A little survey about other musicians opinions

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Would you say that generally speaking, guitarists (or any other pitched instrument player)

think drumset players are in a class below them? Do you think they secretly laugh behind

our backs?
 
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wy yung

Guest
I think good drummers are appreciated and respected. As one moves up the ranks these issues fade away. It's no longer what it was like in Krupa's day when people resented drummers. Drums are now such a big part of modern music it's hard to deny them.
Plus of course other cultures prize drums, such as in Latin America, Africa etc etc.

Lesser drummers have a harder time of it because then other musicians begin to wonder why the drummer cannot play in time and what not.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Despite the endless stream of drummer jokes - I think I've heard 'em all over the years and am yet to play in a band where they're not thrown around mercilessly - when it comes to the crunch, I've never been made to feel like I have nothing to contribute musically, purely because all I do is 'keep time'. Maybe I've just been lucky with the guys and gals I've played with, but any ideas I've ever suggested or wanted to try have been given a fair hearing.....even if they've then been dismissed. Then again when I look back, I've tended to cross paths with many of the same muso's despite playing in quite a few different outfits.......perhaps this is why.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I just got that feeling last night at practice. We were working on an already written original tune, one that I haven't heard before, so he's teaching it to me on the spot. OK so we kick

it off and I didn't insert any pick up notes because I'm still unsteady with the song. I really don't know this song yet, it's only been about a minute. I just kinda caught a momentary flash of

disbelief in his face when I didn't feel the pick up. It was like he was rolling his eyes thinking, "Geez man how could you not feel that?"

I just got the feeling that he must think it's easy playing drums and a monkey could do it.
 

mcbike

Silver Member
I sometimes feel like i'm less than other musicians because even though I'm a great player the only recognizable song I can play on the drums is "wipeout". I sometimes wish I was playing another instrument so I could at least play music for other people. I also am a terrible singer so I guess that makes me feel less than other musicians who can carry a tune. In my band everybody else sings and they can all feature on a song so sometimes I feel like I don't contribute as much.

I do get respected by other band musicians because I have a good ear and I know music theory and in most cases I'm more knowledgeable about music then they are. They are usually shocked when I point out an out of key note in a bass line or suggest a chord substitution.

anytime I'm feeling down about playing drums I just let the other guys take a spin on the drumset and laugh at how bad they are. I can hold my own on guitar, bass, and piano, but those guys can't play two drums at the same time to save their life.
 
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wy yung

Guest
disbelief in his face when I didn't feel the pick up. It was like he was rolling his eyes thinking, "Geez man how could you not feel that?"
Perhaps he did not explain it clearly enough. I wouldn't worry Larry. Who knows what else was on his mind?
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Despite the endless stream of drummer jokes - I think I've heard 'em all over the years and am yet to play in a band where they're not thrown around mercilessly - when it comes to the crunch, I've never been made to feel like I have nothing to contribute musically, purely because all I do is 'keep time'. Maybe I've just been lucky with the guys and gals I've played with, but any ideas I've ever suggested or wanted to try have been given a fair hearing.....even if they've then been dismissed.
Yep, same here. Either that or I'm not picking up when they're dissing me ...
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Both.

There certainly are some out there at look at drummers as replaceable. heck, look how many bands/artists DO replace their drummer with machines, software, or other drummers.
I've certainly been in situations where I've been made to feel less than a real person.

Of course, many do appreciate what a real drummer brings to the table.

I don't think you can totally generalize.
 

Skulmoski

Gold Member
I hate to generalize, but in this case, I think that most competent and socially adjusted drummers get respect. It is when they are poor drummers or misfits that issues arise.

GJS
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
Would you say that generally speaking, guitarists (or any other pitched instrument player)

think drumset players are in a class below them? Do you think they secretly laugh behind

our backs?
I think that you think that.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
other musicians begin to wonder why the drummer cannot play in time and what not.
You hit a nerve here! Why is it that many "musicians" fail to recognize that rhythm is equally their responsibility? I have had too many experiences where the string players don't play in time thinking that it's the drummers job to define that. I get tired of getting pulled off the beat by a sluggish bass player or a guitar player that tends to jump in willy-nilly and have a tendency to rush.

I even knew a drummer with impeccable time who got fired from a session because the tracks weren't grooving right. They brought in a new drummer and same thing! They then began isolating tracks until they determined that it was the bass player all along! Lame.
 

