Am I a bad drummer?

KamaK

Platinum Member
Take Bill's (awesome) online course; get a teacher; get Great Hands For a Lifetime. Do all three if possible.

Indeed... I took Bill's invaluable course. To me, it was more about fixing my hands (early in my education) than it was about learning to play drums. It was a prerequisite to being able to work with my private teacher though.
 
Cool resolution, go for it! ;). I found using Great Hands for a Lifetime helped me with not letting go of rudiments. I strayed from rudiments for a while, but I gave this DVD a shot and use the warm up routines daily now. It may be a fun way to incorporate rudiments into your own routine; I think the warm ups are no more than ten minutes. So, even if you’re short on time you can work out on a pad, then chip away on the stuff that you want more work on after your warm up. You warm up your chops, and kind of keep the rudiments in your head.
 

BruceW

Senior Member
Reading this was like looking in a mirror... and it made me see things I didn't want to see.

With the exception of a paradiddle, which I still suck at, I know no other rudiments. What would be a fun way to learn them?
Me as well....though perhaps I gig a little more frequently than the original poster, usually averaging 3-6 a month. I have band rehearsals once or twice a week, but don't really practice on my own much unless there is new material to learn before said rehearsal. And I know that I should....confession is good for the soul, right? :)

I'll be checking out the suggestions for more fun ways to try and learn some of the rudiments. Good thread.
 

V-Four

Senior Member
Let me start off by saying after years of playing I don't break sticks, not for the most part. I don't get pains and blisters. I don't dent heads, but I've broken a couple bass drum heads with my beater. I don't crack cymbals (knock on wood). I can play most of the classic rock you hear on the radio.

I've never been through rudiment training. I know a few that I've taught myself, but I hardly spend any time practicing rudiments on one of my two pads that I own, even though there is ample opportunity for me to do so. I only practice 3 hrs. once a week on my drum set for the most part. I might get a few minutes in during the week. Once in awhile I'll play a gig.

I've never done rudiments in fact. Not until I joined this forum and read how other people approach drums and drumming. I've always been a drummer in my mind, and I've played with some really talented individuals, but I don't practice near enough. I would if conditions were optimal, but they're not. My rudiments, the few I know, are not blazing fast. I don't think my fills suffer too much though, but I could use some more control over my doubles and work those in too for some extra flair and variety around the kit.

So I've been reading some responses to other peoples questions in here and I've decided that I am, in fact, a lazy drummer and I need to learn rudiments using a program and doing a progress journal to document my development. This will be my New Year's Resolution in addition to the other stuff I've mentioned. I want to feel like a real drummer and a real drummer knows his rudiments, dammit.
I don't really have anything to offer, but I will say that the above quote looks like I wrote it myself, main difference being that I only have 1 practice pad, not 2. Keep at it and good luck. :)


T.
 

Out Of Warranty

Senior Member
......I don't really have anything to offer, but I will say that the above quote looks like I wrote it myself........
+1 There seems to be a lot of this going on....

For you, at this point in time, it's rudiments. For me, it's a zillion other things.

It helps to journal.

I'm a "list" person. I write shit down, then get a felling of accomplishment when I start checking things off.

BTW - I wish you would reconsider bailing out of the forum.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
No parking on the dance floor.

Progress or perish...have a great time at it...and great decision!
 

mikel

Platinum Member
Drumming is a different journey for every drummer. There is no right or wrong way to be "You" as a drummer. Personality and how you like to learn comes into it. Anyone who says you must or even should do A B C D etc is simply telling you what worked for and suited them, it could suite you fine but just as easily bore you rigid or put you off developing at all. Do what suits your personality and the way you like to learn.

Its drumming, you are supposed to enjoy it. For me anything that turns it into a chore is avoided, because I learn and play better when I am having a good time.
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..Not until I joined this forum and read how other people approach drums and drumming..

..I've been reading some responses to other peoples questions in here and I've decided that..


I think is important to realise that on forums like this (or forums in general..) people can easily give the impression of being experts, while in fact they are not..

There are people with 1000's of posts whos playing, to say the least, is just not very impressive, but they write as if they are a legend themselves..

Thats why i think you should never think or assume that you are a bad drummer just because of the posts you read on forums like this..

However, to practice more is never a bad idea, for anyone..
 

Out Of Warranty

Senior Member
There are people with 1000's of posts whos playing, to say the least, is just not very impressive, but they write as if they are a legend themselves..
Excellent point.....

...to that I would add though, over time, you learn who's contributions to the group has real value.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I think is important to realise that on forums like this (or forums in general..) people can easily give the impression of being experts, while in fact they are not..
There are people with 1000's of posts whos playing, to say the least, is just not very impressive, but they write as if they are a legend themselves..
Thats why i think you should never think or assume that you are a bad drummer just because of the posts you read on forums like this..

However, to practice more is never a bad idea, for anyone..
Wow.... 2nd post on this forum and some of the most sage words I've read on here for months. Welcome !
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
People are better at different things.

It's not usually good or bad, its how many hours spent practicing. The more you play the better you will be. Playing with my band isn't practice. Working on things I need to improve at is. This is often mistaken and guys treat practice as an excuse to go jam out. It all helps, but a practice routine with focus makes a huge difference.

I was a "lazy" drummer you could say and skipped rudiments for years. I could get by. My time was good, my single strokes were very fast so I could play most stuff. I never understood why I couldn't solo, and was lacking some groove, and really cool chops. Once I started working an hour a day on rudiments it was life changing for me.

A tip. Don't go learn 40 rudiments as you won't use 3/4 of them.

