3 snares

billcosby_sweater

Junior Member
So I am deciding between a Ludwig supraphonic, mapex nomad and a tama g bubinga. I want something that is versatile, very sensitive and has a nice crunchy sound to it but also very crisp. Also a cheaper price would definitely help. Warm, crunchy/crispy sound, nice crack tuned high or throaty tone tuned medium tension and I like ring and sustain. Which one better first my description?
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
You ist a Supra, then two wooden drums that are fairly different in almost every regard. My opinion is that you should decide between wood and metal before you start narrowing down the field.

Otherwise, just buy a Supra because they're awesome ;-)
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
A good brass shell drum is something you'll always have use for. What do you have already?
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
A supra is aluminium, so there's not much point getting the supra unless you're trading in the Pearl.

If you're keeping the Pearl, try both wooden drums first. I've not played either, but they both have good reputations. I'd personally go with the Tama - I'm a big fan of Bubinga.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
If you like what you have, I'd probably go with wood next, just because you sort of need one of each. I have no experience with your choices, though.

I have mostly Gretsch drums, I generally prefer them to Ludwig but have a nice Black Beauty that I use mostly for accoustic stuff, and the main snares are a Colaiuta(basically a USA maple) and a hammered brass. I could live fine with only those two. I want something slightly wetter I use a regular chrome over brass.

Though I have preferences, you never really know if the wood or metal snare works best in a room. Other than that it's just taste.

Basically, if you have a metal that works for you, get something woody. :) Bubinga is a really hard wood and to me the Tama bubinga snares I've heard are quite "brass like."

The Nomad is a very nice snare, though.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Mu8V5KhnwY
 

Thunder 42

Silver Member
If I were to buy only one for myself it would be the Supra, they are awesome indeed. I picked up an SLP G Bubinga this August and that's the only main snare I've played since getting it. It is a beast.
 

Thunder 42

Silver Member
Bubinga wood vs. metal snare. I do not own a Supra, was fortunate to play one on another drummers kit, and I love the sound. I do own a Ludwig Acrolyte, and love it too - they are great sounding aluminum snares. I will get a Supraphonic someday.

I play Tama drums, really like the SLP series and bubinga drums, love the sound. But it is a wood drum. The G Bubinga has plenty of sound and volume, and it works for what I play. It is a loud drum.

As stated earlier in this thread, recommend deciding whether you want another metal snare, or buy a wood drum. You cannot go wrong with either purchase.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
I had a setup with two snares for years, one wood, one metal, very versatile and offer lots of sound possibilities.

I'll choose a wood shell and keep the Pearl.
 

Thunder 42

Silver Member
I had a setup with two snares for years, one wood, one metal, very versatile and offer lots of sound possibilities.

I'll choose a wood shell and keep the Pearl.
I also rotate my Acro as my side snare. Good recommendation.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Seems to me that the Nomad is a brass snare drum, with a nice price tag. It is a beautiful drum though, as are the others you mentioned. I am also obsessing over a wood SLP snare drum, like the Bubinga, or do I want a good ole steel Pork Pie, or the Metalworks Tama, which is also steel?

I used to have a maple ddrum snare, 14x7. It was ok, but I've been into metal drums the last few years. Now I have 2 aluminums (an old Gretsch and an Acrolite) and 1 nickle over brass (Pork Pie BoB).

That Bubinga one sure is nice, isn't it?
 

billcosby_sweater

Junior Member
Seems to me that the Nomad is a brass snare drum, with a nice price tag. It is a beautiful drum though, as are the others you mentioned. I am also obsessing over a wood SLP snare drum, like the Bubinga, or do I want a good ole steel Pork Pie, or the Metalworks Tama, which is also steel?

I used to have a maple ddrum snare, 14x7. It was ok, but I've been into metal drums the last few years. Now I have 2 aluminums (an old Gretsch and an Acrolite) and 1 nickle over brass (Pork Pie BoB).

That Bubinga one sure is nice, isn't it?

Which snare will give me that nice crunchy/crispy sound the nomad or the bubinga?
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
Which snare will give me that nice crunchy/crispy sound the nomad or the bubinga?

Definitely brass will deliver crunchy/crispy. So, probably you need that Nomad snare. I've never heard one. The Supra will give you a sound much like Bonham's sound. I can't comment on the Bubinga though. I've heard video's, and it sounds great, but more punchy and warm, like an Eagles song.
 
T

The SunDog

Guest
A supra is aluminium, so there's not much point getting the supra unless you're trading in the Pearl.

If you're keeping the Pearl, try both wooden drums first. I've not played either, but they both have good reputations. I'd personally go with the Tama - I'm a big fan of Bubinga.

It's aluminum...ish. It's some kind of aluminum alloy, oh and it's chrome plated. All of that makes for a great drum. Vastly superior to a run of the mill aluminum snare. To the OP, you have described every characteristic of every type of snare drum in one and you want it cheap. Plus you've used all manner of vague descriptions. "Warm, crunchy, crispy, and throaty" oh yeah and don't forget "cheap". All of these can mean different things to everyone, except maybe cheap, which is a terrible limitation to put on a snare. At any rate I'm not sure you can get everything you want, but then it sounds like you don't really know exactly what you want.
 

mandrew

Gold Member
The Pearl Sensitone is a wonderful drum, and I would keep it and go for a wood. But, I would not rule out maple as a possibility. If you want versatility, maple is a solid choice. Bubinga sounds nice too, but is not a versatile in all tunings and head choices as maple. Just a thought.
 
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