FBDrummer

Junior Member
Would you say that generally speaking, guitarists (or any other pitched instrument player)

think drumset players are in a class below them? Do you think they secretly laugh behind

our backs?
nah, doesnt happen...The Bassist is out delivering Pizza and the guitarist head is so swelled with his greatness that he cant see the rest of us below his giant head, so he has no idea we're there and his amp is cranked up so high he cant hear us either. LOL

seriously, it depends on the musicians your talking about. if it's a bunch of jazz players they have mutual respect for one another, they're usually all educated in music and each really depends on the other and are well aware of the timing and well versed in music theory

in other styles like rock especially a lot of musicians are so caught up with how great they think they are that they couldn't possibly be the weak link. I really notice it with guitarists for some reason.

I dont get any grief in my band because 1) it's my band, I formed it 2) I just blame the bassist 3) the guitarist is busy soloing for his own enjoyment 4.) the singer is outside the door , we know because she cant find the key and doesnt know when to come in.

heh, I better shut up, I make plenty of mistakes and i'll be the first to admit it. Plus my wife is the singer and she'll kick my ass if she reads this :)
 

rogue_drummer

Gold Member
Nah....never. LOL For some oddball reason, it is a lot of cheezy guitarists I've played with who think they invented the guitar. And they are the first to tell you. Usually I find it's musicians who don't have a lot of experience playing live in many venues who have this insane idea that drummers are below them in the pecking order. And their ego shows it.

All the guys in the band I'm in now are so good and musical, it's hard to imagine what the band would be without these guys. Everyone has at least 15 years of experience and there is not an ego among them. They're great to work with. And they like and appreciate my drumming. If they have ideas for the drums I listen because it's always ideas to improve the song. We collaborate and bounce ideas around all the time. They may not be accepted, but they are heard and vetted and given proper thought and consideration.

As for other musicians, usually I find they do appreciate drums, but they don't have any experience with drums or drummers, but it's a reserved respect. For example I recently sat in with several cats who graduated with masters from university music schools and I was pleasantly surprised by their attitude towards me. I was accepted as an equal even though I didn't attend music school.
 

zambizzi

Platinum Member
In my experience, such as it is - yes and no. You can't paint "guitarists" (or anyone) with a collectivist brush, like that.

I'd say most guitarists I've played with sincerely love and appreciate the drums. I have met those that feel it's an inferior, almost primitive instrument (and assume therefore that the person behind is as much.) I don't give the latter a second chance...I don't see the point.

I've had more problems w/ bassists having that attitude, honestly.
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
i have almost never felt like i was being looked down upon by anyone else in the band, whatever band i've been in. most people respect me and let me contribute. part of that may have to do with the fact that i have some musical training and i usually know more about music theory than they do, especially as it applies to rhythm.

but there's no getting around the fact that i'm there in a support role. the big dogs in the band are the singer/songwriters. i'm just there to make their songs sound as good as possible.
 

Average

Senior Member
The best piece of advice I can give to avoid feeling underappreciated is to contribute in some way other than playing your instrument. Learning to play guitar or piano and learning something about music and how it is written will make you more appreciated as a musician. It will make you a FAR better drummer if you can understand the chord progression and where tension is building etc. It will also make it much easier to contribute to the songwriting or even write your own songs.

If you don't want to be treated like 'just the drummer', then don't be 'just the drummer.' Be a musician.
 
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KnockOut86

Senior Member
" the singer is outside the door , we know because she cant find the key and doesnt know when to come in."

Hahahaha!

That sir is an excellent singer joke.
 

fixxxer

Senior Member
I've never felt "less-than" by folks that I have played with. However, there are times that I feel left out, but not necessarily in a bad way.

For example, how many times have you all sat there while the guitarists' / bassists have had their conversations that go like this- "No man, it's supposed to be a G there and then we go to E." (They both make horrible noises on their instruments for a minute until they are where they need to be while you remain silent as not to interupt progress.) Then- "Hey man, I think I'm outta tune!" (Another couple of minutes being quite so that he can get tuned- sigh!)

My point is that, sometimes, I can sit behind the kit for what seems like hours, quietly waiting for them to get thier $#@! together so that we can play! But, usually it's all worth it in the the end!
;>)
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I have met those that feel it's an inferior, almost primitive instrument (and assume therefore that the person behind is as much.) I don't give the latter a second chance...I don't see the point.
I've run into this, too. It says more about them than it does you. All you can really do is walk away.
If you don't want to be treated like 'just the drummer', then don't be 'just the drummer.' Be a musician.
Excellent point.
 
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