'51 Slingerland Resto-mod

uniongoon

Gold Member
Bought this snare last year, it was ugly and sounded as bad as any snare could. It had elongated holes, was out of shape, bad edges. So I got into rescuing it, and it turned out looking and sounding better than expected. The finish is an automotive base/clear urethane with hand sprinkled flake.
I cannot capture the lustre in still photos, but if you check the video, it shows the flip flop finish come to life.
For a 15X8, it sounds crisp and tight, but still retains the big body you would expect. The edges are pretty sharp dual 45's, which I used so it would not be to fat and muddy, the plan worked.

http://youtu.be/AlAMxORl4Tk




 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Great job. It's always nice to see vintage instruments given a second lease on life.

Do you have any 'before' pics?
 

Red Menace

Platinum Member
Wowee! That is quite a thing you have there. I'm loving that glitter finish. Its just mesmerizing. Sounds beautiful too. Will you be keeping it or are there any plans to sell?

For some reason, I had always hoped that you would have the French Canadian accent.

If I may, I'd like to pick your brain on the glitter finish a bit. I was thinking of trying something like this on a Rogers kit that I have been working on. What would you recommend to someone trying something like this at home? I figure I'll get a more even layer with a rattle can. Any kind of spray you'd recommend? Did you have to knock the glitter down after applying it?
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
I use gravity low pressure guns, but you could do it with rattle cans. Spray your base colour, a couple light coats, let them tack up, then give it a nice heavy wet coat. You can find all different size and color flake in a craft store, I go to Micheals, not sure if they have outlets in the states or not.
I just sprinkled by hand, and ended up with a pretty inconsistent spread, but it actually worked for the better on this one. It has the looks kind of like a galaxy through the Hubble telescope. You might try putting the flake in a pepper shaker to get a more even spread. I would not push them in because you don't want the paint covered or flooding the sparkle.
Let it dry, then build up the clear coat, 3 or 4 coats, let it dry, give it a wet sand with 320 or 400, and repeat until no sparkle texture can be felt. Let that dry for a week or two and then do the standard wet sand 600-2000 and buff with some polish and you should be good to go.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
Hard to see and only original picture, at the top of each lug the holes are opened up so much that the lugs do not cover. Aftermarket throw off, and lots of gashes and dents.



Really bad stock edges, lots of low spots, it really rocked on the marble slab.



Body work


And the powder coat restoration of the throw off, I had to make the throw off arm. This old Radio King throw off system has been sitting in a box for 25 years or so and I really enjoyed bringing it back into usable shape again.

 

mmulcahy1

Platinum Member
You're right, that sparkle finish really lights up in the video. The higher tuning on that drum sounded great, too.

Also, that carbon fiber drum is going to look sweet. Keep us updated!!
 

Beam Me Up Scotty

Silver Member
Goon, I've seen some of your other posts, and man, you really know what you're doing. Absolutely lovin' that snare! The finish is gorgeous, and it sounds pretty darn good! Also, I have to say, I like your kit's sound as well.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
What I call a "proper job"! Great work, good choices, diligently executed = superb result.

You mentioned deeper than standard snare beds. Is this something you decided to do, or were you mirroring the original specification? Either way, good choice on a drum that's naturally on the more shell responsive end of the spectrum compared to most modern ply shells.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
You're right, that sparkle finish really lights up in the video. The higher tuning on that drum sounded great, too.

Also, that carbon fiber drum is going to look sweet. Keep us updated!!

Thank you. I tried several settings to photo the finish and failed every time. There has to be some secret with multiple lights or something, in person and on the video the finish blows me away. First drum I tried this on, I did a repair on an old Gretsch bass drum hoop last year, which started the idea. But I feel I lucked out that it turned out this good.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
Goon, I've seen some of your other posts, and man, you really know what you're doing. Absolutely lovin' that snare! The finish is gorgeous, and it sounds pretty darn good! Also, I have to say, I like your kit's sound as well.

Thanks, one of my 4 kits. These are older Premier Signias which really need new heads top and bottom, but they sound pretty good in any setting, great drums.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
What I call a "proper job"! Great work, good choices, diligently executed = superb result.

You mentioned deeper than standard snare beds. Is this something you decided to do, or were you mirroring the original specification? Either way, good choice on a drum that's naturally on the more shell responsive end of the spectrum compared to most modern ply shells.

Thank you Andy, much appreciated. Radio Kings and these Concert Kings came from the factory with deep beds. The shell needed turning down quite a bit to true it up, I think I took off close to 3/16" off the total depth to get the edges to a blank slate so I could recut them the way I wanted. Then I just re contoured the stock bed, so it is probably 1/16" less deep than stock but still is fairly deep, didn't measure, but probably 3/16".
I did not want it to sound like most of the 15X8 snares I have played, too bottom happy, not enough crisp clarity, and I succeeded, so I got lucky on that too I guess.
 
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