A small (or not?) damage on the edge a ride cymbal

orash

Member
Hello everyone,

new here :)

I just had the chance to buy a 24' AGOP signature ride.


I delivered myself the cymbal in the mail (I was travelling in Europe and the store could not deliver it to me... ) with a very good packing (also after researching how will be the best way to pack it, and from previous experience of cymbals that were shipped to me in the past..especially i put effort on protecting the edge.. but ya.. anything can happen...)

anyway,

The cymbal sounds amazing.
After a day playing it, I noticed a small thing on the edge (photos attached, my finger is pointing on the area sometimes when its not clear where it is or when its from the other side).

I didn't notice it on the store or when i packed it, but frankly I didn't really look... (yes.. i know i should have, but i just fell in love with the cymbal.. ).. anyway, even if it happened during the delivery nothing to do really..

so I just want to know..

should i worry about this?
how bad is it?
is there anything i should do?

I contacted AGOP to know what they think.. I'll update if/when they get back to me

Thanks
Or
 

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C.M. Jones

Well-known member
The photos don't alarm me in the least. A cast cymbal with an imperfect surface isn't terribly unusual. If it "sounds amazing," I'd play it and never look back. But if the blemish really troubles you, then by all means, address the matter with the manufacturer/retailer. I don't think the cymbal's functionality will be affected, however.

Welcome to the forum, by the way.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Especially in the 2nd photo from the right, ending in #502, it does look like the cymbal took a hit the way the edge dips down. It looks like a possible future crack site to me. This is me totally guessing, but each side has a different angle on the dip. That's going to concentrate stress right on the impact site. It's a gamble keeping it IMO. The edges of cymbals...vibrate/move a lot. I'd do an insurance claim on it, rather than take the gamble. I'm assuming it was insured for shipment. I'm not liking what I see. It's good you sent pics to Agop.

I like shipping cymbals with edge protectors. I use a length of PEX flexible plastic plumbing, cut to size, and then slit it down it's length. Then I fit it around the entire cymbal edge and tape it so it can't come off. I've shipped cymbals between two good fitting old dented drumheads taped together like a sandwich. The aluminum hoop is the protector. PEX is way tougher though.
 
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orash

Member
The photos don't alarm me in the least. A cast cymbal with an imperfect surface isn't terribly unusual. If it "sounds amazing," I'd play it and never look back. But if the blemish really troubles you, then by all means, address the matter with the manufacturer/retailer. I don't think the cymbal's functionality will be affected, however.

Welcome to the forum, by the way.
Thanks!

My only worry was if in future it can develop to something (like crack or something), and if i should keep an eye for something specific :)

Beside that... I don't care at all for any visual default or imperfections..
After all .... the Hand-hammering are the imperfections that make these cymbals sounds (and look..) so good..

Thanks again.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Thanks!

My only worry was if in future it can develop to something (like crack or something), and if i should keep an eye for something specific :)

Beside that... I don't care at all for any visual default or imperfections..
After all .... the Hand-hammering are the imperfections that make these cymbals sounds (and look..) so good..

Thanks again.
See what AGOP has to say. They might suggest an exchange, but if you really love the sound of the cymbal, getting an identical one could be a challenge. Unless the chances of a future crack are high, I'd probably just keep it.
 
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roncadillac

Member
I don't see a problem now but I do see a potential problem in the future. I do agree that it looks unintentional (errant hammer strike, someone's mishandling in store before you found it, dropped during shipping, etc) but I also agree that the nature of that style of cymbal lends to some imperfections. Again, I don't see a problem now but a potential future issue.
 

orash

Member
Especially in the 2nd photo from the right, ending in #502, it does look like the cymbal took a hit the way the edge dips down. It looks like a possible future crack site to me. It's a gamble keeping it IMO. The edges of cymbals...vibrate/move a lot. I'd do an insurance claim on it, rather than take the gamble. I'm assuming it was insured for shipment. I'm not liking what I see.

I did insured it, but i did it mainly for loss or if the package would have been really damaged. It really arrived perfect.Insurance claim would be a non ending story, which will cost me more time than the price of the cymbal itself... And i think if i didn't refuse it when it arrived, i can't really do it (at least with the delivery company i did... )


I live in Reunion which is a french island near Madagascar, so everything is much complicated...

Keeping it is I think my only actual option...
And in that case,
What do you think I should do to make sure it doesnt develop to something bad in future?..


Good to have different point of views



Thanks
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
This bend worries me:
20210728_134733.jpg

It starts right at that little knick. That's not coincidence. I'd be filing a claim with the shipper.
 

roncadillac

Member
I did insured it, but i did it mainly for loss or if the package would have been really damaged. It really arrived perfect. It would be a non ending story, which will cost me more time than the price of the cymbal itself...

I live in Reunion which is a french island near Madagascar, so everything is much complicated...

Keeping it is I think my only actual option...
And in that case,
What do you think I should do to make sure it doesnt develop to something bad in future?..


