A little help with mic/mixer options..

Icetech

Gold Member
Ah thank you doggy and everyone else.. i'm gonna check reviews and such on the EAD as my set is a 5 piece (with snare) and not big at all.. simple and cheap is good:) I just find it hard to believe a EAD10 sounds as good as everyone says... I don't mind spending money, i just always seem to spend it wrong :)
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I will never gig or record... This is mostly just so i can hear myself play
Check out the Boss Jam Station. An old model, the JS-5, was my first jam tool. I placed a Crown PZM mic out in front of the kit, and played along to the 300 installed songs. It also records to SD flash memory so—when you’re ready—you can hear yourself in context. It was an eye-opener for me.
 

Icetech

Gold Member
I will take a look at that...
To those of you with experience :) This would cover what i'm thinking? and use 1 of the 2 inputs in the front to add the computer to?
 

calan

Silver Member
The interface is great but I'd skip the mic pack. 57s are awkward to place around the kit and as venerated as they are,
frankly get outclassed by some newer technology in the same price bracket.

Plus, you don't really have any overheads or room options there. Well, I guess you could use a pair of 57s. People have done worse.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I will take a look at that...
To those of you with experience :) This would cover what i'm thinking? and use 1 of the 2 inputs in the front to add the computer to?
That setup gets you in the ball park. Using the SM57 mics for overheads will not make your kit sound amazing but you'll know what you're playing. The kick mic is great and the SM57 has been used on snare drums more than any other mic. But for overheads, there's better but not cheaper.

The interface will allow you to expand when/if you add more mics to the kit. I've used one before and when it's set up correctly, latency is not an issue.

You'll still need mic stands.

And you'll need to learn Pro Tools to record. It's the industry standard, and it's a deep program.

I'd browse the Focusrite site to understand the interface before I buy, but that's me and my due diligence clause.
 

calan

Silver Member
I'd also suggest the 18i20 be overkill for your purposes, but it will also likely future proof your desires.
 

Icetech

Gold Member
I'd also suggest the 18i20 be overkill for your purposes, but it will also likely future proof your desires.

Yeah.. i figured i can add later if i want.. and i liked that it was a kit.. just makes life easier:) I hate getting into new stuff.. either i worry and overthink or i jump in and waste money.. no middle ground
 

Icetech

Gold Member
Thanks for all the help guys.. decided i'm going to try the glyn johnes style first since if i want to go to close micing later i won't be wasting money.. just adding more mics :) Now to pick out 2 overheards, a kick and snare mic.. overthinking is my game:)
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Snare: Shure sm57
kick: Shure beta 52A
overheads: Shure sm81
 

Icetech

Gold Member
Snare: Shure sm57
kick: Shure beta 52A
overheads: Shure sm81

Thanks CPB will look at reviews (cept the 52A.. and SM57.. i know they are the right ones) Looking at Lewitt LCT 040 Air's for overhead but gonna look at sm81 in a few...

Any ideas on a inexpensiveish mixer with compression (was told to get compression... i know nothing about mics/recording. just wanna play my drums) :)

That being said i do enjoy learning so this is kind of fun for me.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Can the mic survive the drop test?


Compression is valuable for recording. But for simply playing along to tracks and hearing yourself, I don’t think there’s any benefit.

Have fun in your decision-making!
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Just a update.. Ended up getting
2 Lewitt LCD 040 match overheads
1 SM57 for snare (really want the earthworks but not at the price)
1 52a kick..
and a focusrite 18i20..

So i think i'm all set :) Damn headphones now cost me $1500 but worth it :)
Nice!

Let us know when you take the red pill and start recording. ?
 

Icetech

Gold Member
I don't think so, but i will say, having that isolation has already helped me.. i can hear so much more in the music i'm playing with it's insane.. i know i would be much better if i had done this years ago:)
 

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
Being able to monitor your playing is an insanely invaluable practice/learning tool. I decided to do the same thing last July. I ended up getting a Focusrite 8PreX + OctoPre because being able to record into my daw and drive several monitors is a plus. The most important thing for me was being able to monitor all my drum mics, two external devices and a SPDSX and with my set up, I was able to achieve that easily.

Once you get the monitoring mix/micing right, you'll start working on your dynamics to the point where it sounds like you're on the record :)

One more suggestion I can make to you is an app called Moises. It pulls the drums out of music you upload into it (the drums are like 95% gone) so you can play to the music without having to play over other drums. Another invaluable practice tool!
 

Icetech

Gold Member
thanks ogran i will check that out, took my kit down today and vacuumed and cleaned getting ready for stuff to show up... getting too many stands piled up :( Amazing how much dust gathers around a kit
 

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
thanks ogran i will check that out, took my kit down today and vacuumed and cleaned getting ready for stuff to show up... getting too many stands piled up :( Amazing how much dust gathers around a kit
You're currently using over-the-head, headphones right? Another thing that will help with the drum bleed is in-ear monitors. Like these:

They are sound isolating. They will keep the external volume of the drums down so you don't have to blast anything in your ears to compete.
 
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