All You Really Need Kits..

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
The thing is that the drums can be the most impressive of all instruments on stage and it can get absurd sometimes.
The choice of what to bring says a lot about the drummer. To me anyway, and I quickly dismiss any drummer that has a lot of cymbals and drums and quirky things. I pay attention to the minimalistic drummers and want to learn. It's the snare that matters anyway, the rest is fluff, except the ride. And for drummers starting out...get a good round throne.
It's the pulse that speaks to me most in drumming - so bass drum is no.1.
Next, I love the way bass and snare work together, so I'd still be a happy drummer if I only had a right leg and a left hand. Seriously.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
80% of drumming greatness is accomplished with snare, kick, hats, and ride. IMHO

Which makes Hal Blaine’s monster Blaemire concert tom kits kind of funny. Cool as heck to the drumming community, but not super-crucial to the larger history of our recorded music history.

I still love my Jenkins-Martin toms, though. LOL All 8 of them.
Hal occupies that special place in history. His idea of single-headed toms actually started out with him using two timbales instead of regular toms. Then when he was getting these cool tones nobody else was getting, the people he worked for thought it would be cool if there were more notes, and even Hal thought it would be cool to have a whole mess of those things, and that idea changed modern drumming forever, right? But I argue his kit was pretty crucial to the history of recorded music, since, as was already said, he played on most of it coming out of L.A.

In fact, depending on how you look at it, he messed up alot of guys who were also working. Jeff Porcaro spoke of a time when he had to carry both double-headed toms and single-headed toms because you never knew what the producer folks wanted. It kinda started that thing where guys working the LA studios had cartage people and a truck to haul stuff from session to session, which you could do in LA. In New York it was different due to the public transportation and the space: they still ran around with maybe a trap case and cymbals and would use what the studio had. LA had parking spaces ;)
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Hal occupies that special place in history. His idea of single-headed toms actually started out with him using two timbales instead of regular toms. Then when he was getting these cool tones nobody else was getting, the people he worked for thought it would be cool if there were more notes, and even Hal thought it would be cool to have a whole mess of those things, and that idea changed modern drumming forever, right? But I argue his kit was pretty crucial to the history of recorded music, since, as was already said, he played on most of it coming out of L.A.

In fact, depending on how you look at it, he messed up alot of guys who were also working. Jeff Porcaro spoke of a time when he had to carry both double-headed toms and single-headed toms because you never knew what the producer folks wanted. It kinda started that thing where guys working the LA studios had cartage people and a truck to haul stuff from session to session, which you could do in LA. In New York it was different due to the public transportation and the space: they still ran around with maybe a trap case and cymbals and would use what the studio had. LA had parking spaces ;)
I had no idea how that monster kit got it’s start. Although I will add this info to the story I tell to literally everyone who asks me about my Jenkins-Martin kit
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I had no idea how that monster kit got it’s start. Although I will add this info to the story I tell to literally everyone who asks me about my Jenkins-Martin kit
It's true as far as I know. I read it in an early Hal interview a long time ago. And I guess the story is Al Blaemire was working with Bob Yeager at the Professional Drum Shop and I guess over a few beers, Hal was talking about having a bunch of toms so Al jumped on board to build them out of fiberglass. Mendozart knows better but I'm sure Jenkins-Martin bought the rights from Blaemire to make the fiberglass drums. Hal's kit was cool with the four higher toms on one rolling rack stand, and the three bigger ones on another rolling rack stand, and they would just roll the toms in around his 4-piece blue sparkle Ludwig kit, and lock the wheels so the toms wouldn't go anywhere.

But yeah, depending on how you look at it, you can either praise or blame Hal for the monstrosity kits that became prevalent throughout the 70s. Every major drum manufacturer had to offer some kind of "octaplus" kit, and the shame of it was that you didn't have the unlimited adjustability you have now, so ergonomics just weren't part of the game back then. I think Rogers was the only one with proper hardware to position everything where you wanted it when they came out with the Memriloc stuff, and even that stuff compared to what you can get today is pretty primitive. But I hear Craig Krampf (Rogers endorser through the late 70s-80s) is still playing his big Rogers kit they gave him in '78!
 
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