A Bunch of Drum Set Questions...

Clayton_C

Senior Member
Hey all, I have a bunch of questions that hopefully deserve some answers. :)

First off: I've been listening to drummers like Peter Erskine, Kiko Freitas, and Bernie Dresel a lot lately, trying to emulate their playing styles in terms of jazz drumming AND the general sound of their drum sets. I really like the power and resonance they get out of their snare drums (the punch Peter Erskine can put behind a rimshot is amazing), and I simply can't seem to get the controlled crack I want with my Sonor Force 3003 stock snare.
I was wondering if anyone can recommend a snare drum within the $200-$500 range that will get me that sensitivity and powerful sound that works well in a robust jazz/big band setting. Here are a few videos with the snare sound I'm diggin'...
http://drummerworld.com/Videos/petererskinerhythmmethod.html
http://drummerworld.com/Videos/petererskinegroovin.html
http://drummerworld.com/Videos/kikofreitasnossotrioventobravo.html

Second Question: This (and the next Q.) is sort of a DIY thing. My Sonor 3003 set is great, and several of my jazz-club pals have commented on it's sound... but with the boring old black-plastic wraps... it'd hard to tell it from a $800 kit on looks alone. Since (let's face it) aesthetics is one of the things that you love in a good kit... I was wondering how dangerous it would be to try and remove the plastic wraps.
I'm considering either buying some sort of glitter wrap, or (since I love the natural wood look), staining and sealing the maple shells and getting black chrome hardware to top it off. How risky is this process, and are there any special manuals, tips, or books I can get to help?

Last Question: Also DIY... this is a cymbal question, but I just slapped it up here rather than create a whole new thread for one simple question. Anyway, here it is: I've heard tons of rumor surrounding "distressing your cymbals", in other words, lathering them with abrasive cleaner, burying them under sand, or re-hammering them in order to give them more wash, darkness, trash, etc. I have a set of Sabian AAs (crash, HH, ride), and I would definitely like to get a more TINNY sound, if that makes sense... more wash and stick definition, less ping.
Can anyone give me advice about do-it-yourself cymbal-modification? Would it more effective/safer to just buy a dry or flat ride?

Thanks in advance,
Clayton C.
 

phil_qc

Senior Member
Free bump !! I also want to know...

The first video on your post of Peter Erskine
is just amazing... This guy is tight ! and it sound
beautifull on my stereo system... I'm thinking of
removing my mid tom to make place for cymbals...

Phil.
 

Clayton_C

Senior Member
By all mean, DO IT! I decided to remove my mid tom a few years ago and it makes all the difference in the ease with which you play the ride. Thanks for the bump, too. ;)
 
W

wy yung

Guest
Hey all, I have a bunch of questions that hopefully deserve some answers. :)

First off: I've been listening to drummers like Peter Erskine, Kiko Freitas, and Bernie Dresel a lot lately, trying to emulate their playing styles in terms of jazz drumming AND the general sound of their drum sets. I really like the power and resonance they get out of their snare drums (the punch Peter Erskine can put behind a rimshot is amazing), and I simply can't seem to get the controlled crack I want with my Sonor Force 3003 stock snare.
I was wondering if anyone can recommend a snare drum within the $200-$500 range that will get me that sensitivity and powerful sound that works well in a robust jazz/big band setting. Here are a few videos with the snare sound I'm diggin'...
http://drummerworld.com/Videos/petererskinerhythmmethod.html
http://drummerworld.com/Videos/petererskinegroovin.html
http://drummerworld.com/Videos/kikofreitasnossotrioventobravo.html

Second Question: This (and the next Q.) is sort of a DIY thing. My Sonor 3003 set is great, and several of my jazz-club pals have commented on it's sound... but with the boring old black-plastic wraps... it'd hard to tell it from a $800 kit on looks alone. Since (let's face it) aesthetics is one of the things that you love in a good kit... I was wondering how dangerous it would be to try and remove the plastic wraps.
I'm considering either buying some sort of glitter wrap, or (since I love the natural wood look), staining and sealing the maple shells and getting black chrome hardware to top it off. How risky is this process, and are there any special manuals, tips, or books I can get to help?

Last Question: Also DIY... this is a cymbal question, but I just slapped it up here rather than create a whole new thread for one simple question. Anyway, here it is: I've heard tons of rumor surrounding "distressing your cymbals", in other words, lathering them with abrasive cleaner, burying them under sand, or re-hammering them in order to give them more wash, darkness, trash, etc. I have a set of Sabian AAs (crash, HH, ride), and I would definitely like to get a more TINNY sound, if that makes sense... more wash and stick definition, less ping.
Can anyone give me advice about do-it-yourself cymbal-modification? Would it more effective/safer to just buy a dry or flat ride?

Thanks in advance,
Clayton C.

Unsure if I can help you with all of this. Will try.

First I recomend leaving the black wrap on the kit. The reason being later when you sell it, black will help you. People love black kits.

The cymbal question could probably be dealt with by a few rivets or a Pro Mark chain. Burying a thick cymbal wont make it thinner.

There are many options for the snare. I'd suggest a Ludwig SupraPhonic or Black Beauty. I believe they are in that price range in the states.

Plus you get out of a drum what you put into it. Erskine's sound is achieved by the way he hits the drum more than the drum itself. His technique is exceptional and is what produces the sound.
 

Clayton_C

Senior Member
Yes, after you mentioned them, I've been looking at the Black Beauty and the new Black Magic. Both seem very affordable and great-sounding. Also, I've tried putting chains on my ride and it irritated me quite a bit... what I want is not SIZZLE exactly, just less tone and ping. I think that if I had to point to one cymbal to exemplify what I'm looking for in a (secondary) ride cymbal... it's the 22" Bosphorus Turk Flat Ride. Listen to this thing!!!
http://cymbalsonly.com/cymbals/Bos/sf/k/22kf2760k.mp3
So I suppose I ought to just buy it... :D
Thanks for the reply though. I'm fairly certain there's perfectly knowledgeable drummers out there with a google of brilliant replies... but no-one seems to be biting... :(
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
1. Ludwig Supraphonic
2. Leave the wrap on...it's a nightmare to remove while trying to leave your shell intact
3. Get new cymbals. Use the money you saved by not re-wrapping your drums.

Oh, and...

V V V V V
 

Clayton_C

Senior Member
haha okay, I will definitely buy used! Any suggestions for places to find decent cymbals and a ludwig snare? I know of craigslist and ebay, although I'm a bit finnicky about those sorts of sites after a laptop came to me with a colossal crack in the side...
 
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