Advice on which studio kit to buy - please help me spend my money.

That ain't no lie. And since the reflections of the lower frequencies take more physical space to develop, plus no diffusion in untreated music shops, that makes for a very uneven comparison, all around.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Also played a Recording Custom kit and a Gretsch Renown kit, both w/ 24" kicks. Still cogitating; I felt that the recording custom was very focused, and the renown was more open? Maybe just my ears, but that's how they felt. Both super nice, both very responsive.
When you play and listen to kits, pay attention to things like hoop and bearing cut. You will find that a 30-deg sounds different than a 45-deg, which will sound different from a round-over.

After a while, you will find that kits with similar attributes bear a familial resemblance to each other, and begin to develop/understand what your preferences are.
 
When you play and listen to kits, pay attention to things like hoop and bearing cut. You will find that a 30-deg sounds different than a 45-deg, which will sound different from a round-over.

After a while, you will find that kits with similar attributes bear a familial resemblance to each other, and begin to develop/understand what your preferences are.
Ah, word. Appreciated. I've always paid attention to hoop design, but only enough to know which ones will chew up my sticks more, and I don't think I've ever paid attention to the bearing cut on the shells other than as another line in the marketing copy. This is good, I'm learning a bunch o' stuff.
 

markdrumz

Junior Member
Consider Ludwig Signet 105 in the 20/12/14 sizes. They are available for under $800, new. US-made maple shells. Add a 6.5x14 Acrolite and you have a nice all-around kit with $300 left over from your budget. Punches way above it's weight.
 
@markdrumz Okay, question on that. I played a Ludwig Signet kit over the weekend after the first recommendation. I felt like it hit hard, a lot harder than I expected. Funny question, but what's wrong with it? It's not dirt cheap and they're not throwing in extras, but it seems high quality for the price point.

This is probably my paranoia talking, but it seemed like a sweet product at a very approachable price, and I always feel like there must be an issue I'm overlooking when I see something like that. The kick was only a 20", but had a very classic Luddie tone, as far as I could tell over the tinnitus :D
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
I think the only thing "wrong" with them, is they don't appear anymore on the Ludwig web site. Looks like that line is discontinued .... which could be why they're priced low. So, if you get them, you probably should get all the drums you think you'll ever use, because finding add on's is gonna be problematic. Looks like they may have been replaced with the Evolution Maple. Might want to look at the Ludwig NeuSonic, also.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
@markdrumz Okay, question on that. I played a Ludwig Signet kit over the weekend after the first recommendation. I felt like it hit hard, a lot harder than I expected. Funny question, but what's wrong with it?
The Signet was an attempt at an affordable low-mass drumset. I believe Josh at INDe contributed a lot to it. These kits sound phenomenal, and compete well with other low mass kits.

What's wrong with it? Really, nothing... The finishes leave something to be desired. The lugs, while fairly durable, are irreplaceable. If you break one, you're looking at having to call a machine shop to have new ones fabricated. Lack of vendor support is another.

The upside... They're currently extremely inexpensive for the sonic quality they offer.

If you're looking at a Signet because you like the sound, look at the Ludwig Nuesonic or INDe. If you're looking at the Signet because it fits your budget, then by all means go for it. It has one of the best sonic-bang-for-buck ratios out there.

FWIW, my personal quest ended with George Way
 
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Well, being a web developer and a former hardware guy, I'm not a huge fan of propietary or irreplaceable parts. But, they do sound good, even if I can't stand the Indian Teak finish. Just kinda seems odd to me, but I liked the other finished well enuf.

I haven't heard of INDe, but they have a great product photographer. Will check em out. I was reading someone on this board who was talking about a set of George Way drums. I'll add that to the list, too.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
Well, being a web developer and a former hardware guy, I'm not a huge fan of propietary or irreplaceable parts. But, they do sound good, even if I can't stand the Indian Teak finish. Just kinda seems odd to me, but I liked the other finished well enuf.

I haven't heard of INDe, but they have a great product photographer. Will check em out. I was reading someone on this board who was talking about a set of George Way drums. I'll add that to the list, too.
I'm a little disappointed in myself for forgetting to mention Inde right off the bat. I really love the wide-open tone those drums have, and I think the thin maple shells really sound fantastic. As far as the hardware goes I've added their tom mounts to my Ludwigs and they're really well built and extremely well engineered.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Quick warning about low mass, thin shelled, drum sets....

If you have an energetic (cough) singer who thinks that it's OK to stand on top of a bass drum and jump off of it...... You're in for a disappointment.


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