Age old question: How to prevent the kick drum/hi hat from sliding away

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Bring a drum rug. BUT, if you forget yours, go grab one from the front door of the venue. There's almost always one there. Yup, it'll be gross, but you won't care during the gig. After the gig, take it out side and bang it out really good (clean it for the venue as a "thank you") and put it back. When you take off your nasty shirt at the end of the day, you'll be reminded to go get a drum rug for yourself.

I've used those KBrakes, and they work well on carpet (as do normal spurs). They don't work well with really light kick drums, and they don't work well on rubber surfaces (like on an actual riser), and I don't know about hardwoods.
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
I bring a rug every time, I’ve got a thick one and a light one. Mainly for floor protection and sound. All drums aren’t created equal in term of sliding, light bass drum without mount can be tricky, and a nightmare even with a rug.
My heavy bass drum with its two toms won’t move even without a rug and just with the rubber tip of the Spurs. On the contrary, I played a light Yamaha kit (birch custom I think) , the bass drum would literally jump forward even with the spikes in the carpet.
 
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Erberderber

Senior Member
Get a Pearl 'Crash Mat' and you'll never worry about creep again. It has a wooden block attached that goes in front of the bass drum. I've used it on stone paving and slippery parquet recently. Nothing budged.
 

J-W

Well-known member
I've used those KBrakes, and they work well on carpet (as do normal spurs). They don't work well with really light kick drums, and they don't work well on rubber surfaces (like on an actual riser), and I don't know about hardwoods.

Do you have the optional rubber pads intended for hard surfaces? Just curious.
Again, I have no affiliation with them whatsoever. My bass drums don't even have spurs, so I can't even try them.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Do you have the optional rubber pads intended for hard surfaces? Just curious.
Again, I have no affiliation with them whatsoever. My bass drums don't even have spurs, so I can't even try them.

Yes, they have the optional rubber pads. These are drums at the church, and they sit on a riser that has a rubber surface (they should have done carpet, but they never listen to my advice. Ever.). The rubber feet slip on the rubber surface. They ended up screwing the feet to the riser. Once again, not the best decision, but whatever. What do I know?
 

J-W

Well-known member
Yes, they have the optional rubber pads. These are drums at the church, and they sit on a riser that has a rubber surface (they should have done carpet, but they never listen to my advice. Ever.). The rubber feet slip on the rubber surface. They ended up screwing the feet to the riser. Once again, not the best decision, but whatever. What do I know?

Hmmm........rubber feet on a rubber surface is something Kbrakes probably didn't even consider. I'm not sure what would even work for that, besides the sharp metal spikes, if that.
I had indoor outdoor carpet on my riser for a short period but the stick fragments got to be too difficult to vacuum out of it. I play a lot of rimshots and make sticks last longer than I should, so it tends to look like a woodworking shop below my snare. I switched to the hard rubber tiles intended for garage floors, but I can tell that a bass drum would slide pretty easily on it. Fortunately mine don't make any contact with it whatsoever, and it's super easy to clean.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
Hmmm........rubber feet on a rubber surface is something Kbrakes probably didn't even consider. I'm not sure what would even work for that, besides the sharp metal spikes, if that.

They should have just kept the original spurs, but once again, their listening skills aren't the best.

I had indoor outdoor carpet on my riser for a short period but the stick fragments got to be too difficult to vacuum out of it. I play a lot of rimshots and make sticks last longer than I should, so it tends to look like a woodworking shop below my snare. I switched to the hard rubber tiles intended for garage floors, but I can tell that a bass drum would slide pretty easily on it. Fortunately mine don't make any contact with it whatsoever, and it's super easy to clean.

Yup, I get sawdust all over my carpet, metronome, Roland SPD-SX, and Mackie when I play. It's just part of the job. I never even think to clean anything because it all stays on the trailer right now.
 

Drummer Calvin

Junior Member
Bring a drum rug. BUT, if you forget yours, go grab one from the front door of the venue. There's almost always one there. Yup, it'll be gross, but you won't care during the gig. After the gig, take it out side and bang it out really good (clean it for the venue as a "thank you") and put it back. When you take off your nasty shirt at the end of the day, you'll be reminded to go get a drum rug for yourself.

I've used those KBrakes, and they work well on carpet (as do normal spurs). They don't work well with really light kick drums, and they don't work well on rubber surfaces (like on an actual riser), and I don't know about hardwoods.
I did take front door mat or kitchen mat which was very filthy, whatever worked but there must be away for drummer to stop kick drum sliding without carpet.
 

moxman

Silver Member
Never happens to me - the protective mat in my station wagon makes a perfect drum rug. It’s semi rubber on one side and tough woven finer on the other. It’s always there if I need it.
The rubbery underside is not sticky - so I can still slide the whole kit around if I have to with a bit of a pull. But it prevents the spikes from digging into the floor.
I salvaged it from my old Volvo XC70 wagon before I got rid of it.. and still use it to this day in my current wagon. I think the Volvo designer must have been a drummer!
 
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Jml

Senior Member
I started using a Kaces Drum Rug now that I only use one bassdrum, before that it was mostly used on an e-kit I had earlier. It's pretty lightweight (maybe a bit too thin for some, but it holds everything in place), easily foldable, and with a built-in bass drum stopper. Doesn't take up much space at all in the car, so I bring it with me to every gig from now on.
View attachment 106858
The Zildjian rug has the stopper too. That’s what I use.
 

SharkSandwich

Junior Member
I have a rug that serves two purposes very well.

1. It keeps my stands and bass drum from sliding.
2. I mark it with tape so I know where to place my stands, reducing setup time.

rug.jpg
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
I have a rug that serves two purposes very well.

1. It keeps my stands and bass drum from sliding.
2. I mark it with tape so I know where to place my stands, reducing setup time.

View attachment 107117


To anyone playing gigs on a regular basis on their own drum set, once you use this tape-marked system you will never go back. It's a game changer.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Play barefoot and grab the hi hat chain between big toe and next-just try it. I can move my hats around so further or closer holding the chain (you'll develop callouses that help) and you get exquisite control of hats. It sounds Simian and it probably is.
 

Cmdr. Ross

Silver Member
YouTuber RdavidR just did a video about this very thing. He showed the best product for the kick ever made.
 
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