A tool for sight-reading?

brentcn

Platinum Member
Please post here that adapter if and when you get the chance, thanks!

EDIT: You're still sacrificing your playing - even if it's one eighth note - to change a page. Somehow I don't think the save-the-planet gods are going to blame the musicians of the world for using a few trees to bring music to the masses.
This one.

I might still have my old one around here somewhere. It's yours if you want it.
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
A tool that randomly generates bars of music to play along to is not useful for drummers. We mostly play the same thing the entire song. In not concert band setting our music is just lead sheets with cues. Sight reading etudes and solos is sufficient.
 

Neilage

Junior Member
Check out theDrumDictionary app.

It shows "play along" drum notations for a wide variety of drum beats including rock, jazz, funk, etc.

 

thebarak

Senior Member
I can't read music. Never could. To me the staff has a different number of lines every time I look at it, and it is animated, even when it is ink on paper. A teacher once told me there were five lines, and everytime I carefully counted them I ended with a different number. Sometimes seven, sometimes four. And that was a blank page. Then it takes me up to ten seconds to determine if a note is on a line, or between two lines. So I'll never read a score. I blame my amblyopia. If I look at the world through my right eye, it's like a Fleischer cartoon.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
I recommend the Louie Bellson book modern reading text in 4/4 as another good starting place.

In there is a section on how the rhythm is played, then immediately following it is the same rhythm written another way with ties.
It gets your mind accustomed to reading in another way.
 

Alain Rieder

Silver Member
There was an app called Drum Trainer that would provide random groove patterns. There was even a Benny Greb version, but I think it doesn't exist anymore.
I don't believe random patterns would be a great help myself, but you may have a look at what my Time Manipulation drum book has to offer.
 

jotadrums

Well-known member
Check out the Chart Reading Workbook for Drummers by Bobby Gabriele. It's big band oriented and has charts and play alongs for about 9 songs, in increasing difficulty, plus tracks to work on the exercises and such.
Bobby Gabrielle, Tommy Igoe and Ted Reed's syncopation seems to be the Bible, regarding sight-reading literature....
 

Alain Rieder

Silver Member
I agree with Todd and I would recommend Steve Houghton's Studio and Big-Band Drumming.
I have studied ensemble & Big-Band with Steve at the Musicians Institute at the start of the 80s, and most of this book is basically the weekly handouts we received made into a book.
I didn't know about Bobby Gabrielle's book but I would go for Steve Houghton's book instead.
Ted Reed's Syncopation and the Bellson book are a must too.


None that I'm aware of, never seen a professional chart written like that. Try this instead. Houghton's Studio and Big Band Drumming book also gives instructions for how to interpret a standard professional chart.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
I agree with Todd and I would recommend Steve Houghton's Studio and Big-Band Drumming.
I have studied ensemble & Big-Band with Steve at the Musicians Institute at the start of the 80s, and most of this book is basically the weekly handouts we received made into a book.
I didn't know about Bobby Gabrielle's book but I would go for Steve Houghton's book instead.
Ted Reed's Syncopation and the Bellson book are a must too.
Alain, I have both books, but you should really check Bobby Gabrielle's book (he's a former student of Houghton, and a MI educator as well). Studio and Big Band Drumming is great, but it seems dated, and, at times, difficult to understand. The Chart Reading Workbook is explained VERY well. Special attention is paid to set ups and ensemble figures, and it is notated in such a way that it leaves no doubt what the reader is to play. It has a very good amount of musical content, too, both with and without drums. For learning how to function in a big band, it's really wonderful.

S&BBD seems more like a sequel, in that it gets into the tricky business of "filling in" the subdivisions when playing ensemble figures, different types of charts, singing rhythms, etc.
 

KJIB

Active member
You could try Melodics. But, it only vaguely brushes near what you're after and it's annoying because:-

(1) they don't use standard notation, they use squares but each one is at least on a line of it's own,
(2) unbelievably they do not stick to the keeping the instruments in the same order as standard notation,
(3) even worse they sometime use a different order to other practice tracks.

It does not have random tracks but it has a lot of them. There's a free version so you can have look. You can plug most MIDI drum computers into it (or pads) and it will pick up what you're playing so you can see if you're in time / ahead / late or just totally miss-hitting etc.

Yep, I know it's not exactly what the OP wanted but it might be a step towards it. If OP finds something, let me know, I'd consider trying it.
 
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