
This, exactly.

But the reality is, does it matter what others think? If you want to excel, you have to go above and beyond. Discipline, practice, playing with others...it's not something I was ever really good at, until "now" that I am old. :D Plus when I show videos of myself and etc, I'm really sensitive and shy...it's almost painful to post things, because of that feeling that someone watching can blow my doors off and will have something critical to say. I get that aspect, too.

IF you are improving and having fun, the self-image aspect should not be a big deal
Us old guys didn’t grow up with selfie sticks and YT, so not as easy to just post something. It really should be a site of more sharing and positive criticisms, but it generally tunrns into a ton of views, a bunch of thumbs down and generally no input at all. I want to agree and say it doesn’t matter what others think, but when we play in front of others, be it an audition, gig or otherwise, we all know it does.

It’s generally easier to get along with players who know they can improve though.
 

newoldie

Silver Member
I first saw the light about practicing rudiments at a drum clinic featuring Roy Burns. He told a story about a guy who had an upcoming gig, and wanted Roy to teach him some stuff. The guy said he didn't need to learn rudiments or anything, he just wanted Roy to show him how to do some cool beats. Roy then demonstrated a tasty beat by doing paradiddles between the hats and snare and accenting certain notes, with a simple kick pattern underlying it. A-ha, now I get it, I thought to myself. That said, I have only practiced 3 rudiments with great regularity: Singles, doubles, and paradiddles, I just practice each one for long periods of time during practice sessions. I feel like you can get a ton of mileage from just those three. I'll also echo what somebody said earlier about practicing rudiments to music. I like to practice them to electronic music since it usually involves precise tempos. Here's a good article that Roy wrote on the subject:

Rudiments: For or Against?
https://www.moderndrummer.com/article/july-1981-concepts-rudiments-for-or-against/
Loved the article and Roy's take on rudiments. I find that practicing rudiments increases the strength of my stick technique, and that always sees to translate into more fluidity on the snare and drum kit, and that makes my performing feel even more solid.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
This, exactly.

But the reality is, does it matter what others think? If you want to excel, you have to go above and beyond. Discipline, practice, playing with others...it's not something I was ever really good at, until "now" that I am old. :D Plus when I show videos of myself and etc, I'm really sensitive and shy...it's almost painful to post things, because of that feeling that someone watching can blow my doors off and will have something critical to say. I get that aspect, too.

IF you are improving and having fun, the self-image aspect should not be a big deal
I’m a little bit shy. I have posted a few videos , but without a camera on myself. I’m mainly saying that from a technical aspect it is not so easy for me because of logistics and technical shortcomings.

Btw, do you guys think this is a good book to learn from?

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1YC2dXSz3w_bM6eejanpJV9AsOJOEsLry/view?usp=sharing
 
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boomstick

Silver Member
Loved the article and Roy's take on rudiments. I find that practicing rudiments increases the strength of my stick technique, and that always sees to translate into more fluidity on the snare and drum kit, and that makes my performing feel even more solid.
Glad you liked the article. Yeah, Roy Burns is a wealth of information, and he always explains things really well.
 

boomstick

Silver Member
I’m a little bit shy. I have posted a few videos , but without a camera on myself.
I'm a bit camera shy too, so I do over-the-shoulder shots with the camera mounted behind me and a bit to the left. That way the camera isn't staring you in the face and the viewer can really see what you're doing.
 
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