All you guys with limited access to a kit

Netz Ausg

Silver Member
I've got a 9 - 5, a family and a small house - as you can imagine this doesn't lend itself to having a rehersal space and the spare time to practice anywhere near as much as I would like to!

I do set up the kit and play with a band once a week for 3 - 4 hours, but the music we play isn't the kind that gives me the chance to open up and apply what you might call 'chops'. It's good practice in so far as laying back and keeeping time/groove but not an oppotunity to progress.

I don't have a pad, instead i use a silencer pad on a snare drum for stick technique practice but there's so much more to life than doubles and diddles - I miss jumping on the set and rocking along with the likes of Danny Carey and Gavin Harrison on my iPod! At University I would get 2 hours 5 times a week on the set to play, and now I'm literally drip feeding myself!

So, my question is this: How do you guys with limited access/time/space get your groove moving and fit in practice, play and jams at home?
 

mxo721

Senior Member
I feel your pain, my situation isn't as bad as yours but I still work a lot of hours. basically my rule is: don't play what I already know, do something new every time I sit down, I come home from work and have maybe 30-40 minutes max, so I just go crazy. practice pads just don't appeal to me, because all my weakness is in my feet, I really like the whole kit.
 
I can only use a practice pad.


I've been trying to play rudiments heel down.

Now I try to practice the bug swat technique used by grind drummers as well.
Which is playing with your feet like they were running,little ankle movement and I try that with Gung ho by Anthrax and see how far I can feel the burn lol.

Got that tip from Derek Roddy's website.

Too many techniques out there lol.

My problem is I don't know what music I want to play.

A jazz grindcore band perhaps!

Complete with tron and hammnond and RHODES!!
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I use my practice pad when I can't get down to the kit for a meaningful practice.

The key to using a pad effectively is to work from a book, as it's all too easy to keep practicing what you're already good at. A stuck book routine forces you to practice things you might not think of, and translates well when you get back to the kit.
 

Netz Ausg

Silver Member
I use my practice pad when I can't get down to the kit for a meaningful practice.

The key to using a pad effectively is to work from a book, as it's all too easy to keep practicing what you're already good at. A stuck book routine forces you to practice things you might not think of, and translates well when you get back to the kit.
Any reccomendations that won't break the bank? With Christmas coming up it's a good opportunity for getting a book!

Background if it's useful - played for 10 years, not taught (a few lessons but nothing of worth), can play paradiddles and some variations there of (thanks to youtube) but actually developed some double/buzz technique on the fly by imitating my heroes. I can play a solid beat but the now irregular nature of practice means my time keeping is not as perfect as it might once have been. Also my stamina and speed have been affected (no longer comfortably playing some of the Lamb of God tunes I previously was, for example).

I really need a learning resource that will help me with new stuff and getting back to where I was.

Also feedback on practice regularity and time spent doing it. I know some pro drummers spent 6+ hours a day on pads and kits and have no illusion that I can do that - but what do other drummers with day jobs and home life get into their schedule?
 

Netz Ausg

Silver Member
I feel your pain, my situation isn't as bad as yours but I still work a lot of hours. basically my rule is: don't play what I already know, do something new every time I sit down, I come home from work and have maybe 30-40 minutes max, so I just go crazy. practice pads just don't appeal to me, because all my weakness is in my feet, I really like the whole kit.
I know what you mean. That was how I was cramming in practice year before last - getting 30 mins on the kit at my parents house a few times a week. Fun, sure (thought not enough time to warm up!) but not good for progress.

I need some pedal pads for practicing my footwork - shame it all costs £££!
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Many people use practice pad kits or e-kits. I prefer the pads because of the disconnect in e-kits between the stroke you play and the sound.

It's a more crowded world and that's less friendly for drummers.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Any reccomendations that won't break the bank? With Christmas coming up it's a good opportunity for getting a book!

Background if it's useful - played for 10 years, not taught (a few lessons but nothing of worth), can play paradiddles and some variations there of (thanks to youtube) but actually developed some double/buzz technique on the fly by imitating my heroes. I can play a solid beat but the now irregular nature of practice means my time keeping is not as perfect as it might once have been. Also my stamina and speed have been affected (no longer comfortably playing some of the Lamb of God tunes I previously was, for example).

I really need a learning resource that will help me with new stuff and getting back to where I was.

Also feedback on practice regularity and time spent doing it. I know some pro drummers spent 6+ hours a day on pads and kits and have no illusion that I can do that - but what do other drummers with day jobs and home life get into their schedule?
Everyone will say "Stick Control" is the book to buy, and for a lot of folks, it is. I prefer something like "Funky Primer". It has a good set of pure sticking exercises at the front, and if played as the book suggests as 16th's at 120 bpm, I really believe it's a challenge for even seasoned players. I myself made a copy of the sticking stuff to keep with my practice pad. The section containing fast 16th's to 32nd's in double-stroke format is my current study. I guess I just lack time and focus to do the big snare books. You could also look for marching snare instruction books, those have good stuff for pad practice of course, too.

From there the funky primer book gets into more musical things. Next up is bass drum independence exercises, then snare independence, and so forth. It's a good approach to broadening your drum horizons... At less than 10 bucks, I think it should be in anyone's budget.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0739006630/ref=rdr_ext_tmb

There's the amazon link... It even lets you peek at the instruction pages, though the meat of the book is blocked.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member

achdumeingute

Senior Member
Well...I have a similar situation with outside factors.

I got a low end roland td3 e-kit for $400. Perfectly fine for practicing things like groove and time. It takes up maybe 3-4 square feet...i usually play anywhere from 10pm to 1am with no complaints from fam sleeping upstairs.

In your case, I think this would be worth a look. I think it's good for people with acou experience to get some practice time in. You can develop coordination and time on this. However for someone that hasn't/doesn't play acoustic much I think it's a little development stunting...as the 2 are very different in feel.
 

iamjohn

Senior Member
You just said it, and I still don't believe it. I don't see how that's profitable.
I should mention that this rate is only weekdays before 4pm but that's not a problem for me. After 4pm and on weekends they charge $15/hr. Still a deal and a half IMO.
 

Bertram

Silver Member
IF it's possible then make a deal - and try to get atleast 30 minutes of intensive playing on a kit. Everyone says pad! - but you said it yourself, you want to practice the KIT. build up some chops.

I myself is a kid in a 5 person family - and by the time i get home from school, my dad is already home from work and sleeping - due to some major injuries in his bac kand shoulders, he cannot handle a full day of work, nor just staying awake...
- my point is -
I've one hour of practice every day. So I practice intensively, and sometimes, i don't practice at all. So try to figure out some spaces where you can maybe get about 30 mins of playing. If that means it'll only going to be 2 times a week - then it's still better than nothing.

Or, do as said "downunder" and rent a room with gear. Btw? are there any drumshops near you? - You dont have to go to a drumshop - to buy anything :) LOL. Play the damn things!
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I should mention that this rate is only weekdays before 4pm but that's not a problem for me. After 4pm and on weekends they charge $15/hr. Still a deal and a half IMO.
That makes more sense, and I agree, still a hell of a deal. Most spots here are more like 30-40 an hour.
 

kettles

Gold Member
Any reccomendations that won't break the bank? With Christmas coming up it's a good opportunity for getting a book!
I've heard good things about "Mastering the Tables of Time" by David Stanoch. Haven't actually had a chance to have a look inside it yet. Going to order a copy sometime soon.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0739064371/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=1278548962&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B002S4O15Q&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0FPV5BAAD6CP1T5VKKV8
 
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