Doubles, paradiddles, double paradiddles, paradiddlediddles, flams, inverted doubles are a good place to start. I use every one of those almost every time I play. Set a metronome and log the bpms. make sure you can do it clean for a long period of time.. Speed isn't the focus, clean and say 5 minutes straight.. once you can do it, go up a bpm or 2... before you know it you will be very happy you did.
 

Groov-E

Silver Member
How about a good hockey analogy to start of your day ?

You don't get in shape playing hockey, you need to get in shape to play hockey.

I see jam sessions, recording and band practice as hockey games.

Beyondbetrayal's great advice about flams, diddles, inverted doubles, to me are the gym.

Diddles get me around the kit more easily with more dynamics, flams add spice to fills, inverted doubles and double paradiddles enhance my grooves and doubles add modulations and help build or release tension for example.

I find it is good to know you are capable of going half a period without taking a break, while in practice chances are each presence on the ice will be under a minute before the next line change.

A car analogy would be this : you know you can push the engine all the way to 6000rpm, making the regular ride at 2500-3000 smooth as Steve Jordan's grooves.

It is a question of motivation, discipline, time and priorities. I wish I could do more, and also feel like a slacker when I ease off practice for a while.
 

cerendrad

Member
I find it boring to practice without music. When I was very young I practiced rudiments on the drum set while listening to music.

I put a list of rudiments in front of me. I put on my favorite radio station. The first song was played all the way through using the first rudiment.
I started the rudiment on the snare drum. Then I moved around the drum kit still playing only that one rudiment for the whole song.
I also played along with both feet, bass drum and hi hat.
Second song was played using only the second rudiment. And so on until I went through the whole list of rudiments.
As you might guess sometimes I got a very strange combination of rudiment and song.

This routine helped me learn to utilize the rudiments in my playing and in my solos.
Practice this for a while and then when you go to do a fill, all of a sudden like Magic the rudiments will become part of your fill!
Try it, you'll like it.


.
That's a great idea to make it more fun. A long time ago, for practice, I started playing along to a local university radio station. Each night there was a different genre of music to play to (Thursday's Caribbean music was a surprise joy to play to for a metalish drummer), but I've never thought to play exercises to anything other than a click. And like the original poster it is no fun so I don't do it as much as I think I should. I'll try that from now on.

Thanks!
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Fitting for this topic: A small story by drum-educator Stephen Taylor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z46rorxmHls
I do suck! Oh well!

Last night I started with some paradiddles and the 5 stroke rolls, then I introduced a new one to myself, the drag paradiddle. I'll work on them for awhile. I spent about 20 minutes doing exercises, but I'm going to bump up my minutes next time. I'm set-up where I can watch videos too while I work on the pad, so that's nice. I also want to spend some time with my Jojo Meyer's Secret Weapons CD as part of my routine. So I think between the VF 40 rudiments webpage, the Jojo CD & my trusty copy of Stick Control, I can develop a good routine that I can do for an hour or so, M-W-F every week. It's like doing arms at the gym, only it's pad work.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Well I think it more healthy to think you’re bad than to believe you are good. It’s like if you “think” you know everything it demonstrates you know nothing because you cease to continue to learn-grasshopper lol. I don’t think anyone seeks to suck, and though we can work really hard not to anyone can- it happens. I have a great knack of it. Which is great and makes the journey always a challenge. I’ve been “beating” around drums since I was 8 and yet in 55 years I’m mediocre at best and seem to be getting suckier than improve- it’s a “Beall” curve. I continue to believe my best was my first 10-15 years but those were some great experiences- wild times and I was a wild man. I did rudiments for a few years in the beginning but really only started back the last few years. Watching Tony Williams play doubles ad infinitum inspired me to start back- so I play continuous transitions of singles,doubles, triplets, single and double paradiddles-the goal seamless , fluid, even, smooth and at various tempos. Really waking up my hands.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Well I think it more healthy to think you’re bad than to believe you are good. It’s like if you “think” you know everything it demonstrates you know nothing because you cease to continue to learn-grasshopper lol. I don’t think anyone seeks to suck, and though we can work really hard not to anyone can- it happens. I have a great knack of it. Which is great and makes the journey always a challenge. I’ve been “beating” around drums since I was 8 and yet in 55 years I’m mediocre at best and seem to be getting suckier than improve- it’s a “Beall” curve. I continue to believe my best was my first 10-15 years but those were some great experiences- wild times and I was a wild man. I did rudiments for a few years in the beginning but really only started back the last few years. Watching Tony Williams play doubles ad infinitum inspired me to start back- so I play continuous transitions of singles,doubles, triplets, single and double paradiddles-the goal seamless , fluid, even, smooth and at various tempos. Really waking up my hands.
I hear ya. I feel like I've played mediocre drums for 30 years and I'm just starting to get "good" at it the last five years, but I want to get better. That's my motivation. I know it sounds corny, but I know I can be better, and the only way is to work at it. All, or most of my drum practice thus far has been playing a drum set, playing songs, but I've been neglecting other things and it's becoming apparent to me now, and I need to fix it.
 

Out Of Warranty

Senior Member
I hear ya. I feel like I've played mediocre drums for 30 years and I'm just starting to get "good" at it the last five years, but I want to get better. That's my motivation. I know it sounds corny, but I know I can be better, and the only way is to work at it. All, or most of my drum practice thus far has been playing a drum set, playing songs, but I've been neglecting other things and it's becoming apparent to me now, and I need to fix it.
There's nothing wrong with being your own harshest critic. It a trait of motivated, successful people. You're probably better than you think, but stay hungry. It's what gives you the edge.
 
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