3D Printed Snare

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I’m wondering if a 3D printer could make smaller, practical accessories and parts that usually cost a lot for what you get, like memory locks, tension locks, muffling, etc. Basically, things that don’t undergo a lot of stress and aren’t subject to being constantly hit.
Memory locks is a fantastic idea.

We could also make specific cam profiles for pedals. I can see the great cam debate, with metronomic audio evidence of people trying to gain just 1 more bpm. Just one more degree will get it there a little faster...
 

Iristone

Well-known member
Could 3D production methods be effective with cymbals as well, ensuring a reproduction of sound superior to that of stamping?
Don't think so. Hammering a cymbal results in changes of the lattice structure and introduces strain. It will change how the metal vibrates and introduce "tone". The same reason why "stamped" cymbals don't sound good.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
Off subject a little...thinking of this because I'm at work.
Could solder work to repair minor cymbal cracks?
Both are on the softer metal side.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
plus custom footboards and custom plastic beater heads which give “proven” 🤣 bass drum sonic improvements. Some plastic beater heads will be tuned to D#. 🤣
Plus they could make "locking " pedals like with bicycles for that drummer who drinks a tad much.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Off subject a little...thinking of this because I'm at work.
Could solder work to repair minor cymbal cracks?
Both are on the softer metal side.
They make bronze solder. They (whomever that is) also make bronze brazing sticks. I have no idea how well it would work. I can tell you what doesnt work, acetylene welding. It's too hot. I got the bead started and was pushing it pretty well until it too much material melted. Once hardened, it was a big nasty mess that fell out of the cymbal almost immediately upon striking it.

It was a shop class experiment 26 years ago that didnt work. The cymbal was junk already so it didnt matter.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
They make bronze solder. They (whomever that is) also make bronze brazing sticks. I have no idea how well it would work. I can tell you what doesnt work, acetylene welding. It's too hot. I got the bead started and was pushing it pretty well until it too much material melted. Once hardened, it was a big nasty mess that fell out of the cymbal almost immediately upon striking it.

It was a shop class experiment 26 years ago that didnt work. The cymbal was junk already so it didnt matter.
Yup...I can see acetylene blowing a hole in a cymbal. I think Propane (and propane accessories) might not be hot enough. I know Mapp gas is hotter but I don't know how much hotter.
Just one of those random thoughts that jumped at me. I've never brazed anything but copper to copper.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
Wanna taste the meat, not the freakin' heat
Propane
Charcoals' too dang hot, yep, I'll tell you what
Propane
 

felonious69

Well-known member
While I was sleeping I was wondering why dude made it all in one. Re-watched the video and OK.
But did anyone consider not making it that way and 3D printing JUST the shell...still using separate lugs and hardware?
You could have the basic shell, but printed to fit your preferred hardware.
I am assuming there are varying degrees of hardware quality, durability, ease of use and sound manipulation.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
A Pearl Chrystal beat 4 pc is like 1500. That's synthetic material, so what research went into THAT sound?
 

felonious69

Well-known member
ALSO! Everything I've seen 3D printed is one color (Think black print cartridge) Could you use a "color" cartridge, with some AWESOME designing and have, say, photo quality dragons on you drums?
 

moodman

Well-known member


Right, no revealing the sound of the drum in the first video, (but you could tapdance on the board) the second video does and it is not good, but their slogan could be "Take a wizz on our drums"
 
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