42 vs 30 vs 20 Strand Snare Wires

pxavier

Senior Member
I have a Pork Pie BOB and it's been working perfectly for me until I remove the aquarian studio ring I have. When I do, it sounds a lot less fat. I was wondering if getting more than 20 snare strands would help fatten the sound. I like being able to feel my snare drum and my bass drum in my chest during a groove.

14x6.5
Brass, 20 strands
Batter head medium tuning
Reso head higher tuning
HD Dry Batter, Evans Glass 500 Reso
 

zarrdoss

Gold Member
more strands = more snare sound, less strands = more drum sound, you will have to experiment and see if you like it but remember if your snare bed is not wide or deep enough to accommodate more strands it could buzz like crazy. You might try the Puresound 30 strand custom.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I have a Pork Pie BOB and it's been working perfectly for me until I remove the aquarian studio ring I have. When I do, it sounds a lot less fat. I was wondering if getting more than 20 snare strands would help fatten the sound. I like being able to feel my snare drum and my bass drum in my chest during a groove.

14x6.5
Brass, 20 strands
Batter head medium tuning
Reso head higher tuning
HD Dry Batter, Evans Glass 500 Reso
Sounds more like a tuning issue than anything to do with the wires. Man, a HD dry batter head and a studio ring! That drum must be as thumpy & dead as hell. If you deaden a drum, you're effectively removing most of the shell tone. The head's & the drum's ability to resonate is what gives it it's tone, & it's overtones are what gives it fatness. The trick is to reduce the high overtones but keep the lower ones. Think of it as similar to adding chorus to a bass guitar. Try going for a more open sound, & tuning out the high overtones/rings rather than dampening the drum. With the exception of recording, muffling a drum is a last resort.

Remember too, the audience won't hear most of the drum's high overtones/buzzes, in fact, both of those in moderation give it life. Just my opinion, of course, each to his own.
 

zarrdoss

Gold Member
I just woke up and didn't think of it till now and K.I.S beat me to it, that is allot of dampening and muffling and I did a little research on your reso head and its really thick and designed to darken the sound as well from what I am reading. Maybe you need to lighten up on the muffling and let it breathe, then worry about strands.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
I would just stick to the 20 strand snares and work on the tuning and muffing issues. The sound is in there, you just got to find it.

Dennis
 

pxavier

Senior Member
Just got 30 strand snares... It sounds AMAZING now. Exactly the fatness I wanted. Tuning was not the issue- thanks guys!
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
I like a 42 with the inner 12-16 wires removed.

IMO there should be some open water in the middle of the reso head so it can expand, you'll get a fuller sound as opposed to the wires crossing the reso heads dead center and not letting it expand, especially at lower volumes.
 

pxavier

Senior Member
I like a 42 with the inner 12-16 wires removed.

IMO there should be some open water in the middle of the reso head so it can expand, you'll get a fuller sound as opposed to the wires crossing the reso heads dead center and not letting it expand, especially at lower volumes.
Wow that sounds pretty sick actually... Sends me straight to the lab!
 

Big Foot

Silver Member
I like a 42 with the inner 12-16 wires removed.

IMO there should be some open water in the middle of the reso head so it can expand, you'll get a fuller sound as opposed to the wires crossing the reso heads dead center and not letting it expand, especially at lower volumes.
Very interesting idea - makes sense. I'm going to try this in the future.
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
Just got 30 strand snares... It sounds AMAZING now. Exactly the fatness I wanted. Tuning was not the issue- thanks guys!
Hey if you're happy with the sound, keep it, but let me just say something.

KIS is right on the money, to get the best snare sound possible, you really have to bring out the tone of the snare. The three things that kill tone: muffling, too many snare wires, and bad tuning.
It sounds like you already have 2 of these on your drum.

If I were you, I'd keep the 20 strand, lose the 500 reso, and solve the rest with tuning. IMO opinion the 500 reso is too thick for a snare reso and again kills the tone.

One of the best ways to get fatness out of your drum is to actually tune the reso head lower than the batter. I have a 12" musashi snare, and using this tuning method I can get a big full sound but still with a bright attack (which is what I was going for). I also use only 4 snare wires on that drum.

If you like how it sounds, keep it, but I'd bet that you would get a better sound using the above method.
 

pxavier

Senior Member
Hey if you're happy with the sound, keep it, but let me just say something.

KIS is right on the money, to get the best snare sound possible, you really have to bring out the tone of the snare. The three things that kill tone: muffling, too many snare wires, and bad tuning.
It sounds like you already have 2 of these on your drum.

If I were you, I'd keep the 20 strand, lose the 500 reso, and solve the rest with tuning. IMO opinion the 500 reso is too thick for a snare reso and again kills the tone.

One of the best ways to get fatness out of your drum is to actually tune the reso head lower than the batter. I have a 12" musashi snare, and using this tuning method I can get a big full sound but still with a bright attack (which is what I was going for). I also use only 4 snare wires on that drum.

If you like how it sounds, keep it, but I'd bet that you would get a better sound using the above method.
Yup, already got that covered. And my brass shell rings a lot- does it's job. But I wanted less ring, so I added snare wires. Thanks man :)
 

Killadeer

Junior Member
I'm my experience to get a solid fat tone with unwanted overtones.
I recommend Evans HD dry batter head, Evans 300 hazy snare reso, Puresound twists snare wires - on low tension. Tune the top head to 90 tension and bottom to 75 tension with a drum dial. You should get a low fundamental tone in that settling regardless of drum shell wood.
 
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