Good to have different point of views



Thanks

Best thing I could say to avoid potential future damage is to play it smart: don't crash the edge when you can avoid it, don't overplay the cymbal in general, don't be heavy handed, etc. Treat it more like a jazz ride and I think you'll be fine.

Alternatively, and this may be an unpopular opinion... 24" is a good amount of surface area, why not get it trimmed down to say 23.75"? Just enough to remove that small section but not enough to dramatically change the sound, feel, and profile.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Take it to a local cymbalsmith...if you can that is...and get their opinion.

If you feel adventurous you could try gently hammering it back it to the original shape.

Just don't apply any heat. Filing the crack could be another option but by all means consult a pro before doing anything.

Matt Bettis (a member here, mbettis) works with cymbals. I'd seek his advice FOR SURE if you have no one local to you.
 
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C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Best thing I could say to avoid potential future damage is to play it smart: don't crash the edge when you can avoid it, don't overplay the cymbal in general, don't be heavy handed, etc. Treat it more like a jazz ride and I think you'll be fine.
That's something else I should have mentioned. I'm super easy on rides. I don't crash them. I just ride them, so I never make contact with the edge. I've haven't cracked a ride under any circumstances. For that matter, I've cracked only one crash in almost forty years of playing.
 

orash

Member
Thanks everybody :)

Ill try filling a claim.. just because... why not.. maybe i will get some compensation..

but anyway, im planing to keep it, so all your advices are a huge help :)

I do treat them as a jazz, and i dont play heavy at all now.. (for that, i have a nice old Traditonal heavy ride from my metal/rock days :) )

should I try to play it when the knick is away for me ? maybe it will be better? specially when... just in case.. I.. lets say... cant resist crushing it a bit 😏?


I wish i could find a cymbal smith around here.. I doubt there is one... i think i have better chance becoming one than finding one..

for trimming it down a bit - Actually sounds good idea, but I wonder if i wont just regret it. I know that it is better to do it sooner than later from the crack aspect, but frankly im afraid to change the sound. I played so many cymbals and took me a while to find this one....

I prefer to enjoy it as it is i think, and maybe if I see in the future a crack is starting to develop i would try to deal with it - i guess thats also possible ?

And ill let you know Agop's opinion if i get a an answer from them.

Thanks again guys, really.
 

roncadillac

Member
I mean... Blade played that cracked ride that was riveted together with a piece of metal and it sounds great so play that thing into the ground haha. Worst case scenario a crack develops, it will be very slow and you can immediately take corrective measures before it spreads.

A little trick I learned a decade ago on the cymbalholic forum to help find cracks: use something to fill in the crack that helps it show. I've used permanent markers, baking flour, baby powder, powdered graphite, ink, etc. Just rub it into the area real good with your thumb, if there is any crack the cavity will take in the substance and immediately become more visible. If you use a marker acetone will take it off, flour or baby powder simply rinses off.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I'm surprised you don't use a dab of Barbasol, a relic from your shaving-forum days. :)

Take a look at "Trigger," Willie Nelson's go-to guitar, the one without which he said he'd give up music completely. Note the massive crack in the body. Willie refuses to replace it. He claims that, as is, it has the best tone he's ever heard from a six-string. Sometimes, an instrument achieves perfection through decay.

Willie and Trigger.jpg
 
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ToneT

Well-known member
Hello orash! Welcome aboard!
This is THE drummers forum, second to none.

Just my two cents....I don't like that dented edge at all.
Looks like some abuse to me; something that could very well become a crack in due time.
I'd get an exchange.

Once again, welcome!
 

roncadillac

Member
I'm surprised you don't use a dab of Barbasol, a relic from your shaving-forum days. :)

Take a look at "Trigger," Willie Nelson's go-to guitar, the one without which he said he'd give up music completely. Note the massive crack in the body. Willie refuses to repair it. He claims that, as is, it has the best tone he's ever heard from a six-string. Sometimes, an instrument achieves perfection through decay.

View attachment 106769


No, the barbasol is used after to clean the area! Haha, but seriously you'll be surprised at the efficacy of barbasol as a cleaning agent for delicate things.

This is a cool video I remember watching about the guy who periodically repairs Trigger for Willie to keep it going year after year (16 minute total watch):
Pt 1
Pt 2

Ok, back on topic. Yea man, play your cool cymbal, keep and eye on the edge, and immediately take action if a crack forms. Cheers and welcome aboard!
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
No, the barbasol is used after to clean the area! Haha, but seriously you'll be surprised at the efficacy of barbasol as a cleaning agent for delicate things.

This is a cool video I remember watching about the guy who periodically repairs Trigger for Willie to keep it going year after year (16 minute total watch):
Pt 1
Pt 2

Ok, back on topic. Yea man, play your cool cymbal, keep and eye on the edge, and immediately take action if a crack forms. Cheers and welcome aboard!
This instrument is a true icon. I really hope it ends up in a museum instead of in the hands of some insincere auction-addict. It deserves a shrine unto itself.
 
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