A REVELATION.

John Lamb

Senior Member
This sounds like a very interesting book!
It seems to me that most if not all musical instruments have the potential for causing pain, repetitive motion injury and at least discomfort.

Is there a musical instrument that involves only natural body motions? Maybe the Kazoo.

I'm currently trying to learn how to play guitar, and my left hand hurts because I'm trying to bend my fingers in un-natural ways.
Thanks!

Yes - all instruments do - musicians of all types get injured at approximately the same same rate... but the injuries of non-symmetrical instrumentalists such as guitar or the flute are 2x as severe, on average.

re: natural movements.... The trick is to figure out natural movements that operate the instrument. Natural movements are the most efficient anyway
 

John Lamb

Senior Member
Yes, Jojo talks about this in his Secret Weapons for the Modern Drummer Part I DVD, and he explains it very well. By the way John, I have put your Rhythm book on my wishlist, going to get it soon!

Also, you should totally write a book about Traditional versus Matched Grip!
Jojo's DVD is awesome. I'm looking forward to the next one.

Thanks!
 

drumdevil9

Platinum Member
Hell mate, Weckl's own playing seems to be at odds with his comment.

I've been looking on youtube for examples of him playing matched since he made those comments (say, anything in the last 2 years), but can't find a single clip. If he has indeed made the change, then it certainly appears as if he hasn't fully embraced the concept. Sounds good in theory, I guess. I just can't find much evidence of him putting it into practice though.
At a clinic this past summer, I asked Dave about this very issue. His answer was that he still used mostly trad and used matched only for rock/high volume backbeat gigs. His remedy included dietary changes and a bunch of natural stuff (balms and such) to alleviate the discomfort of using trad that caused him real issues in the past. He relayed a story of being on a gig years ago where his hands locked up and he dropped his sticks. Scary stuff. He played trad like a beast as usual at the clinic.

I'm a matched player and have been since the beginning. I dabble in trad but just don't have the dexterity to do a lot of the stuff I can do with matched like fast doubles and such. Another problem is there is no good snare position that works well for both which is something else that Dave touched on. His whole kit is tilted away from him for trad playing.

As for Tony Williams' comment, I get the whole jazz vocabulary trad thing but then there are the amazing exceptions like Will Kennedy. He plays matched open handed and is one of my favorite jazz players. It's not always so simple. Play what feels right to you.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Trad can work fine, even for loud playing. Look at Todd Sucherman and Virgil Donati.

There are som many factors to this. Dave, Vinnie and Steve are sort of first generation playing that hard with traditional and the foundation for their issues may have been laid long ago.
 

drummer-russ

Gold Member
From Larry:

"Trad does look really cool sometimes, but at the same time sometimes it also looks just slightly clumsy, especially when crashing cymbals."

In addition to an easier transition from rim clicks to matched playing, this (above) is another reason I starrted thinking about playing some matched.

I have played mostly traditional and I worry about the fact that because of what Larry mentioned above, unplanned and instinctively, I crash by far mostly with my right hand, and I have rotator cuff issues with my right shoulder. Crashing with my left seems awkward. I am trying to do more of it and improve my technique. But really I just think for easier tunes and maybe increasingly harder ones, I will use more matched, easier to crash with my left hand, less wear and tear on my right shoulder, and easier to get from rim clicks to regular snare back beat and fills.

At my age I put more thought into ergonamics and preventing injuries since it takes longer to heal!
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
From Larry:
"Trad does look really cool sometimes, but at the same time sometimes it also looks just slightly clumsy, especially when crashing cymbals."

In addition to an easier transition from rim clicks to matched playing, this (above) is another reason I starrted thinking about playing some matched.
Wait a minute !
Hold the phone!

It is not easier to transition from rim clicks (cross sticking) to matched grip. It is more difficult. It is easier to transition from cross sticking to traditional grip if you are doing cross sticking the correct way.

However you are right about the cymbals. It is awkward to hit cymbals with your left hand with traditional grip. Especially hitting the hi hat.

.
 
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